1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

THE DESTROYING ANGEL

With LOADS by Curt McDowell


Thursday, September 14 at 8 PM, $7-10

 

THE DESTROYING ANGEL (Peter de Rome, 1976)
62 minutes, Digital File

The second and final feature by BFI-recognized experimental/erotic filmmaker and recent documentary subject Peter de Rome, THE DESTROYING ANGEL is a film truly unlike any other. A complete hybrid of horror movie and hardcore, its very loosely Poe-inspired story focuses on priest Caswell Campbell who is on sabbatical from seminary and, feeling torn between the pleasures of the flesh and his call to the cloth, indulges in an escalatingly bizarre series of psychotropic mushroom-feuled sexual experiences, all while being plagued by haunting visions of his doppelganger. Though more of its screen time is spent on sexual acts than in much of de Rome’s other work, THE DESTROYING ANGEL’s sex scenes are anything but traditional, growing increasingly surreal and deconstructed throughout the course of the film, advancing the plot and themes, and functioning as creepy hallucinatory episodes for the viewer. Accurately critically called “a mess but a masterpiece,” THE DESTROYING ANGEL’s weird blend of elements (including over-the-top acting, beautifully-edited psychedelic imagery, and a few jaw-dropping sexual feats) makes for a thoroughly watchable film that manages to be simultaneously campy and artful; erotic, frightening, and fun. (Screening thanks to Bijou Video.)

 

LOADS (Curt McDowell, 1976, released 1985)
19 minutes, 16mm on DVD

With LOADS, Curt McDowell–the preeminent satyr of underground lust–puts his hand, mouth, and camera where the money is: in and out of the underpants of tough, sometimes tender, alluring straight men. Shameless, touching, resplendent in body heat, LOADS remains a rhapsody to fluidity and flexibility, a seminal masterpiece in every way.

Special thanks to his sister Melinda McDowell Milks, who’s generously allowing us to screen it.

Programmed by Julia Zinn and Edward E. Crouse



Filed under: 16mm, experimental, film, history, queer, Uncategorized

INNER DISTANCES

Programmer, Amanda VanValkenburg,
in Attendance

Friday, September 8 at 8 PM, $7-10

Inner Distances, a screening curated by Amanda VanValkenburg, examines how technology affects sense of place and sense of self. Relationships to location becomes abstracted through the mediation of devices. The internet creates familiar landing sites, social media pages become extensions of identity, and google maps can be used to explore topographically accurate recreations of locations around the world. Sense of place is an abstraction of location navigated by information, senses, and physical stimulus. This screening is focused on repurposing devices or software to explore concepts of space and technology, or other strategies that investigate relationships between the virtual and the physical.

This project was developed with support from High Concept Labs.

Program Details:

Parastoo Anoushahpour, Ryan Ferko and Faraz Anoushahpour
Bunte Kuh
(5 min)
Through a flood of images and impressions, a narrator attempts to recall a family holiday. Produced in Berlin and Toronto, Bunte Kuh combines a found postcard, family photo album, and original footage to weave together the temporal realities of two separate vacations.

Johann Lurf
Embargo
(10 minutes)
The oscillating sound of video games, glass facades, barbed wire and high walls that block our view of what goes on behind them. Someone has something to hide here. In EMBARGO we peer over the barriers, past red eyes and CCTV cameras and into state-of-the-art premises of arms and drone manufacturers. The elaborate recording techniques create quite a distinctive spatiality, drifting between distance and closeness. A science-fiction nightmare, dangerously close to reality.

Orr Menirom
Clinton and Sanders Looking at the World and Naming Things for the First Time
(11 minutes)
This short video is based on a CNN debate which took place in April 2016 between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The visuals of the debate have been removed and replaced with a series of dreamlike images. Paired with this alternative footage, the politicians’ words narrate a new and personal story, revealing the subconscious of the politicians. The debate turns into a Rorschach test onto which viewers can project their own thoughts and associations.

Brock Neilson
Reunion 1
(7 minutes)
The artist re-enters a space from their childhood as an adult, freely exploring and reimagining the tone of the space through the lens of an iphone and a year-long process of editing sound and footage on an apple desktop computer.

Daniel Spangler
The Age of Branches
(8 minutes)
A dramatic retelling of systemic collapse, unfolding on the scale of nanoseconds, The Age of Branches examines the American power infrastructure during a crisis of continental proportions, reframing the jargon of its technical port-mortem as mythic language.

Amanda VanValkenburg
Unnatural Disasters
(10 minutes)
A 3D sculpted environment full of architecture caught in the act of critical change. Simulated disasters oscillate on the border between realism and complete artifice with a slow observation of decay. Basing each vignette off of existing locations, the 3D re-enactment allows an destructive intervention that is ephemeral by design.

