1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

CELLULAR CINEMA: LIMINALISM

Touring Program from Minneapolis

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, February 11th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Neither subject nor object, neither figure nor ground, neither signal nor noise, neither inside nor out… LIMINALISM is a collection of short, experimental 16mm film, video and expanded cinema from Minnesota-based artists that explores the dreamlike and surreal realm in which we find ourselves when our perception of clear boundaries and separateness dissolves.

LIMINALISM is a traveling program curated by Cellular Cinema, the only regularly recurring experimental film and video screening series in Minneapolis. Cellular Cinema began in 2014 and has presented roughly two dozen screenings of work by local and international artists, alone and in partnership with organizations such as the Walker Art Center, the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, and the White Page Gallery. 

Programmed by Raul Benitez, Michael Wawzenek.



Filed under: Uncategorized

NEAR DEAD

Recent Films and Videos by Michael Wawzenek
Filmmaker in attendance!

Wawzenek_BreakboneFever_Still_nightingalewebsite

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, December 16th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Chicago-based filmmaker Michael Wawzenek who brings recent work on video and 16mm, including an expanded cinema 16mm projector performance.

His work investigates the precipice between life and death, translates into video the emotions of near-death experiences and examines what it means to be present.

Come see an all encompassing sunrise, a glitter glitch fist, a video re-make of a John Cage classic, and a 16mm tribute to Peter Hutton.

TONIGHT ONLY – LIVE! expanded cinema performance including sounds by M. Azzarello !

 

Program Details:

No Gloves (2016, 16mm, silent, 3 min)
In memory of Peter Hutton.

Breakbone Fever (2013, video, 7 min)
An all consuming fever takes its toll as it transfixes and grows. A recreation of my experience contracting Dengue Fever via the sights and sounds of Bali.

Blue Island  (2014, video, 7 min)
A meditation on abruptness and loss. From Blue Island Ave in Chicago to the Mississippi Swamps. In Memory of Robert Johnson and Bessie Smith.

Interleukin 1 (2016video, 3 min)
The fist is clenched, but how do you defeat an attack from within?

be (w)here (2015, 16mm on video, 6 min)
A question, a command, a caution.
In collaboration with Traci Hercher.

4’33” 4:3 (2015, video, 5 min)
After John Cage.

NEAR DEAD (2016, 16mm, ~10 min)
Live projector performance with live audio by M. Azzarello

Risings (2012, video, 20 min)
Foreigners are impressed, Thai children are impressed upon and all the while one man sits obstinately. Three unadulterated looks at the rise of globalization as seen from the streets of Thailand.

 
Total runtime ~1hr

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, video

MASCULINITY/FEMININTY

Filmmaker Russell Sheaffer in attendance

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, December 8th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

Masculinity/Femininity is an experimental documentary that challenges normative notions of gender, sexuality and performance. Experimental filmmaker Russell Sheaffer’s Masculinity/Femininity takes over where his short film starring James Franco, Masculinity & Me, left off. Shot mainly on Super 8mm film, this is not a typical documentary. Sheaffer asks filmmakers, academics, gender theorists, and artists to present their concepts of gender construction in what works as a sort of performance piece rather than as full-on narrative. In fact, the filmmakers themselves question whether Masculinity/Femininity is scripted or not.

Whether through monologue, visual art, performance art, or storytelling, individuals including B. Ruby Rich, Susan Stryker, Barbara Hammer, John Greyson, Chris Vargas and Yvonne Tasker represent the personal experiences they have had with gender-normative societal constructs. Each performance is unique, but somehow viewers will be able to see something of themselves in each one.

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Runtime: 88mins
HD Digital Projection.

Programmed by Raul Benitez.



Filed under: 8mm, artist in attendance

MOVEMENT MATERIAL

Camera/Dance Works by Jeremy Moss & Pamela Vail
Artists in Attendance!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, December 7th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Jeremy Moss and Pamela Vail to present a 60-minute program of video, 16mm projection, and live performance that highlights transfigurative gestures via the collision of camera and dance. This program explores the roles and functions of both the cinematographer (Jeremy Moss) and the dancer (Pamela Vail) while engaging questions of space, movement, and the ways in which the frame and the cut create alternate walls and rhythms. The progression of this camera/dance collaboration has led the artists to pointedly examine equality, balance, interactivity, and reciprocity between both forms.

Jeremy Moss and Pamela Vail have been actively collaborating since the fall of 2008 and their collective films and videos have shown at prominent national and international festivals including Experiments in Cinema, Crossroads in San Francisco, Cucalorus, Next Dance Cinema, Cinedans in Amsterdam, Arkipel in Jakarta, and at renowned North American venues such as the Northwest Film Forum, San Francisco Cinematheque, Vox Populi in Philadelphia, and Echo Park Film Center.

Their non-narrative visual explorations investigate and present the singular moving body via structural camera and rhythmic editing. Both durational and intense, phrasing of movement and cutting range from assaulting and severe to meditative and lulling. Through this program, the artists ask: how do/can camera and movement inform the other, and offer new possibilities without favoring one over the other? Can the camera act as a dynamic partner, more than simply a new “stage” or documenting device for the dancer? Can the dancer be more than a subject embedded within the frame and altered by the cut? What is the role of location when considering the duet between dancer and camera? How can the dance film continue the early investigations of camera and movement radically propelled by Maya Deren in the twentieth century.

(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, collaboration, dance, experimental, hand-processing, landscape, music, performance, place, rural, sound, Uncategorized, video

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