1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

First Year SAIC MFA Students

The Nightingale will host a screening of first year SAIC MFA students’ film, video, and new media work.

___-STILL

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, May 6th, 7 pm, $7-10

Ranging from experimental documentary to 3D and 2D experimental animation, these films and videos represent the culmination of a year spent in thought and labor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. These works, produced as first year students in the MFA program, explore themes of loss and displacement, the role of the accordion in Chinese culture, and chance operations. Join us for a screening of works completed and in progress, including a live kazoo soundtrack.

Including:

Ricardo Salcedo Martínez – Home(s)
Julia Pello – In the Time//In the House\\ of Slow Sex
Emily Sasmore – ___
Benji Sayed – ihavefailedyouall
Kelsey Velez – Pinwheel
Peng Zuqiang – Accordion Class

Ricardo Salcedo Martínez was born in Cuenca, Ecuador in 1989. He got his undergraduate degree Film at the School of Arts and Social Sciences in Chile. Through fiction, documentary and essay film forms his work often delves into questions of identity, belonging and perception. He is currently studying for his Master’s at SAIC.

Julia Pello is a Russian-born poet and filmmaker who has shown work around the world including at The Getty, Le Centre Pompidou, and the Bangkok International Film Festival among many others. She has collaborated on various audio-visual projects including Hour of Star and Zerkalo and presented live projections at such venues as Cité de La Musique. Julia is currently a Master of Fine Arts candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Emily Sasmore’s work focuses on power relationships. Telling narratives focusing on interpersonal relationships allows her to talk about domination on both a small and large scale. Using both tangible and intangible materials, she brings up the roles that reality and the imaginary play within them. The stories and spaces she creates are meant to leave questions. None of which are answered. By reveling in these interactions, the viewer is asked to enter into limbos, engaging with unending, repetitious power struggles.

Desi-Corean artist Benji is interested in glitch, noise, and game environments to explore concepts of identity loss, alienation, anxiety, and failure.

Kelsey Velez is an MFA candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has screened at Indie Grits in Columbia, SC, New Orleans, LA & in Athens, Greece. She is interested in marrying traditions of representation and abstraction to depict and distort ideas of recreation, diversion and sport.

Peng Zuqiang is a filmmaker and translator born in Changsha, China in 1992. His film and video works speculate and question the potential and condition of collectivism through exploring historical objects and environments. Recent exhibitions include: “De arrogantie van De jeugd” (2015) at Galerie Gabriel Rolt, Amsterdam. “Casual Contradictions” (2014) at MOCA Shijiazhuang, and “The Temporary: 01” (2014), at ARTicle Gallery, Birmingham. His has participated in screenings at Acadia Missa and Chinese Visual Festival, both in London where he completed his BA at Goldsmiths College. He is currently a candidate of MFA in Film at the School of Art Institute in Chicago.

Programmed by Emily Eddy and Kelsey Velez



Filed under: 16mm, animation, documentary, experimental, feminism, film, music, narrative, new media, opening, painting, performance, video

THE REARVIEW MIRROR

OJOBOCA, Samuel Delgado & Helena Girón, Ben Rivers, Ralitsa Doncheva, Josh Gibson

STILL1

Wolkenschatten still 003

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, May 7, 7 pm, $7-10

“I then took another look into the rearview mirror, on my own. And I discovered, somewhat to my surprise, that when you look in the rearview mirror you do not see what has gone passed. You see what is coming. And the rearview mirror is the foreseeable future. It is not the past at all. The title, the phrase “rearview mirror” appears to distort the situation. Most people think of it instinctively from the sound of the phrase, “It must be the past.” In terms of media, of course, the thing that is occupying the foreground in terms of the rearview mirror is nostalgia. Nostalgia is the name of the game in every part of our world today. Nostalgia is not, well it’s a kind of rearview mirror if you like, but it’s also the shape of things to come.” – Marshall McLuhan

The Nightingale is pleased to present this program of short films that have their own particular ways with looking back, while simultaneously sharing in the projection of what lies ahead. Guided by voices via archival recordings, literary renditions, oral histories, and personal testimonies, these modern mythologies strive toward utopian fulfillments, but also present the threats of shifting ecologies that all too often accompany such palpable yet fragile states of being. Please join us for an evening of Chicago premieres as we travel to the small town of Hüllen-Hüllen, the isolated community of Ye on the island of Lanzarote, the remote volcanic Republic of Vanuatu, the Zelenikovsky Monastery in Bulgaria, and the backwaters of North Carolina in search of simply that which makes us come alive.