Calum Walter
Terrestrial
(10 minutes)
The observations of an object in motion: A mobile device captures the trajectories of objects liberated from and bound to land, against a backdrop of uniquely human dissonance. Terrestrial attempts to articulate a desire to transcend bodily limits with electronics and machines, while acknowledging an unavoidable level of dysfunction. The film was inspired by an incident in 2014 where a Blue Line train in Chicago failed to stop at its final destination, the O’Hare airport, and eventually came to a stop halfway up the escalator at the airport’s entrance. Terrestrial re- imagines this accident as an earthbound machine’s failed takeoff.

Blake Williams
Red Capriccio
(7 minutes) 
An anaglyph 3D found footage film about machines and landscape that interlaces motion with stasis, crescendos with glissandos, and reds with blues. Its triangular structure juxtaposes scenes of a parked Chevy Caprice police vehicle, a cruise along Montréal’s infamous Turcot Interchange, and a visit to a basement rave room.

About the Artists:

Parastoo Anoushahpour, Faraz Anoushahpour, and Ryan Ferko have worked in collaboration since 2013. Using various performative structures to work in relation to speci c sites, their projects explore collabora- tion as a way to upset the authority of a singular narrator or position. Currently based in Toronto, recent lm and installation work has been shown at Projections (New York Film Festival), Wavelengths (Toronto Inter- national Film Festival), International Film Festival Rotterdam, Internationale Kurz lmtage Oberhausen (Ger- many), Portland International Film Festival, Media City Festival (Windsor/Detroit), Experimenta (Bangalore), Crossroads Festival (San Francisco), and ZK/U Centre for Art & Urbanistics (Berlin), Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography (Toronto), SPACES Art Centre (Cleveland), and Trinity Square Video (Toronto).

Johann Lurf is an artist and filmmaker, using the moving image to analyse and restructure space and film. His practice involves observational and documentary filmmaking especially in the field of structural film, as well as an approach to found footage which is strongly oriented on filmic language itself. Born in 1982 in Vienna Lurf has studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and the Slade School of Art in London. He graduated from Harun Farocki’s film class in 2009. He received the State Grant of Austria for Video and Media Art and participated in the Artist-in- Residence Programs at the MAK Center for Arts and Architecture in Los Angeles 2011, the SAIC in Chicago 2015 and in Tokyo 2016. His work has been shown internationally and recognized with awards in numerous exhibitions and festivals.

Orr Menirom’s work explores the border between what is real and what is barely or beyond perceptible. Mixing appropriated materials with self shot footage, she cuts and pastes sentences and uses other people’s words to question language as the border between the political and the existential. Originally from Tel Aviv, Israel, Menirom is an alumna of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (2016), the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA, 2014), Kuvataideakatemia (exchange student, 2009) and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (BFA, 2010). She was a 2016-17 research fellow at the Jan Van Eyck Academy (NL). Solo and two person shows include The Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, Des Moines Art Center (IA), Aspect/Ratio Gallery (IL) and Fafa Gallery (Helsinki, Finland). Screenings include the International Film Festival Rotterdam (NL), Expo Chicago (IL) and Chicago Underground Film Festival (IL). Awards include a New Artist Society Merit Scholarship, Toni and Tim Urban Artist-in-Residence and an Anna Louise Raymond Fellowship.

Brock Neilson grew up in a rural part of Idaho and is currently based in Salt Lake City. They typically work in abstract sound, costume-making, drag performance and electronic music.

Based in a diverse and expanding multimedia practice, Pennsylvania-born artist, musician, and writer Daniel Spangler creates speculative, narrative-based works that examine the construction of personal and mass-media languages used by humans to reconcile themselves with the complexities of the natural world–a process by which storytelling arises as an emergent phenomena. Formerly a visual effects artist, he attended the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, and later received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was awarded the New Artists Society Fellowship. His work has been exhibited and screened at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Anthology Film Archives in New York, the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago, and many others.

Amanda VanValkenburg uses her background in painting and drawing to inform her work with 3D software to make videos that play in the uncanny valley. Her work has been shown in the MCA, Mana Contemporary, the Gene Siskel, the Elmhurst Museum, the Nightingale, 6018 North Gallery, Links Hall, LeRoy Neiman Center Gallery, and the Chicago Digital Media Festival. She was recently a High Concept Labs sponsored artist and an Oxbow Artist in Residence.

