THE OTOLITH GROUP

The Radiant & People To Be Resembling
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series

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Monday, March 23, 7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

THE RADIANT and PEOPLE TO BE RESEMBLING
by The Otolith Group
Screened in association with LUX

Preceded by BABBIT RESERVE MINING BLAST by Jack Behrend
Courtesy of Chicago Film Archives
With minimalist synth improvisation by Nick Broste, Kent Lambert, and Seth Vanek

Program Details
THE RADIANT(2012, HD video, 64 min)
Commissioned as part of dOCUMENTA (13) in 2012, The Radiant explores the aftermath of March 11, 2011, when the Tohoku earthquake triggered a tsunami that killed many thousands and caused the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. A film essay burdened by the difficult task of representing the invisible aftermath of nuclear fallout, The Radiant travels through time and space to invoke the historical promises of nuclear energy and the threats of radiation that converge in Japan’s illuminated cities and evacuated villages in the months immediately following the disasters. The Otolith Group’s cinematic document offers glimpses into the shape and presence of an unseen entity and its abstract manifestation through visual phenomena.

PEOPLE TO BE RESEMBLING (2102, HD video, 22min)
People To Be Resembling can be described as a five sided portrait of the methodologies of the post-free jazz, pre-world music trio Codona, founded by multi-instrumentalists Collin Walcott, Don Cherry, and Nana Vasconcelos in 1978. Consisting of stills by renowned photographers Roberto Masotti and Isio Saba, newly filmed and archival footage and original music performed by musician Charles Hayward, People to be Resembling reimagines the poetics of permutation that informed the sonic geography of the first Codona album recorded with ECM in September 1978. People to be Resembling returns to 1978 in order to redream the recording process at Tonstudio Bauer as a meditation upon the relations between visual anthropology, anti-colonial choreography, nuclear annihilation and Weltmusik. In its arrangement of positive and negative with colour and black and white and still and moving imagery, The Otolith Group’s People to Be Resembling stages an experiment in mnemonic cohabitation inspired by the visionary music of Codona.

The Otolith Group was founded in 2002 and consists of Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun who live and work in London. During their longstanding collaboration The Group have drawn from a wide range of resources and materials. They explore the moving image, the archive, the sonic and the aural within the gallery context. The work is research based and in particular has focused on the essay film as a form that seeks to look at conditions, events and histories in their most expanded form.

 

Special thanks to LUX and Chicago Film Archives for Program Support

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Filed under: Uncategorized

Jennifer Reeder for Trunk Show

Exhibition Opening & Video Mixtape

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Tuesday, March 24 at 7 pm
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

Trunk Show, the mobile exhibition space and artist bumper sticker project directed and driven by Raven Falquez Munsell and Nightingale programmer Jesse Malmed, is elated to return to the cinema. Its first opening, all the way back in 2013, was gleefully rained out of the park and into the Nightingale. That was for Eric Fleischauer’s now sold-out PUNK IS DAD sticker, which might have more to do with this one than you’d think.

In addition to releasing the sticker, snacking on the snacks and all the usual wonderful things that happen at Trunk Show openings, Jennifer Reeder is going to unveil a video mixtape of sorts revealing moments that have stuck with her and that have made their ways into and out of her films.

Here’s what Trunk Show has to say: (more…)



Filed under: artist in attendance, experimental, feminism, found footage, opening, video

FOLLOW FOCUS

Daviel Shy and THE LADIES ALMANACK
Spring Screening / The Nightingale Turns 7!

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Saturday, April 4, 7 pm, $15
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

The Nightingale is delighted to introduce FOLLOW FOCUS- a new process-oriented screening series that rallies audiences and resources behind a moving image maker as they complete a feature project. Designed to expand viewership into the production stage, FOLLOW FOCUS invites audiences to observe a director’s process, collaborations, and inspiration. Our inaugural featured project is THE LADIES ALMANACK written and directed by Chicago-based filmmaker, Daviel Shy and produced by NYC-based performer, Stephanie Acosta.

THE LADIES ALMANACK is a feature-­length experimental narrative film shot on Super 8 and based on the novel of the same title by Djuna Barnes. The film is a kaleidoscopic tribute to women’s writing through the friendships, jealousies, flirtations and publishing woes of authors and artists in 1920’s Paris.

The Nightingale will host 4 screenings during the course of the next year, each one in a different season and  highlighting a different element of the process ending with a rough cut screening in Fall of 2015. The production of a commissioned art object will also raise funds for the film.  Admission price  at each of the four screenings includes part of a limited edition, risograph-printed Ladies Almanack Tarot Deck designed and illustrated by Jess LeMaster. Attend all four screenings for a complete 24-card set.

The Spring Screening will include moving image work by cast, and crew members of  the movie, including work by Stephanie Acosta, Weléla Mar Kindred, and Fannie Sosa & Poussy Draama. Party to celebrate The Nightingale’s 7th birthday to follow the screening.

Special Thanks to Homeroom for program support of this event.

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BEYOND THE EMB

Beyond The Empire Marketing Board (EMB):
Nonfiction Films by Basil Wright, Mark Lapore, and Meredith Lackey from 1934-2014
Filmmaker Meredith Lackey in person!

