1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

SURJ-CHICAGO WORKSHOP

Showing Up for Racial Justice-Chicago Chapter
A World Without Police,
Part 1: History of Policing

Wednesday, October 11 at 6:30-8:00 PM, Free

Want to know why so many Chicagoans are calling for police reform or abolition? Come to SURJ’s first “A World Without Police” workshop: “A History of Policing in Chicago, from 1850 to the 2017.” We’ll explain the racist origins of policing in the United States, study how, decade after decade, the police have systemically targeted black and brown Chicagoans, learn about failed attempts to reform the CPD , and explore how black and brown Chicagoans have led efforts to hold Chicago police accountable for their unconstitutional and violent actions. Led by activists and historians, the workshop will take us to the present moment, addressing ongoing CPD and ICE cooperation, as well as plans for the new police academy

This is the first in a 3-part series, designed to 1) explain why Chicago needs police abolition, 2) introduce Chicagoans to what police abolition looks like in practice (both systemically and individually) and 3) help Chicagoans participate in abolitionist campaigns.

Workshop Dates:
Part One: History of Policing – October 11
Part Two: Alternatives to Calling the Police – October 25
Part Three: Moving to Action, FOP Contract – November 8

REGISTER HERE! https://goo.gl/R3nGuL

-Venue is accessible via the Blue Line, the Milwaukee, Division, & Ashland Buses and there is on-street parking.
– There is a ramp available (upon request) to provide access over the one step into the building.
– The location has one gender-inclusive bathroom, but that bathroom is not ADA compliant.



Filed under: social justice, Uncategorized, workshop

SURJ-CHICAGO WORKSHOP

Showing Up for Racial Justice- Chicago Chapter
Thinking Systemically Workshop

Tuesday, September 26 at 6:30-8:30 PM, Free

While white supremacy & racism like those on display in Charlottesville this August are often easy to identify, the systems that create and feed such horror can be much harder to identify and dismantle — even though these systems exist as part of our everyday lives. To build a just, anti-racist society, we need to learn more about how systemic racism works in our backyard. When we do that, we’re taking another step on our anti-racist journey and standing in solidarity with Charlottesville.

In this workshop we’ll discuss what system-level racism is and how it differs from individual-level racism. We’ll also examine how system-level racism operates in Chicago’s housing, education, and policing. When you leave, you’ll have enough background knowlege to identify what anti-racist, solution-based campaigns you want to join right here in Illinois!

Register Here!: https://goo.gl/forms/nViMTwbrGuve75kK2

-Venue is accessible via the Blue Line, the Milwaukee, Division, & Ashland buses and there is on-street parking.
– There is a ramp available (upon request) to provide access over the one step into the building.
– The location has one gender-inclusive bathroom, but that bathroom is not ADA compliant.



Filed under: social justice, workshop

INAATE/SE/

[it shines a certain way. to a
certain place/it flies. falls./]


Friday, September 22 at 8 PM, $7-10
Part of RUN OF LIFE
Experimental Documentary Series
Director Adam Khalil, in person!

 

History is written by the victors, but this film reminds us
 that the history of the oppressed can still be saved from being extinguished. Native American video artists Adam and Zack Khalil here reclaim the narrative of the Ojibway of Sault Ste. Marie, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, from the archives and museums that would confine it to the past. Using personal interviews, animated drawings, performance, and provocative intercutting, the Khalil brothers’ feature debut makes a bold case for the Ojibway people to be their own storytellers—while seeking a cure for the damage inflicted by colonization—in a spiritual reconnection with tradition.

Read an interview with the makers here.

Program Details:
INAATE/SE/[it shines a certain way. to a
certain place/it flies. falls./]
Directed by Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil.
(2016. USA/Canada, 75 min.)

Adam Shingwak Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Adam’s work has been exhibited at UnionDocs, e-flux, Maysles Cinema, Microscope Gallery (New York), Museo ExTeresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), Spektrum (Berlin), Trailer Gallery (Sweden), Carnival of eCreativity (Bombay), and Fine Art Film Festival Szolnok (Hungary). Khalil is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2011 he graduated from the Film and Electronic Arts program at Bard College.

Zack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, currently based in Brooklyn, NY. His work often explores an indigenous worldview and undermines traditional forms of historical authority through the excavation of alternative histories and the use of innovative documentary forms. He recently completed a B.A. at Bard College in the Film and Electronic Arts Department, and is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar.

 

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, collaboration, documentary, experimental, geography, history, home movies, landscape, narrative, rural, social justice, Uncategorized

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