1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

PETER HUTTON

Swimming in the Valley of the Moon
White Light Cinema and the Nightingale
present Three Films by Peter Hutton

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, November 20th, 7 pm, $7-10

This year, the experimental film world lost one of its keenest eyes.

Peter Hutton was an elegant ruffian, a casual radical, insistent on looking deeply, on seeing as seeking, on stilling oneself and attuning one’s sense of time to match the place. The films tonight, like most of his oeuvre, are presented in silence.

Hutton’s films find their place in the trajectory of landscape art. The twin artistic influences that dominated Hutton’s early creative life were East Asian aesthetic philosophies and his experience as a merchant marine. He remarked often that this trained him to see. It was a skill that he continued to hone over four and a half decades. He worked slowly: shooting and exploring, watching and re-watching, maintaining and honing a clarity of vision as patient as it was explorative. His films are transportive—not simply to the times and places of their making, but for our senses of seeing. This work is gorgeous—it can make celluloid fetishists of the most hardened viewer—and leaves the viewer in a state of grace, unencumbered by trying to explain its virtues. In addition to the internal composition and tonality of his images, his film are guided by his dedication to revealing stillness in motion and motion in stillness, a devotion to the poethics of sequence and a trust in both his subjects: those opposite his lens and those before the screen. We are made more patient through his films.

Tonight’s screening features a very early work, made in graduate school, which diaristically traces his life at the time and his Bay Area countercultural milieu; one of the many excellent films he made of the eponymous river over the thirty-plus years he lived in the Hudson River Valley, teaching at Bard; and a city symphony for Łódź in the midst of a transformation. We hope you can join us for this too-rare opportunity to honor the life and work of Peter Hutton. (JM)

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Filed under: 16mm, autobiography, documentary, environmental, experimental, film, travel

CANTOS

Recent 16mm Films by Margaret Rorison
Filmmaker in Attendance!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 18th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Margaret Rorison to present a program of short films shot on 16mm from 2012-2016. Many of these works have developed from travel and explorations through rural and urban landscapes and function as odes to memories of experience. Some films are explorations of the relationship between time and the frame, between pacing and cut and of memory … Sound is an important component to these works as well. Rorison has composed many of the soundtracks with the use of field recordings, contact mics and lucid narrations made by her grandfather. One of her most recent films, Memory of August is an ode and portrait study of her 95 year old grandmother, Margaret Bennett, the widow of Harry Bennett who has been another strong influence in Rorison’s earlier work. Prior to filmmaking, Rorison worked primarily with painting and poetry and is interested in exploring these methods of language and thought through the medium of 16mm film.

“Rorison’s works frequently wander through empty or seemingly empty spaces. Her soundtracks—often consisting largely of electronic music on the drone/noise spectrum—often create a sense of warm alienation, coloring the films’ empty landscapes. Rorison’s films abound with “negative space” compositions—shots which frame a “nothing” (for example an empty sky, a wall, water) against borders of dark (shadows, bridges, walls)… this seems to suggest something of a turning away from the world of the social and a turn towards a state of introspection. These films relish solitude and alone-ness, and even while this solitude is sometimes tinged with dread or alienation, even as the filmmaker’s visions tend toward the apocalyptic, this solitude is asserted often as a source of strength.” — Steve Polta, Artistic Director, San Francisco Cinematheque

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Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, archival, artist in attendance, autobiography, documentary, essay, experimental, film, found footage, geography, hand-processing, landscape, literature, music, performance, place, poetry, social justice, sound, surveillance, travel, Uncategorized, video

URINAL

John Greyson’s URINAL
Rescheduled
Presented by White Light Cinema

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 4th, 7 pm, $7-10

White Light Cinema is pleased to present Canadian filmmaker and artist John Greyson’s rarely seen 1988 classic of queer cinema, URINAL, which continues to be one of the most provocative and urgent works made during the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

Program Details:
URINAL (1988, 100 min, Blu-Ray Projection)
Directed by John Greyson

“An assortment of deceased great gay artists from history are mysteriously brought back from the dead and summoned to a Toronto garden to be given a special assignment: to investigate the causes, history and implications of public urinal arrests in Ontario. Over the course of seven evenings, Sergei Eisenstein, Frida Kahlo, Yukio Mishima, Langston Hughes, Frances Loring and Frances Wyle are presented with data relating to a number of gay-issues, including the history of public washroom sex and its policing. Greyson’s first feature, URINAL challenges conventions, drawing on techniques from video, documentary, narrative and experimental film to create a thought-provoking examination of the history and status of gays and lesbians in contemporary society. Winner of the Teddy award at the 1989 Berlin Film Festival.” (Canadian Film Institute)

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Filed under: 16mm, experimental, film, queer, Uncategorized

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