1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

A ROLL FOR PETER

A Tribute Screening for Peter Hutton
Contributors, Michael Wawzenek and           Paul Marcus, in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, March 25th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale is pleased to present A ROLL FOR PETER, a multi-maker, 16mm, black & white tribute to filmmaker Peter Hutton (1944-2016).

Participating filmmakers, Michael Wawzenek and Paul Marcus, in attendance!

Many filmmakers and artists were deeply affected by Peter’s death in June 2016. Twenty-plus former students, colleagues, and admirers of Peter Hutton answered an invitation to shoot A ROLL FOR PETER. The parameters were simple: shoot a single 100 foot roll of 16mm black and white reversal film. The rolls are strung together with black leader separating the rolls, as Peter often separated the single shots in his films. Organized and assembled by Jennifer Reeves and Mark Street, and set on tour thanks to the energies of Eric Theise, this series of pieces speaks to Peter’s strong contemplative aesthetic ethos. Each filmmaker has 2 minutes and 47 seconds of screen time to commune with Peter’s memory, and the collected rolls become more than the sum of their parts.

The organizers write, “Peter Hutton’s contemplative, visually arresting landscape and urban films invite us to take our time within silent cinematic tableaux of place, so that we may discover the beauty of overlooked moments. His carefully composed long-duration shots, whether of city, nature, sea or factory, remind us of the wonder we can discover in the familiar. As we observe with patience, humility and vulnerability, Peter’s work offers us a sanctuary from the frantic, goal oriented state of current visual culture.”

“To me one of the most attractive things about cinema is the fact that you can evoke a sense of mystery, of wonder or curiosity in an environment, a landscape, a room, anyplace, by suspending time. So much of the information that we perceive in film is explained or presented to us in such a way that we can’t help but rationalize it. Once someone leaves us to our own interpretive devices, we can feel a great reprieve and the opportunity to actually give something to the work. It’s like sitting and looking at a painting, at first it might not grab you, but the longer you look at it, the more things reveal themselves.” (Peter Hutton in A Critical Cinema 3, interview with Scott MacDonald)

Program Details:

A Roll for Peter (2016)
16mm and 16mm x 2, black & white, silent, 60 minutes

Participating Filmmakers:
Dominic Angerame, Roddy Bogawa, Cassandra Bull, Jacob Burckhardt, Jesse Cain, David Gatten, Richard Max Gavrich, George Griffin, Eve Heller, Mott Hupfel, Nikolas Jaeger, Amanda Katz & Josh Lewis, Theodore Rex King, Robbie Land, rebecca (marks) leopold, Paul Marcus, Daryl Meador, Mary Beth Reed, Jennifer Reeves, Dave Rodriguez, Peter Rose, Lynne Sachs, Josephine Shokrian, Fern Silva & students, Jordan Stone, Mark Street, G. Anthony Svatek & Zachary Nichols, Eric Theise, Audrey Turner, Michael Wawzenek, Max Weinman & Jake Carl Magee, Timoleon Wilkins

*Catalogues from the Thomas Cole Historic Site screening and tribute on October 9, 2016, which honored and recognized Peter Hutton as a Hudson River Filmmaker, will be available at The Nightingale on Saturday, March 25.

Further information about the film:
http://erictheise.com/films/a-roll-for-peter/

 


Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, dual projection, experimental, film, geography, hand-processing, international, landscape, place, travel, Uncategorized

HAND AND MACHINE

Recent 16mm Films by Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Filmmakers in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 15th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Cinema was the first inescapably mechanical art. But in this post-mechanical age, the traditional apparatus of cinema has all to rapidly been deemed obsolete and primitive. Yet the handing over of industrial machinery to anti-industrial users represents one of the prime creative opportunities for re-appraising and re-interpreting the nature of ourselves as transformed by the age of machines.

Post mechanical age, the humanness of the machine can be made evident. Post mechanical age, machine craft is the new hand craft. The Nightingale welcomes Australian DIY cine experimentalists Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie to present this program of seven recent film works exploring the primitive apparatus of cinema and the relation between hand and machine.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1280285592006760/

Program Details:

Blue Line Chicago
2014, 10 minutes, 16mm
Architectural abstractions of the second city.

