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The Work of Emily Eddy &
the Nightingale’s 9th Birthday!!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 1, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us as we celebrate the ninth affordable renewal of our lease with a new series presenting the work of the folks behind the Nightingale. Over the course of the next year, we will treat each programmer to a mini-retrospective as a vehicle to ask you, our community, what this place has been and should become as it nears a decade in existence.

First up is heir apparent, Emily K. Eddy.  She has been curating film, video, and new media works as Co-Director of the  Nightingale since 2013. She is also a film, video, and digital media artist in her own right. This program spans the last four years and includes outside works that heavily inform Emily’s thematic and aesthetic interests.

Emily graduated from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013, where she received her Bachelors in Fine Arts. Combining many different forms of moving image, her work utilizes strategies of video diaries, archival practices, and experimental documentaries. Emily has shown work and programmed screenings at many venues in Chicago, as well as her hometown, Portland, OR, Reykjavik, Iceland, and various mid-western cities. Her most recent curated program, HOW TO FIGHT LIKE A GIRL will be presented at Echo Park Film Center in Los Angeles on March 24.

As always at Nightingale birthdays there will be cake, questionable punch, and dancing.

 

Program Details
No Chick Is An Island
Digital Video, 6:59
2013

I (can?) not be defeated
Digital Video, Super 8mm, 9:02
2013

this must be the place
Digital Video, 6:09
2014

Vesturbæjar
Digital Video, 9:48
2017

 

 



Filed under: 8mm, BIRTHDAY PARTY, experimental, feminism, geography, iceland, icelandic, international, landscape, new media, performance, queer, rural, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

HAND AND MACHINE

Recent 16mm Films by Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Filmmakers in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 15th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Cinema was the first inescapably mechanical art. But in this post-mechanical age, the traditional apparatus of cinema has all to rapidly been deemed obsolete and primitive. Yet the handing over of industrial machinery to anti-industrial users represents one of the prime creative opportunities for re-appraising and re-interpreting the nature of ourselves as transformed by the age of machines.

Post mechanical age, the humanness of the machine can be made evident. Post mechanical age, machine craft is the new hand craft. The Nightingale welcomes Australian DIY cine experimentalists Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie to present this program of seven recent film works exploring the primitive apparatus of cinema and the relation between hand and machine.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1280285592006760/

Program Details:

Blue Line Chicago
2014, 10 minutes, 16mm
Architectural abstractions of the second city.

Ginza Strip
2014, 9 minutes, 16mm
The Ginza of fable and memory. This is the first film I have finished using the ‘chromaflex’ technique that we developed. This is a very much hands on color developing procedure that allows selected areas of the film to be colour positive, colour negative, or black and white.

LUX
2010, 6 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie
‘L’, ‘U’ and ‘X’ shapes in an inner urban industrial suburb captured on regular 8mm as the old ‘Lux’ stove factory undergoes conversion into more apartments than the brain can comfortably imagine. The rise and fall of industry, the rise and rise of apartments in a seething, pulsating transition.

Crossing
2016, 11 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Across the sea. Across the street. Cross processed super 8 footage of fraught neighbours Korea and Japan in grain focused enlargement.

Invention of the Wheel
2015, 14 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
On man and machine.   On the wheel upon which man turns and is turned.     On ‘homo mechanicus’ – ‘machine man’.

Pancoran
2017, 7 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Jakarta traffic moves with the harmonious chaos of complex self organising entities everywhere. Through contact printer matteing techniques this mass transport becomes denser and denser until only the fluid futility of motion/motionlessness remains.

Jakarta traffic stands as proof of the paradox of motion.

Last Train
2016, 12 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie and Richard Tuohy
Found in the (now lost) archive of Lab Laba Laba, footage from a trailer for the Indonesian film ‘Kereta Api Terakhir’ (The Last Train) melts into a soup of chemigrammed perforations.

A film made in seven cities, and none.

Etienne’s Hand
2011, 13 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy
A movement study of a restless hand. Made from one five second shot. Sound constructed from an old French folk tune played on a hand cranked music box.

Inside the Machine
2016, 12 minutes, 3 x 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Lines. Direct optical sound. An alarm from the past and the voice of the machine.