Calum Walter is an artist focusing on sound and the moving image. He has a BFA from the University of Colorado where he studied filmmaking with an emphasis on sound, and later received a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work has screened at places including the New York Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Rencontres Internationales Paris/Berlin, Hong Kong Arts Centre, Slamdance, FIC Valdivia, and Ann Arbor Film Festival. He lives in Chicago and teaches in the department of Radio, Television and Film at Northwestern University.

Blake Williams was in born in Houston, Texas and currently lives, works, and writes in Toronto, Canada, where he is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute. His stereoscopic videos propose mutant and imaginary histories of representational media by exploring the buried or ‘useless’ functionalities of visual technologies. His work has screened at venues such as the Toronto International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Locarno Festival, and International Short Film Festival of Oberhausen.



Filed under: animation, architecture, artist in attendance, collaboration, experimental, geography, new media, Uncategorized

THE TUBA THIEVES

Director, Alison O’Daniel, in attendance!

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, August 18, 8 PM, $ 7-10

The Nightingale is thrilled to present a screening of Los Angeles artist Alison O’Daniel’s The Tuba Thieves. O’Daniel’s long-term film project The Tuba Thieves, made in the wake of tuba robberies from Los Angeles schools, elliptically connects the story of a deaf drummer to the students, band directors, and school communities who must reconcile with missing sound following the thefts. The film is composed of portraits of music and silence in Los Angeles and beyond, and is interrupted by fictionalized re-enactments of two historic concerts: the 1952 premiere of John Cage’s 4’33” at the Maverick Concert Hall in Woodstock, NY and a 1979 punk concert hosted by Bruce Conner at The Deaf Club in San Francisco.

Reversing the typical process wherein a composer responds to filmic imagery, O’Daniel commissioned musical scores by three composers and worked ‘backwards”, accumulating a narrative through a process of deep listening. First-hand accounts and real life details from collaborations with students, musicians, composers, and actors are continuously altering the narrative, which is filmed in segments over time, eventually forming a feature length film. Featuring scores by Ethan Frederick Greene, Christine Sun Kim and Steve Roden.

Total running time: 52 minutes

Poster by Caroline Walp

ALISON O’DANIEL is a visual artist working across film, sculpture, performance and music, inviting audiences and collaborators to navigate, de-construct and re-imagine sound. Her current project The Tuba Thieves is composed of narrative film, performance and sculptures based on commissioned musical scores made in response to an epidemic of tuba thefts occurring in Los Angeles high schools.

She has presented solo exhibitions at Art In General, New York; Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles; Centre d’Art Contemporain Passerelle, Brest, France and performances at the Hammer Museum, Knockdown Center, and Art Los Angeles Contemporary. She received a BFA in Fibers and Material Studies from the Cleveland Institute of Art, a Post-graduate Diploma of Fine Art from Goldsmiths College, University of London, and a MFA in Studio Art from UC Irvine, CA.



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, music, narrative, Uncategorized, video

! ! ! GARAGE SALE ! ! !

The Sale of a Thousand
Interesting & Useful Objects
Benefitting the Nightingale & Co

Saturday & Sunday, August 12 & 13, 10 AM – 3 PM

Join us as we clean house and raise a little dough. AV equipment, furniture, cameras, clothes, dishes, books, art supplies, housewares.

Good tunes, occasional snacks, and visiting provided. It has been too long since we have seen each other’s faces. HAGGLING ENCOURAGED!

 



Filed under: poetry, potluck, queer, Uncategorized

MOST OF THE SOULS…

MOST OF THE SOULS THAT LIVE HERE
Recent Hungarian Narrative

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, July 29, 8 pm, $7-10

The renowned anarchist Count Ervin Batthyany reappears 100 years after his death. He tries to put his theories into practice again, as he realises that the world has not turned out as he’d expected. But the ideal of freedom and equality awakens the same fears in the choreographers of power as it did 100 years ago. And after an encouraging start the count and his new friends come up against more and more obstacles.

Programs Details:
MOST OF THE SOULS THAT LIVE HERE
Directed by: Igor Buharov, Ivan Buharov
Duration: 1h: 33m
Year: 2016