Ginza Strip
2014, 9 minutes, 16mm
The Ginza of fable and memory. This is the first film I have finished using the ‘chromaflex’ technique that we developed. This is a very much hands on color developing procedure that allows selected areas of the film to be colour positive, colour negative, or black and white.

LUX
2010, 6 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie
‘L’, ‘U’ and ‘X’ shapes in an inner urban industrial suburb captured on regular 8mm as the old ‘Lux’ stove factory undergoes conversion into more apartments than the brain can comfortably imagine. The rise and fall of industry, the rise and rise of apartments in a seething, pulsating transition.

Crossing
2016, 11 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Across the sea. Across the street. Cross processed super 8 footage of fraught neighbours Korea and Japan in grain focused enlargement.

Invention of the Wheel
2015, 14 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
On man and machine.   On the wheel upon which man turns and is turned.     On ‘homo mechanicus’ – ‘machine man’.

Pancoran
2017, 7 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Jakarta traffic moves with the harmonious chaos of complex self organising entities everywhere. Through contact printer matteing techniques this mass transport becomes denser and denser until only the fluid futility of motion/motionlessness remains.

Jakarta traffic stands as proof of the paradox of motion.

Last Train
2016, 12 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie and Richard Tuohy
Found in the (now lost) archive of Lab Laba Laba, footage from a trailer for the Indonesian film ‘Kereta Api Terakhir’ (The Last Train) melts into a soup of chemigrammed perforations.

A film made in seven cities, and none.

Etienne’s Hand
2011, 13 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy
A movement study of a restless hand. Made from one five second shot. Sound constructed from an old French folk tune played on a hand cranked music box.

Inside the Machine
2016, 12 minutes, 3 x 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Lines. Direct optical sound. An alarm from the past and the voice of the machine.

 

Richard Tuohy (b. 1969, Melbourne, Aus.) began making works on super 8 in the late nineteen eighties. After a brief hiatus from cinema (including formal study in philosophy for seven years) he returned to filmmaking in 2004. Since then he has created almost 40 films.   His films have screened at venues including the Melbourne IFF, EMAF (Osnabruck), Rotterdam IFF, New York FF, Ann Arbor and Media City and he has toured Europe, North America and Asia presenting solo programs of his work. His films are typically highly structured and and have strongly formalist concerns. He is the proprietor of the artist-run film lab nanolab – the only lab for small gauge film in Australia. His works are firmly in the ‘hand-made’ film tradition. An advocate for the possibilities of hand made cinema, Tuohy has devoted much time and effort in sharing his knowledge through workshops and classes both in his native Australia (notably through the Artist Film Workshop in Melbourne of which he is the founder and convener) and internationally. He was also a co-founder of the AIEFF experimental film festival in Melbourne.

As a young person Dianna Barrie found her way into filmmaking as a middle ground between the pursuit of abstract music and philosophy. Ever pushing the limits of the hand processing of super 8 led to the establishment of nanolab with Richard Tuohy, and into the intersection of hand making and industrial cinema technology. This exploration has spread beyond individual work to the establishment of Artist Film Workshop, where celluloid is embraced and advocated by a community of practitioners in Melbourne.

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, hand-processing, international, performance, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized, urban

PETER HUTTON

Swimming in the Valley of the Moon
White Light Cinema and the Nightingale
present Three Films by Peter Hutton

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, November 20th, 7 pm, $7-10

This year, the experimental film world lost one of its keenest eyes.

Peter Hutton was an elegant ruffian, a casual radical, insistent on looking deeply, on seeing as seeking, on stilling oneself and attuning one’s sense of time to match the place. The films tonight, like most of his oeuvre, are presented in silence.

Hutton’s films find their place in the trajectory of landscape art. The twin artistic influences that dominated Hutton’s early creative life were East Asian aesthetic philosophies and his experience as a merchant marine. He remarked often that this trained him to see. It was a skill that he continued to hone over four and a half decades. He worked slowly: shooting and exploring, watching and re-watching, maintaining and honing a clarity of vision as patient as it was explorative. His films are transportive—not simply to the times and places of their making, but for our senses of seeing. This work is gorgeous—it can make celluloid fetishists of the most hardened viewer—and leaves the viewer in a state of grace, unencumbered by trying to explain its virtues. In addition to the internal composition and tonality of his images, his film are guided by his dedication to revealing stillness in motion and motion in stillness, a devotion to the poethics of sequence and a trust in both his subjects: those opposite his lens and those before the screen. We are made more patient through his films.