 

Richard Tuohy (b. 1969, Melbourne, Aus.) began making works on super 8 in the late nineteen eighties. After a brief hiatus from cinema (including formal study in philosophy for seven years) he returned to filmmaking in 2004. Since then he has created almost 40 films.   His films have screened at venues including the Melbourne IFF, EMAF (Osnabruck), Rotterdam IFF, New York FF, Ann Arbor and Media City and he has toured Europe, North America and Asia presenting solo programs of his work. His films are typically highly structured and and have strongly formalist concerns. He is the proprietor of the artist-run film lab nanolab – the only lab for small gauge film in Australia. His works are firmly in the ‘hand-made’ film tradition. An advocate for the possibilities of hand made cinema, Tuohy has devoted much time and effort in sharing his knowledge through workshops and classes both in his native Australia (notably through the Artist Film Workshop in Melbourne of which he is the founder and convener) and internationally. He was also a co-founder of the AIEFF experimental film festival in Melbourne.

As a young person Dianna Barrie found her way into filmmaking as a middle ground between the pursuit of abstract music and philosophy. Ever pushing the limits of the hand processing of super 8 led to the establishment of nanolab with Richard Tuohy, and into the intersection of hand making and industrial cinema technology. This exploration has spread beyond individual work to the establishment of Artist Film Workshop, where celluloid is embraced and advocated by a community of practitioners in Melbourne.

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, hand-processing, international, performance, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized, urban

ALL ROADS LEAVE WINNIPEG

Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns, Aaron Zeghers
Filmmakers in Attendance!

scott-fitzpatrick-dingbats-revenge

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, October 6th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes experimental / expanded filmmakers Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns and Aaron Zeghers, as they flee the ravaged streets of their fair Winnipeg, in search of a warmer, more exotic climate to present their work. “All Roads Leave Winnipeg” is 7-date film tour featuring expanded cinema performances and single channel films by three of Winnipeg’s most notorious cine-stars, Scott Fitzpatrick, Aaron Zeghers and Clint Enns.

the program//

-Part I – Work by Aaron Zeghers-

Holland, Man.
[2015, 20min, 16mm + Super 8 + Digital + Live Sound]

As two growing years pass, Don Zeghers – farmer from Holland, Manitoba – phases out his multi-generational family farm. With experimental photography on Super 8, 16mm and digital mediums, his son Aaron Zeghers follows this life change. The dissolution of the family farm is seen both intimately but also as a microcosm of the modern industrialized world. Nature is contrasted with industrial might in this sentimental and existential portrait of one’s own family. (This will not be performed in Milwaukee)

Everything Turns…
[2016, 12min, Super8]

From 1 to 12 minutes, ‘Everything Turns…’ is a shorthand study of the mythology of numbers. Scientific tradition is adopted then eschewed for rumours, legends and defunct theories from across the ages. As the days turn to night and the seasons pass, the camera pens a year-long record of space, movement and the passing of time in historic locations around the world. This almanac of anthropomorphic numerology is recorded in-camera onto Super 8 using a myriad of experimental techniques. Just like Richter nearly 100 years ago, we will discover that everything turns, everything revolves and everything feels the deep score of time.

(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, artist in attendance, documentary, dual projection, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, history, landscape, performance, science, sound, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized

FOLLOW FOCUS

Daviel Shy and THE LADIES ALMANACK
Fall Screening: Exclusive Rough Cut

followfocus

Thursday, November 5, 7 pm, $15
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

The Nightingale is delighted to introduce FOLLOW FOCUS- a new process-oriented screening series that rallies audiences and resources behind a moving-image maker as they complete a feature project. Designed to expand viewership into the production stage, FOLLOW FOCUS invites audiences to observe a director’s process, collaborations, and inspiration.
Our inaugural featured project is THE LADIES ALMANACK written and directed by Chicago-based filmmaker, Daviel Shy and produced by NYC-based artist, Stephanie Acosta.

THE LADIES ALMANACK is a feature- length experimental narrative film shot on Super 8 and based on the novel of the same title by Djuna Barnes. The film is a kaleidoscopic tribute to women’s writing through the friendships, jealousies, flirtations and publishing woes of authors and artists in 1920’s Paris. The Nightingale has hosted 3 screenings over the course of the past year, each one in a different season and highlighting a different element of the process ending with this fourth and final screening, a rough cut of the nearly-completed feature.

With each installment of Follow Focus, the production of a commissioned art object raises funds for the film. Admission price at each of the four screenings includes part of a limited edition, risograph-printed Ladies Almanack Tarot Deck designed and illustrated by Jess LeMaster. Attend all four screenings for a complete 24-card set. Reception with artists to follow the screening.

http://www.theladiesalmanack.com/
http://davielshy.com/
http://www.stephanieacosta.org/
http://jesslemaster.com/

To support the THE LADIES ALMANACK right away, check out the movie’s website.
http://www.theladiesalmanack.com/#!donate/c1ke7



Filed under: experimental, feminism, film, international, queer, Super 8mm, Uncategorized, video

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