1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

UPGRADE SOUL – BOOK TOUR

A Multimedia Event
Featuring Ezra Claytan Daniels
and Ben Passmore

Tuesday, October 9 at 8 PM, Free

The Nightingale is delighted to welcome back Ezra Claytan Daniels as he celebrates the book version of his inventive graphic novel Upgrade Soul. Originally released as an interactive iPhone App, the innovative sci-fi story follows an aging couple in the aftermath of an experimental operation to clone themselves gone awry. Daniels asks probing questions about what shapes our identity -Is it the capability of our mind or the physicality of our bodies? Is a newer, better version of yourself still you? This page-turning graphic novel follows Hank and Molly as they discover the harsh truth that only one version of themselves is fated to survive.

Touring with Daniels is Philadelphia-based cartoonist Ben Passmore reading from his comic-collection released in March of 2018, Your Black Friend and Other  Strangers. Passmore masterfully tackles comics about race, gentrification, the prison system, online dating, gross punks, bad street art, kung fu movie references, beating up God, and lots of other grown-up stuff with refreshing doses of humour and lived relatability. These comics are essential, humorous, and accessible, told through Passmore’s surreal lens in the vibrant full-color hues of New Orleans.

(more…)



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, expanded cinema, Free Screening!, literature, narrative, new media, reading, science, social justice, Uncategorized, video

BAIL OR NO?

A Skate Media Inspired Shorts Program

Sunday, October 14 at 8:00 PM, $7-10

Bail or No? takes its name from a moment of indecision, the intuitive, instinctual moment where one decides to either bail from a skate trick or to ride it out. The shorts assembled as part of this program, while disparate in their approaches and proximity skateboarding, ruminate on the spirit of skating, namely the ways in which it has embraced individual and idiosyncratic contributions to the form and how the very practice of skateboarding insists on risk in the face of both futility and injury.

Bail or No? is an experimental shorts program in the guise of a collage film, with concrete and asphalt video-poetry riffing on the aesthetics of skate media, DIY culture, bailing as a form, and the metaphor of micro-rebellion. Aware that such rebellions are easily commodified and co-opted, the program is nonetheless knit together by a mutual spirit—that having to bail is okay, but to move without risk or chance, is to throw in the towel regardless.

Featuring contributions by Brandon Alvendia, Liz Cambron, Chris Johanson, Joe Castrucci with Future Islands, Molly Colleen O’Connell, Rick Silva and Jordan Tate, Jennifer Chan, John Auer, Dina Kelberman, Caitlin Ryan, Jacob Riddle, Rick Charnoski, Philippe Blanchard, Thad Kellstadt, KC Milliken with Eric Fleischauer, and surprise cameos by many more. Programmed by Chris Reeves and Aaron Walker.

Total screening time: 60 minutes



Filed under: anarchy, animation, artist in attendance, experimental, new media, Uncategorized, video

Can’t Stand The Midwest

A Program in Two Sides 

Wednesday, July 18 at 8 PM, $7-10

“The sins of the Midwest: flatness, emptiness, a necessary acceptance of the familiar. Where is the romance in being buried alive? In growing old?”
Stewart O’Nan, Songs for the Missing

“A lot of people see it as a kind of failure to stay in the place where you’re from, especially if you’re from the Midwest. Like ambition is geographic.”
Leah Stewart, The History of Us

Can’t Stand The Midwest / The Midwest Can Be Alright is a two volume shorts program that considers the relationship between cultural production and place, specifically within the geographic boundaries of the Midwest. Conceptualizing the screening as a 7-inch single, in which our A and B sides are the appropriately dialectic 70’s Hoosier punk anthems “Can’t Stand The Midwest” by Dow Jones & The Industrials and “The Midwest Can Be Alright” by the Gizmos, the works assembled here consider Midwestern aesthetics from the inside out, mulling on the braided sense of possibility and frustration that, for many, comes with putting down roots in the region.

The program embraces notions of regionalism, not necessarily as a signifier of the parochial or provincial, but rather as a means of describing how artistic communities are formed, informed, maintained, defined and abandoned. Subjects given their due include: the underlying psychedelia of Bible Belt truck stops, the spurious aims of urban planning and psychological effects of segregation, corncob architecture, post-Fordist bricolage, a Chicago River boat tour haunted by the specter of the European refugee crises, and the illumination of avant-garde holdouts in the suburbs.

Can’t Stand The Midwest / The Midwest Can Be Alright features works cultivated in experimental arts communities throughout the region, highlighting the practices of artists hailing from various corners, sides and middles of Indiana, Ohio, Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Michigan.

Program One (Total Screening Time: 65 minutes)
Mike Gibisser, Travel Stop, 2017, 16mm transfer, 18:00
Barry and Todd Kimm, Pronounce It Hard, 1992, 16mm transfer, 11:00
David Robbins, Public Service Announcement (Avant Garde Suburb), 2014, 1:39
Cecelia Condit, Possibly In Michigan, 1983, 12:00
Emily Drummer, Histories of Simulated Intimacy No. 1, 2017, 8mm to HD, 11:00
Ian Curry, Fantasy On The Bun, 2014, 16mm double projection, 7:20

Special thanks to the Chicago Film Archives, Video Data Bank and Platform Studio for their contributions and generosity.

(Don’t miss Part 2, on July 25!)
(cover image courtesy Mike Gibisser)
(programmed by Aaron Walker)



Filed under: Uncategorized

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