 

Program Details:

Wolkenschatten
Anja Dornieden & Juan David González Monroy, 2014, 16mm, color, 16:37

In 1984, for three weeks in May, what appeared to be a giant cloud shrouded the small town of Hüllen-Hüllen in darkness. Before the end of the month the cloud had dispersed and life seemed to return to normal. One month later, however, the town was hastily abandoned and its residents were nowhere to be found. They left most of their belongings behind in such a way as to make one think they would return at any moment.

The search that followed led investigators to a cave on the outskirts of town. Inside the cave a number of homemade contraptions were discovered. Connected by a variety of mirrors and fitted with a wide array of lenses, they were found to form a large projection device. Even though at first sight it appeared to be either unfinished or broken, it was eventually determined to be in working order. When it was turned on it projected a series of images over every surface of the cave. Initially the source of the images could not be established, yet upon further examination it was found that the images were engraved directly on the lenses of the machine.

Along with the machine a sheet of paper covered in handwritten text was also found. It was titled “Cloud Shadow”. Beyond the uncertain clues provided by the images and the text, no verifiable explanation for the disappearance of the town’s residents has ever been given. For the sake of preservation the engraved images were transferred onto 35mm slide film. Copies of the text and images were made and archived together. We have been lucky enough to obtain one of these sets. For the benefit of those interested in examining this strange occurrence, we’ve put them together as a narrated slideshow.

Neither God nor Santa María
Samuel M. Delgado & Helena Girón, 2015, 16mm to digital, color, 11:45

Since airplanes did not exist, people moved around using prayers, they went from one land to another and returned early, before dawn. In old audio recordings, the voices of pastors speak of the mythical existence of witches and their travels. In the daily life of a woman the magic of her tales begin to materialize as night falls. Night is the time when travel is possible.

There is a Happy Land Further Awaay
Ben Rivers, 2015, S16mm to digital, color & b/w, 20:10

There Is A Happy Land Further Awaay (2015), captures the landscapes of the remote volcanic Republic of Vanuatu archipelago, before they were devastated by Cyclone Pam in early 2015, the footage becoming a ghostly document of an ecosystem now irrevocably altered.

A hesitant female voice reads a poem by Henri Michaux, recounting a life lived in a distant land, full of faltering and mistakes. Island imagery of active volcanoes, underwater WW2 debris, children playing, and wrecked boats transform into intangible digital recollections of the island, made on the opposite side of the world. Images of the eroded land merge with eroding film, a lone figure on a boat drifts at sea.

Baba Dana Talks to the Wolves
Ralitsa Doncheva, 2015, 16mm to digital, color, 10:38

Baba Dana Talks To The Wolves is an intimate, impressionistic portrait of Baba Dana, an 85 year-old Bulgarian woman who has chosen to spend her life in the mountains, away from people and cities. She lives in one of the oldest monasteries in Bulgaria, Zelenikovsky Monastery. Once known as a favorite place of repose for Bulgaria’s last Tzar, the place is now known as Baba Dana’s home. There are no wolves in this film. There are no wolves left in Bulgaria.

Journey to the Sea
Josh Gibson, 2015, 35mm to digital, color & b/w, 14:23

In Journey to the Sea, an elderly woman floats down a river of elusive memories and fragmented artifacts from cinema‘s history, straining to recall the places that she has been. Passing through childhood creeks and riverside views of great cities, she also struggles to remember the impulse of travel itself. Her fading and fluid memories of touristic desire merge into an unreliable account of a great river teeming with duck-billed platypuses, disappearing Native Americans, fellow tourists and intimate hair washes.

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, archival, documentary, experimental, feminism, film, found footage, international, Uncategorized, video

THE PAST IN RELIEF

Recent Work by Ana Vaz
Ana Vaz in Person!