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Wednesday, April 8th, $5-10
Doors open at 7:30 pm
Program starts at 8 pm
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

When I was a very young man and had no resources, Grierson sent me around the Caribbean in 1933 to film the British Colonies; Jamaica, Barbados and all that chain of islands. I was alone and toting a camera about and I wasn’t very experienced. I wished I could have managed to say more about the diabolical capitalist or British Colonial policy which was always so nice and fat. I got a bit of it into Song of Ceylon the next year, but, you see, if you’re working for the Empire Marketing Board in the British Colonies, you can’t do it. -Basil Wright from Daniella Gitlin in To Experience Song of Ceylon (*)

This program is made of three films that step beyond the traditional terms of nonfiction cinema, which John Grierson called “documentary” while head of Britain’s Empire Marketing Board. The program starts with Basil Wright’s Song of Ceylon. Wright remarked on shooting the film:

“I started shooting the film with a logic I couldn’t understand. I couldn’t imagine why I was forcing myself or being forced by something inside me to shoot the material.”-Basil Wright (***)

I believe Depression in the Bay of Bengal, A by Mark Lapore and Shwebontha by Meredith Lackey share this intuitive approach that Wright excitedly describes: interacting with a specific moment and place through a moving image camera. Their films favor the organicism of learning by seeing and listening over the strict dictations of producers protecting clients’ interests, their own expectations, or funding proposals. Furthermore, Lapore’s film, Depression in the Bay of Bengal, was funded by a Fulbright Grant to revisit – and possibly recreate – Wright’s Songs of Ceylon.

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Filed under: 16mm, archival, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, Uncategorized

INCALL: A Film by Brock Riebe

INCALL, the LAST call you’ll ever make!

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Friday, April 10, 8 pm, $10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

ABOUT THE FILM
Kasey is down on his luck. He has no family or friends except an obnoxious, overbearing female (Beth) who always seems to show up at the wrong time (is it love?). To make ends meet, Kasey does “incall” massage from his apartment. Unfortunately, some of his married, middle aged, male clients are more interested in things OTHER than massage. Enter Marco, a sexy drifter, in the country under mysterious circumstances. After the accidental death of one of his massage clients, and through a bizarre set of circumstances, Kasey enlists the help of Marco to dispose of the body. What started as an accident soon becomes intentional as the duo lure unsuspecting men to their deaths. Its a race against time to get enough cash together to leave the country before they’re caught by the police, the landlord or the obnoxious Beth! How will this sex charged thriller end? Wouldn’t you like to know?!

INCALL: The last call you’ll ever make!

Brock Riebe is a filmmaker, actor, writer, singer/songwriter from Madison, WI. He has earned a degree in Communications from the University of WI at Madison. Incall is both his feature film acting as well as directorial debut. His goal as a filmmaker (and actor) is to create stories, characters and scenarios that deal with issues, not readily or honestly explored by mainstream media, in a fresh, innovative and entertaining way. He has lived and worked in New York City, San Francisco, Miami, and Chicago.

Learn more about the film and watch the trailer at www.incallmovie.com

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, film, queer, video

RECYCLED CINEMA

Work by  Roger Beebe
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series
Roger Beebe in person!

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Monday, April 20,  7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

Filmmaker/curator/professor Roger Beebe returns to Chicago with a contemporary expanded cinema program titled RECYCLED CINEMA that will immerse the audience in imagery and sound. Best known for his live cinema performances, Beebe will host an evening of carefully crafted and meticulously timed multi-projector experiments that pull from his practice of appropriating educational, industrial and mass-cultural imagery. Decidely analogue, Bebee intentionally places the projectors and the projectionist (himself) in the room with the audience. His performances often incorporate archival material to build loose themes and visual synchronicity into accumulative, experimental documentaries pieces.

Program Details:
Strip Mall Trilogy (2001, 9:10, super8mm)
“The Strip Mall Trilogy” is a series of three city symphonies that attempt to liberate color, sound, and form from the sprawling consumerist landscape of postmodern America. Part 1, “Green Means Go,” presents fragments of color over a musique concrete soundtrack composed of sounds recorded at the strip mall. Part 2, “The Abecedaire,” wrestles (and later plays) with alphabetic form extracted and abstracted from the signs of commerce of which they are normally a part. Part 3, “X-formations,” tries to argue that there is, in fact, beauty after strip malls. Let’s hope so. Parts 1 and 3 were edited entirely in camera.

Famous Irish Americans (2003, 8:00, digital video)
Who’s your famous Irish American? Georgia O’Keefe? William McKinley? Sandra Day O’Connor? How about Shaquille O’Neal? This videotape is a secret history of some of our most overlooked Irish-American citizens; a hyperflat exploration of race, America, and the limits of binary thought.

Money Changes Everything (2009-2011, 5:00, 3x16mm)
Three days in Las Vegas, Nevada; three different visions of the discarded past and of the constantly renewed future. A three-part portrait of a town in transformation: a suburban utopia in the desert, a cancerous sprawl of unplanned development, a destination for suicides.

S A V E (2006, 5:15, 16mm)
A disused gas station offers a curious imperative to passersby: “SAVE.” A riddle posed in the form of architecture: what is there to save? One more installment in the history of Americans pointing their cameras at gas stations; an attempt to figure out something about where we’ve been, where we’re headed, and what’s been left behind. The first part of “S A V E” was edited entirely in camera.

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Filed under: 16mm, archival, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, performance, Super 8mm

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