1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

SURJ-CHICAGO WORKSHOP

Showing Up for Racial Justice-Chicago Chapter
A World Without Police,
Part 1: History of Policing

Wednesday, October 11 at 6:30-8:00 PM, Free

Want to know why so many Chicagoans are calling for police reform or abolition? Come to SURJ’s first “A World Without Police” workshop: “A History of Policing in Chicago, from 1850 to the 2017.” We’ll explain the racist origins of policing in the United States, study how, decade after decade, the police have systemically targeted black and brown Chicagoans, learn about failed attempts to reform the CPD , and explore how black and brown Chicagoans have led efforts to hold Chicago police accountable for their unconstitutional and violent actions. Led by activists and historians, the workshop will take us to the present moment, addressing ongoing CPD and ICE cooperation, as well as plans for the new police academy

This is the first in a 3-part series, designed to 1) explain why Chicago needs police abolition, 2) introduce Chicagoans to what police abolition looks like in practice (both systemically and individually) and 3) help Chicagoans participate in abolitionist campaigns.

Workshop Dates:
Part One: History of Policing – October 11
Part Two: Alternatives to Calling the Police – October 25
Part Three: Moving to Action, FOP Contract – November 8

REGISTER HERE! https://goo.gl/R3nGuL

-Venue is accessible via the Blue Line, the Milwaukee, Division, & Ashland Buses and there is on-street parking.
– There is a ramp available (upon request) to provide access over the one step into the building.
– The location has one gender-inclusive bathroom, but that bathroom is not ADA compliant.



Filed under: social justice, Uncategorized, workshop

SURJ-CHICAGO WORKSHOP

Showing Up for Racial Justice- Chicago Chapter
Thinking Systemically Workshop

Tuesday, September 26 at 6:30-8:30 PM, Free

While white supremacy & racism like those on display in Charlottesville this August are often easy to identify, the systems that create and feed such horror can be much harder to identify and dismantle — even though these systems exist as part of our everyday lives. To build a just, anti-racist society, we need to learn more about how systemic racism works in our backyard. When we do that, we’re taking another step on our anti-racist journey and standing in solidarity with Charlottesville.

In this workshop we’ll discuss what system-level racism is and how it differs from individual-level racism. We’ll also examine how system-level racism operates in Chicago’s housing, education, and policing. When you leave, you’ll have enough background knowlege to identify what anti-racist, solution-based campaigns you want to join right here in Illinois!

Register Here!: https://goo.gl/forms/nViMTwbrGuve75kK2

-Venue is accessible via the Blue Line, the Milwaukee, Division, & Ashland buses and there is on-street parking.
– There is a ramp available (upon request) to provide access over the one step into the building.
– The location has one gender-inclusive bathroom, but that bathroom is not ADA compliant.



Filed under: social justice, workshop

INAATE/SE/

[it shines a certain way. to a
certain place/it flies. falls./]


Friday, September 22 at 8 PM, $7-10
Part of RUN OF LIFE
Experimental Documentary Series
Director Adam Khalil, in person!

 

History is written by the victors, but this film reminds us
 that the history of the oppressed can still be saved from being extinguished. Native American video artists Adam and Zack Khalil here reclaim the narrative of the Ojibway of Sault Ste. Marie, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, from the archives and museums that would confine it to the past. Using personal interviews, animated drawings, performance, and provocative intercutting, the Khalil brothers’ feature debut makes a bold case for the Ojibway people to be their own storytellers—while seeking a cure for the damage inflicted by colonization—in a spiritual reconnection with tradition.

Read an interview with the makers here.

Program Details:
INAATE/SE/[it shines a certain way. to a
certain place/it flies. falls./]
Directed by Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil.
(2016. USA/Canada, 75 min.)

Adam Shingwak Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Adam’s work has been exhibited at UnionDocs, e-flux, Maysles Cinema, Microscope Gallery (New York), Museo ExTeresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), Spektrum (Berlin), Trailer Gallery (Sweden), Carnival of eCreativity (Bombay), and Fine Art Film Festival Szolnok (Hungary). Khalil is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2011 he graduated from the Film and Electronic Arts program at Bard College.

Zack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, currently based in Brooklyn, NY. His work often explores an indigenous worldview and undermines traditional forms of historical authority through the excavation of alternative histories and the use of innovative documentary forms. He recently completed a B.A. at Bard College in the Film and Electronic Arts Department, and is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar.

 

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, collaboration, documentary, experimental, geography, history, home movies, landscape, narrative, rural, social justice, Uncategorized

REVOLUTION IN ROJAVA

US Midwest Speaking Tour 2017
Presented by Chicago Committee for
Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava

Saturday April 22nd at 4:00 pm, $5-10 suggest donation
The Nightingale (1084 N. Milwaukee)

 

Join the Chicago Committee for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava and Black Rose Chicago for a speaking event and fundraiser, to hear eyewitnesses, a YPG volunteer and experts give an up-to-date account of this vital and fascinating struggle, and have your questions about its incredibly complex circumstances answered.