8-3_A-Idade-da-Pedra_04

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, May 8, 6 pm, $7-10

The work of Ana Vaz confronts our conceptualization of history via themes of colonialism, semiotics, and memory. Vaz creates loose sound and color palettes, imagines impossible pasts, and melds together popular and personal texts all in service of refocusing our understanding of the ages before our own.  She reframes well-known historical realities with elements of utopian fantasy and poetic logic as a window to the contemporary moment and its inheritance of complicated forces.


Program Details:
A FILM, RECLAIMED (Ana Vaz & Tristan Bera, 2015, 20’, HD, sound)

The ecologic crisis is a political, economic and social crisis. It is also cinematographic, as cinema coincides historically and in a critical and descriptive way with the development of the Anthropocene. “A Film, Reclaimed” is a conversation, a pamphlet that reads the terrestrial crisis under the influence and with the help of the beautiful and terrible films which have accompanied it. – AV + TB

 

A IDADE DA PEDRA (2013, 29’, 16mm/HD, sound)

“As artificial as the world must have been when it was created”

A voyage into the far west of Brazil leads us to a monumental structure – petrified at the centre of the savannah. Inspired by the epic construction of the city of Brasília, the film uses this history to imagine it otherwise. “I look at Brasília the way I look at Rome : Brasília began with a final simplification of ruins”. Through the geological traces that lead us to this fictive monument, the film unearths a history of exploration, prophecy and myth. -AV

 

I PREFER NOT TO BE BUT TO TUPI (2015, 20’, performance, video, sound)

Brazilian modernist poet Oswald de Andrade cannibalizes Hamlet in his Anthropophagic Manifesto, a gesture of perspectival shift: Tupi or not not Tupi that is the question. The Amerindian Tupinambá, the Tupi, become the symbolic nexus that roots this shift. Therein, we must remember “we are all indians, expect for the ones who are not”. I Prefer Not to Be but to Tupi is a camouflaged incantation of another film, a literary expansion on and for the cinematic, an opening into a horizon of sonic and textual presences, spectres in/tangled in time and places.  – AV

 

Ana Vaz (b. 1986, Brasília) is an artist and filmmaker whose films and expanded works speculate upon the relationships between self and other, myth and history through a cosmology of signs, references and perspectives. Assemblages of found and shot materials, her films combine ethnography and speculation in exploring the frictions and fictions imprinted upon natural and built environments and its multiple inhabitants. A graduate from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and Le Fresnoy Studio National, Ana was also a member of SPEAP (School of Political Arts), a project conceived and directed by Bruno Latour. Recent screenings include the New York Film Festival – Projections, TIFF Wavelenghts, CPH:DOX, Videobrasil and Lux Salon. In 2015, she was the recipient of the Kazuko Trust Award presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center in recognition of artistic excellence and innovation in her moving-image work.Programmed by Christy LeMaster



Filed under: documentary, experimental, international, narrative, performance, Uncategorized, video

DARK PRISM

Queer Surreal Horror Feature
Director, Dylan Greenberg, in person!

darkprism

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, April 22, 7 pm, $7-10

 

Eighteen year-old director, Dylan Greenberg, describes her movie like this: “DARK PRISM is about three unique and strange women, each battling their own demons, in both a literal and metaphorical sense. Although they exist in different times and perhaps different worlds, their lives will soon collide due to the mysterious appearance of a massive prism. Slowly, the world as one knows it disassembles, and the nonsensical becomes the sensical… Dark Prism features special appearances by Mac DeMarco, Matt and Lauren Katz-Bohen, and Lloyd Kaufman and stars Sofe Cote, Sara Kaiser, Chandani Smith, Stephanie Domini, Max Husten and Wayne Garrett Bal ‘The Jurgen Munster.'”

After the release of a mind-splitting trailer and a spate of high profile press, Greenburg’s strange and wonderfully amateur feature DARK PRISM is now starting to make its way to screens propelled by enthusiastic fans.  Unhinged and sometimes hilarious, DARK PRISM is a movie worth rooting for in its genuine weirdness and visibly collaborative ethos.  Crafted in the infectious tradition of “hey let’s all make a movie,” PRISM is a youthful, queer, self-conscious fever-dream best experienced in a room full of the converted.

Programmed by Christy Castro and Christy LeMaster



Filed under: artist in attendance, experimental, feminism, music, narrative, opening, queer, Uncategorized, video

Next Page »