DEAREST CHICAGO …

DEAREST CHICAGO, PLEASE LOVE ME!
YOURS TRULY, DETROIT
A Detroit Mini-Festival
Programmer Brandon Walley in person!

vacancy

Saturday, August 23rd at 6:00, 8:00, & 10:00 pm
$5 per screening or $10 for all

The NIGHTINGALE is delighted to host  Detroit filmmaker and programmer, Brandon Walley, to present 3 separate moving image programs that survey the cultural and physical landscape of Detroit from filmmakers that have lived there and created these works over the past decade. This mini-film-fest titled DEAREST CHICAGO, PLEASE LOVE ME! YOURS TRULY, DETROIT is a retort against the two extremes of content that usually dominate media about Detroit; that of exploitive ruin porn or the over-simplification that Detroit is quickly rising from the ashes.

 Brandon Walley is the Program Director for CORKTOWN CINEMA, the new incarnation of The BURTON THEATRE: an eclectic independent cinema that features art house, avant-garde, LGBT, foreign, local, and cult films. For the past six years he has also acted as the Regional Programmer for Media City International Film Festival in Windsor, Ontario. As a filmmaker, Brandon’s work has been received at film festivals and art exhibitions internationally.

This screening continues a dual city moving image dialogue. Last summer at Trinosophes in Detroit, The Nightingale’s Christy LeMaster presented CHICAGO LOVES DETROIT: Recent Short Film & Video Work from Chicago.

 A series of limited edition broadsides of the programs will be given out on this night, designed by Frances Barber and Brandon Walley with letterpress and poetry by Barber.

Frances Barber resides in Detroit writing plays, poetry and short stories. She co-edits for white print inc, runs Meddah U Press, co-owns Silva Rerum Bookshop and archives for the Woodward Line Poetry Series. Currently, she is editing her first draft of prose titled “Poetolatry” and is in the early production stages of a one-act play.

6pm, PROGRAM 1: WE HOPE FOR BETTER THINGS
CHICAGO DETROIT SPLIT, Thomas Comerford and Bill Brown
(2005, unslit 8mm–>16mm, 10 mins.)
In Chicago Detroit Split, Brown and Comerford find the common ground of shared street names in their respective cities, yet they employ the unslit 8mm format to juxtapose these like-named tracts of land–the juxtapositions allowing for chance encounters across time and space between these two midwestern cities.

I PITY THE FOOL, Brent Coughenour
(2007, super 8mm transfer to video, 83 mins.)
In an effort to improve its image for the nationwide attention brought to the city by the hosting of the 2006 Super Bowl, the city of Detroit began demolishing long-vacant buildings, hastening the natural slow decay caused by decades of industrial collapse. As the city dismantles itself, clues to its past resurface. Collections of scraps sifted from rubble—an archeology of unanswered questions—combine to tell a surrogate narrative filled with missing pieces and forgotten motives, old letters, photographs, and home movies. Fractured moments occurring on one summer day echo events from thirty years earlier. The day is sunny, but it is humid, and clouds are gathering. It is going to rain.

(TRT: 93 mins.)

8pm, PROGRAM 2: LAUGH TO KEEP FROM CRYING
DETROIT BRANDED, Oren Goldenberg and Jonathan Rajewski
(2013, video, 3 mins.)
Detroit Branded, using Google Image search, renders the brand of Detroit into meaninglessness.

ROBOCOP WAS FILMED MOSTLY IN DETROIT, David Gazdowicz
(2004, video, 5 mins.)
Join our narrator as he explores some lesser-known locations around Detroit, all the while entertaining the audience with a lovely reading from the cult classic motion picture script, Robocop. This piece makes light of the fact that Robocop, a film set in the great city of Detroit was actually not filmed there. (A travesty really.) It was actually filmed in… Well you will have to watch to find out.

DETROIT (BLANK) CITY, EP.1: DETROIT POP-UP CITY, Oren Goldenberg and Ari Rubin
(2013, video, 5.5 mins.)
After successfully crowd-sourcing $500,000,000 to save the city of Detroit, Save Detroit Think Tank implements their first plan of action. Special Guest appearances by Dan Gilbert and a Detroit mayoral hopeful.

INVISIBLE CITY, Jack Cronin
(2006, 16mm transfer to video, 11 mins.)
Invisible City was filmed in Detroit over the course of three years. Inspired by Italo Calvino’s Le città invisibili, in which the Italian author suggests that what constitutes a city is not so much its physical structure but the impression it makes upon its visitors. The film is loosely organized into four segments representing spring, summer, fall, and winter.

 THE SMELL OF MOMMY’S HONEY MUFFINS, Brandon Walley
(2007, video, 3.5 mins.)
Mmmm, the sweet smell of Detroit.

EMERGENCY DETROIT, Oren Goldenberg and Ari Rubin
(2013, video, 2.5 mins.)
Governor’s Office Announces Detroit’s Emergency Financial Manager: Live coverage of the press conference that changed Detroit forever.

CITY WITHOUT A PAST, Nicole Macdonald
(2013, video and super 8mm transfer to video, 27.5 mins.)
One residents view of Detroit over the past four years, minus the usual apocalyptic romanticism or hype about the city’s “renaissance”.

DETROIT (BLANK) CITY, EP.2: DETROIT DIAMOND CITY, Oren Goldenberg and Ari Rubin
(2013, video, 6.5 mins.)
Turning problems into solutions, is what Detroiters do.  When car break-ins run rampant, SDTT is ready to create opprotunity….but they are not the only ones.  Special Guest appearances by Kwame Kilpatrick and Joumana Kayrouz.

(TRT: 64.5 mins.)

10pm, PROGRAM 3: Paris Of The Midwest
VACANCY, Brandon Walley
(2006, super 8mm transfer to video, 6.5 mins.)
A moment of Detroit’s history, captured before it’s forgotten.

I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A DREAMER, Sabine Gruffat
(2012, 16mm transfer to video, 78 mins.)
I Have Always Been A Dreamer is an essay film about globalization and urban ecology using the examples of two cities in contrasting states of development: Dubai, UAE and Detroit, U.S.A. Within the context of a boom and bust economy, the film questions the collective ideologies that shape the physical landscape and impact local communities.

Hosted by Christy LeMaster



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, video

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