1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

MOST OF THE SOULS…

MOST OF THE SOULS THAT LIVE HERE
Recent Hungarian Narrative

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, July 29, 8 pm, $7-10

The renowned anarchist Count Ervin Batthyany reappears 100 years after his death. He tries to put his theories into practice again, as he realises that the world has not turned out as he’d expected. But the ideal of freedom and equality awakens the same fears in the choreographers of power as it did 100 years ago. And after an encouraging start the count and his new friends come up against more and more obstacles.

Programs Details:
MOST OF THE SOULS THAT LIVE HERE
Directed by: Igor Buharov, Ivan Buharov
Duration: 1h: 33m
Year: 2016

It has been more than 19 years that I have been working together, under the pseudonym of Igor and Ivan Buharov. We have been producing and directing several films. (experimentals, features, shorts, documentaries, animations) We have also been involved in the creation of several music projects and film music. Our works always dancing on the edge of fine art and cinematic art. In 1995, together with Vasile Croat and István Nyolczas, we have formed the 40 Labor “Multiartist” Group which made performances, events, actions, exhibitions, concerts, multimedia works. We held surrealistic audiovisual performances where the image, the music and the words became an organic whole after chaos. “A generation earlier, the Hungarian underground masters who influenced them were equally overlooked. There is an air of “self­censorship” about the Buharovs; in times of entrepreneurial globe­trotting art, they reflect an era when artists used film with the hope of reaching wide and nourishing the roots of their own culture. “ Vassily Bourikas “This audiovisual experiment can best be described as getting lost in someone else’s dream. The directors Igor and Ivan Buharov invite us to see the insides of their brains through various amusing and absurd story­lines.” Off­screen film festival Brussel In the beginning we have started by using used expired raw material exploiting the organising element of the unintentional. For our films, we mainly use super 8 footage, then we blow it up to 35 mm for distribution use. We are also composing music for the soundtrack of our films. We formed the Pop Ivan band in Budapest in 1998. Our music is characterised by a certain permeability between styles and atmospheres : one can discover in their works archaic Moldvan melodies, Latin rhythms, elements of the modern free­jazz and of contemporary compositions. At our performances we frequently use visual effects : the audience can watch super 8 or/and 16 mm films parallel to listening to the music of Pop Ivan. Our debut album was released in 2001 entitled Hospital Hungary, the second was was Dreamhunting in 2009. Since 2000 we have been giving concerts in Europe, have played in Belgium, France, Slovenia, Croatia, Austria the Czech Republic, Italy, Russia, and Georgia.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:
Igor Buharov ​(Kornél Szilágyi ) 1971 Education 2004 – 2010 Intermedia Department, Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts, Budapest 1990 – 1992 Chef, Rózsa Károly Technical School for Catering Activities 2007 – 2010 Board Member of Studio of Young Artists Association 1999 – Feature Film Directors Association member, part of the Hungarian Moving Picture Foundation 1997 – 2000 Board Member, Hungarian Independent Film and Video Association

Ivan Buharov​(Nándor Hevesi)1974 Education 1993 – 1997 Teacher of visual culture BA, EKTF Eger 2006 – 2007 Dharma Gate Buddhist University Budapest 2009 – 2010 Teacher of visual culture MA, EKTF Eger Activities 2001 – Member of the Studio of Young Artists Association 1999 – Feature Film Directors Association member, part of the Hungarian Moving Picture Foundation 1997 – 2000 Board Member, Hungarian Independent Film and Video Association

Screening with Zsuzsanna Szegedi’s shorts CRISIS OF THE FREE SPIRIT and CRISES OF THE VISIBLE.

Zsuzsanna is a recent MFA graduate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (I actually graduate the next day; but close enough) Her installation “The film I brought back from Hungary” is currently on view at the Sullivan Galleries. Zsuzsanna’s shorts being presented at Nightingale capture abstractions of language, autonomy, and their absence—the absence of the individual voice. These pieces are part of a bigger series exploring the limitations, imprisonment of incomprehension, voicelessness, while using appropriated voices, texts, interviews as medium.



Filed under: Uncategorized

TWO NODES…

TWO NODES ON THE NOISE AXIS
Shorts from Providence and
Tampa’s Sub-Underground

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, July 20, 8 pm, $7-10 suggested donation
(includes an original Risograph poster by Chris Day)

The Nightingale presents a program of shorts by artists active within the orbit of the American sub-underground music and comics scene. All hail from Providence, Rhode Island or Tampa, Florida, two hubs of outré DIY culture typified by the reclamation of public or abandoned space as a site for creative expression, a lo-fi aesthetic imbued with the oozy runoff of junk science fiction and horror, and a festering occlusion from the cultural trends of our great nation’s more fashionable big cities. Rhode Island and Florida are 2/3 of what the liner notes of the 2006 noise compilation Rare Youth lovingly refers to as the “noise axis”, a triumvirate completed by California.

The films of Xander Marro/Mat Brinkman and Leif Goldberg are rapid fire assaults on the senses, filmic reflections of the exquisite, dayglo aesthetic of legendary Providence experimental living/art spaces Fort Thunder and Dirt Palace and the affiliated comics/noise/art collectives Paper Rodeo and Forcefield. The homemade videos of Carlos Gonzalez swim within the same swamp water of his maddeningly prolific music and comics output—loner Americana, fluidity between the netherworld of dreams and profane reality, and a good dose of macabre humor. Cameron Worden, an invaluable fixture of Chicago’s cinematic community as a projectionist, programmer, and, not least, maker, rounds out our evening with a dual Super 8mm performance of psycho-mush and mangled tape warbling.

The total running time of the screening is 60 minutes. Give an hour for art!

Starting at 8:30 sharp.

Featuring shorts by Carlos Gonzalez, Leif Goldberg, Cameron Worden and Xander Marro in collaboration with Mat Brinkman. Original poster design by Chris Day.

(more…)



Filed under: Uncategorized

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

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