Tonight’s screening features a very early work, made in graduate school, which diaristically traces his life at the time and his Bay Area countercultural milieu; one of the many excellent films he made of the eponymous river over the thirty-plus years he lived in the Hudson River Valley, teaching at Bard; and a city symphony for Łódź in the midst of a transformation. We hope you can join us for this too-rare opportunity to honor the life and work of Peter Hutton. (JM)

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Filed under: 16mm, autobiography, documentary, environmental, experimental, film, travel

CANTOS

Recent 16mm Films by Margaret Rorison
Filmmaker in Attendance!

funes_el_memorioso

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 18th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Margaret Rorison to present a program of short films shot on 16mm from 2012-2016. Many of these works have developed from travel and explorations through rural and urban landscapes and function as odes to memories of experience. Some films are explorations of the relationship between time and the frame, between pacing and cut and of memory … Sound is an important component to these works as well. Rorison has composed many of the soundtracks with the use of field recordings, contact mics and lucid narrations made by her grandfather. One of her most recent films, Memory of August is an ode and portrait study of her 95 year old grandmother, Margaret Bennett, the widow of Harry Bennett who has been another strong influence in Rorison’s earlier work. Prior to filmmaking, Rorison worked primarily with painting and poetry and is interested in exploring these methods of language and thought through the medium of 16mm film.

“Rorison’s works frequently wander through empty or seemingly empty spaces. Her soundtracks—often consisting largely of electronic music on the drone/noise spectrum—often create a sense of warm alienation, coloring the films’ empty landscapes. Rorison’s films abound with “negative space” compositions—shots which frame a “nothing” (for example an empty sky, a wall, water) against borders of dark (shadows, bridges, walls)… this seems to suggest something of a turning away from the world of the social and a turn towards a state of introspection. These films relish solitude and alone-ness, and even while this solitude is sometimes tinged with dread or alienation, even as the filmmaker’s visions tend toward the apocalyptic, this solitude is asserted often as a source of strength.” — Steve Polta, Artistic Director, San Francisco Cinematheque

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Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, archival, artist in attendance, autobiography, documentary, essay, experimental, film, found footage, geography, hand-processing, landscape, literature, music, performance, place, poetry, social justice, sound, surveillance, travel, Uncategorized, video

ALL ROADS LEAVE WINNIPEG

Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns, Aaron Zeghers
Filmmakers in Attendance!

scott-fitzpatrick-dingbats-revenge

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, October 6th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes experimental / expanded filmmakers Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns and Aaron Zeghers, as they flee the ravaged streets of their fair Winnipeg, in search of a warmer, more exotic climate to present their work. “All Roads Leave Winnipeg” is 7-date film tour featuring expanded cinema performances and single channel films by three of Winnipeg’s most notorious cine-stars, Scott Fitzpatrick, Aaron Zeghers and Clint Enns.

the program//

-Part I – Work by Aaron Zeghers-

Holland, Man.
[2015, 20min, 16mm + Super 8 + Digital + Live Sound]

As two growing years pass, Don Zeghers – farmer from Holland, Manitoba – phases out his multi-generational family farm. With experimental photography on Super 8, 16mm and digital mediums, his son Aaron Zeghers follows this life change. The dissolution of the family farm is seen both intimately but also as a microcosm of the modern industrialized world. Nature is contrasted with industrial might in this sentimental and existential portrait of one’s own family. (This will not be performed in Milwaukee)

Everything Turns…
[2016, 12min, Super8]

From 1 to 12 minutes, ‘Everything Turns…’ is a shorthand study of the mythology of numbers. Scientific tradition is adopted then eschewed for rumours, legends and defunct theories from across the ages. As the days turn to night and the seasons pass, the camera pens a year-long record of space, movement and the passing of time in historic locations around the world. This almanac of anthropomorphic numerology is recorded in-camera onto Super 8 using a myriad of experimental techniques. Just like Richter nearly 100 years ago, we will discover that everything turns, everything revolves and everything feels the deep score of time.

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Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, artist in attendance, documentary, dual projection, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, history, landscape, performance, science, sound, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized

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