Organizers:
Chicago committe for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava
https://www.facebook.com/ccskr/
Black Rose/Rosa Negra Chicago
https://www.facebook.com/blackrosechicago/

In 2017 the war with fundamentalism rages on for the Syrian Democratic Forces– northern Syria’s multiethnic armed coalition animated by the Democratic Confederalist ideology. They are currently at the threshold of the capital of al-Baghdadi’s brutal “caliphate,” Raqqa.

The northern Syrian territories, liberated from the control of both the Ba’athist regime and local jihadists, are also facing serious challenges, from the direct ground invasion and attacks of Erdoğan’s increasingly authoritarian Turkey to conflict with the Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq, all while struggling to rebuild a ravaged landscape, and still advancing an unprecedented experiment in egalitarian, participatory democracy and the elimination of ancient patriarchical norms.

At the same time, the revolutionaries’ tactical cooperation with imperialist powers, the US and Russia, as well as with the Assad regime, has sparked significant controversy in numerous circles on the left.

LIST OF SPEAKERS:
Mike Fonda
Ferit Kut
Gönül Düzer

BIOS:
Mike Fonda joined the People’s Protection Units (YPG) in the spring of 2015 where he served on the front line in Cizîrê‎ Canton, Syria as an infantryman, linguist and interrogator. Prior to joining the YGP, Mr. Fonda served in the Marine Corps for 6 years as an infantryman and linguist, deploying to Iraq twice and receiving the Purple Heart. After the Marine Corps, Mr. Fonda deployed as a Defense Contractor to Iraq and Afghanistan as a Counterintelligence Specialist. He holds a Master’s Degree in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies from the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Ferit Kut was fired from his position as a lecturer at Dicle University in February 2015 in retaliation for his advocacy for the right to native-language education. He is a PhD candidate in Pedagogy of Early Child Development at Yeditepe University and holds an MA in the same field from Dicle University. Currently, he is a board member of the Kurdish Cultural Center of Illinois.

Gönül Düzer is an activist Zaza woman who grew up in Istanbul, Turkey. She received an International Relations BA at Middle East Technical University and a Global Political Economy MA at University of Kassel. Her master’s thesis was “A Feminist Analysis of Women Workers’ Engagement in Labor Resistances: a Case Study of Istanbul’s Garment Industry”. She has been an activist on labor, gender and immigration issues in Turkey, Germany and the US. She has worked as a waiter, salesperson and labor organizer. Currently she is working as a math tutor in Chicago. She is a board member of the Kurdish Cultural Center of Illinois, and a member of Chicago Committee for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava.



Filed under: anarchy, autobiography, environmental, feminism, international, social justice, Uncategorized

The HARD EARTH

Filmmaker Sally Lawton in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 8th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us for this special premiere screening of The Hard Earth, a feature documentary by Sally Lawton, preceded by The 51st Star, a short 16mm film by Ian Curry.

THE HARD EARTH is an experimental documentary charting the relationship of five Ukrainians and one Ukrainian American to the 2014 revolution and preceding war.

The film is shot over the central and western regions of Ukraine, immediately post-revolution. Six figures explain their relationship to previous and furthering events in their homes and towns. First the Euromaidan protests are discussed as a singular, illuminating event. After abstracted information, stories of the annexation of Crimea, war in the East, and the disillusionment of the USSR, reveal complex portraits.The director examines interpersonal relationships and how the making of the film impacts realizations. The guides and narrations take on specific forms, showing the miniature in global news stories. The elusive categorization of Ukraine, free and yet oppressed is framed by the difficulty and ease of documentation.

SALLY LAWTON is making film and video work in Chicago and grew up in Detroit. She owns Sincerely Productions which makes commercials for local businesses. She has done curatorial work with experimental film and documentary in Chicago. Her academic background is in film and nonprofit studies, graduating from DePaul University in 2013. Her interest in this project began after her friend, Maya Demianczuk, returned from the Euromaidan. Sally began filming interviews primarily for a public archiving project Maya began, which lead to traveling to Ukraine in summer 2015 and collecting material for the film.

IAN CURRY’s moving image work takes inspiration from the many genres within the 16mm format such as: silent, educational, experimental, avant garde, ethnographic, and documentary films. He combines formal strategies gleaned from celluloid’s history through experimentation to produce stunning imagery that embraces the feeling of a memory or reflection. His films use contact printing, multiple exposures, and in-camera editing or feature on the fly remixing with multiple projectors driving the audience down expanded cinema alley. Characterized by unique moments or observations, rushing energies of light, and striking rhythmic edits; concepts of film and performance are married into a raw celluloid trip with 16mm prints, projectors, and double system soundscapes.

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, geography, international, narrative, place, social justice, travel, video

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