It has been more than 19 years that I have been working together, under the pseudonym of Igor and Ivan Buharov. We have been producing and directing several films. (experimentals, features, shorts, documentaries, animations) We have also been involved in the creation of several music projects and film music. Our works always dancing on the edge of fine art and cinematic art. In 1995, together with Vasile Croat and István Nyolczas, we have formed the 40 Labor “Multiartist” Group which made performances, events, actions, exhibitions, concerts, multimedia works. We held surrealistic audiovisual performances where the image, the music and the words became an organic whole after chaos. “A generation earlier, the Hungarian underground masters who influenced them were equally overlooked. There is an air of “self­censorship” about the Buharovs; in times of entrepreneurial globe­trotting art, they reflect an era when artists used film with the hope of reaching wide and nourishing the roots of their own culture. “ Vassily Bourikas “This audiovisual experiment can best be described as getting lost in someone else’s dream. The directors Igor and Ivan Buharov invite us to see the insides of their brains through various amusing and absurd story­lines.” Off­screen film festival Brussel In the beginning we have started by using used expired raw material exploiting the organising element of the unintentional. For our films, we mainly use super 8 footage, then we blow it up to 35 mm for distribution use. We are also composing music for the soundtrack of our films. We formed the Pop Ivan band in Budapest in 1998. Our music is characterised by a certain permeability between styles and atmospheres : one can discover in their works archaic Moldvan melodies, Latin rhythms, elements of the modern free­jazz and of contemporary compositions. At our performances we frequently use visual effects : the audience can watch super 8 or/and 16 mm films parallel to listening to the music of Pop Ivan. Our debut album was released in 2001 entitled Hospital Hungary, the second was was Dreamhunting in 2009. Since 2000 we have been giving concerts in Europe, have played in Belgium, France, Slovenia, Croatia, Austria the Czech Republic, Italy, Russia, and Georgia.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:
Igor Buharov ​(Kornél Szilágyi ) 1971 Education 2004 – 2010 Intermedia Department, Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts, Budapest 1990 – 1992 Chef, Rózsa Károly Technical School for Catering Activities 2007 – 2010 Board Member of Studio of Young Artists Association 1999 – Feature Film Directors Association member, part of the Hungarian Moving Picture Foundation 1997 – 2000 Board Member, Hungarian Independent Film and Video Association

Ivan Buharov​(Nándor Hevesi)1974 Education 1993 – 1997 Teacher of visual culture BA, EKTF Eger 2006 – 2007 Dharma Gate Buddhist University Budapest 2009 – 2010 Teacher of visual culture MA, EKTF Eger Activities 2001 – Member of the Studio of Young Artists Association 1999 – Feature Film Directors Association member, part of the Hungarian Moving Picture Foundation 1997 – 2000 Board Member, Hungarian Independent Film and Video Association

Screening with Zsuzsanna Szegedi’s shorts CRISIS OF THE FREE SPIRIT and CRISES OF THE VISIBLE.

Zsuzsanna is a recent MFA graduate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (I actually graduate the next day; but close enough) Her installation “The film I brought back from Hungary” is currently on view at the Sullivan Galleries. Zsuzsanna’s shorts being presented at Nightingale capture abstractions of language, autonomy, and their absence—the absence of the individual voice. These pieces are part of a bigger series exploring the limitations, imprisonment of incomprehension, voicelessness, while using appropriated voices, texts, interviews as medium.



Filed under: Uncategorized

TWO NODES…

TWO NODES ON THE NOISE AXIS
Shorts from Providence and
Tampa’s Sub-Underground

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, July 20, 8 pm, $7-10 suggested donation
(includes an original Risograph poster by Chris Day)

The Nightingale presents a program of shorts by artists active within the orbit of the American sub-underground music and comics scene. All hail from Providence, Rhode Island or Tampa, Florida, two hubs of outré DIY culture typified by the reclamation of public or abandoned space as a site for creative expression, a lo-fi aesthetic imbued with the oozy runoff of junk science fiction and horror, and a festering occlusion from the cultural trends of our great nation’s more fashionable big cities. Rhode Island and Florida are 2/3 of what the liner notes of the 2006 noise compilation Rare Youth lovingly refers to as the “noise axis”, a triumvirate completed by California.

The films of Xander Marro/Mat Brinkman and Leif Goldberg are rapid fire assaults on the senses, filmic reflections of the exquisite, dayglo aesthetic of legendary Providence experimental living/art spaces Fort Thunder and Dirt Palace and the affiliated comics/noise/art collectives Paper Rodeo and Forcefield. The homemade videos of Carlos Gonzalez swim within the same swamp water of his maddeningly prolific music and comics output—loner Americana, fluidity between the netherworld of dreams and profane reality, and a good dose of macabre humor. Cameron Worden, an invaluable fixture of Chicago’s cinematic community as a projectionist, programmer, and, not least, maker, rounds out our evening with a dual Super 8mm performance of psycho-mush and mangled tape warbling.

The total running time of the screening is 60 minutes. Give an hour for art!

Starting at 8:30 sharp.

Featuring shorts by Carlos Gonzalez, Leif Goldberg, Cameron Worden and Xander Marro in collaboration with Mat Brinkman. Original poster design by Chris Day.

(more…)



Filed under: Uncategorized

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