1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

The HARD EARTH

Filmmaker Sally Lawton in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 8th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us for this special premiere screening of The Hard Earth, a feature documentary by Sally Lawton, preceded by The 51st Star, a short 16mm film by Ian Curry.

THE HARD EARTH is an experimental documentary charting the relationship of five Ukrainians and one Ukrainian American to the 2014 revolution and preceding war.

The film is shot over the central and western regions of Ukraine, immediately post-revolution. Six figures explain their relationship to previous and furthering events in their homes and towns. First the Euromaidan protests are discussed as a singular, illuminating event. After abstracted information, stories of the annexation of Crimea, war in the East, and the disillusionment of the USSR, reveal complex portraits.The director examines interpersonal relationships and how the making of the film impacts realizations. The guides and narrations take on specific forms, showing the miniature in global news stories. The elusive categorization of Ukraine, free and yet oppressed is framed by the difficulty and ease of documentation.

SALLY LAWTON is making film and video work in Chicago and grew up in Detroit. She owns Sincerely Productions which makes commercials for local businesses. She has done curatorial work with experimental film and documentary in Chicago. Her academic background is in film and nonprofit studies, graduating from DePaul University in 2013. Her interest in this project began after her friend, Maya Demianczuk, returned from the Euromaidan. Sally began filming interviews primarily for a public archiving project Maya began, which lead to traveling to Ukraine in summer 2015 and collecting material for the film.

IAN CURRY’s moving image work takes inspiration from the many genres within the 16mm format such as: silent, educational, experimental, avant garde, ethnographic, and documentary films. He combines formal strategies gleaned from celluloid’s history through experimentation to produce stunning imagery that embraces the feeling of a memory or reflection. His films use contact printing, multiple exposures, and in-camera editing or feature on the fly remixing with multiple projectors driving the audience down expanded cinema alley. Characterized by unique moments or observations, rushing energies of light, and striking rhythmic edits; concepts of film and performance are married into a raw celluloid trip with 16mm prints, projectors, and double system soundscapes.

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, geography, international, narrative, place, social justice, travel, video

CANTOS

Recent 16mm Films by Margaret Rorison
Filmmaker in Attendance!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 18th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Margaret Rorison to present a program of short films shot on 16mm from 2012-2016. Many of these works have developed from travel and explorations through rural and urban landscapes and function as odes to memories of experience. Some films are explorations of the relationship between time and the frame, between pacing and cut and of memory … Sound is an important component to these works as well. Rorison has composed many of the soundtracks with the use of field recordings, contact mics and lucid narrations made by her grandfather. One of her most recent films, Memory of August is an ode and portrait study of her 95 year old grandmother, Margaret Bennett, the widow of Harry Bennett who has been another strong influence in Rorison’s earlier work. Prior to filmmaking, Rorison worked primarily with painting and poetry and is interested in exploring these methods of language and thought through the medium of 16mm film.

“Rorison’s works frequently wander through empty or seemingly empty spaces. Her soundtracks—often consisting largely of electronic music on the drone/noise spectrum—often create a sense of warm alienation, coloring the films’ empty landscapes. Rorison’s films abound with “negative space” compositions—shots which frame a “nothing” (for example an empty sky, a wall, water) against borders of dark (shadows, bridges, walls)… this seems to suggest something of a turning away from the world of the social and a turn towards a state of introspection. These films relish solitude and alone-ness, and even while this solitude is sometimes tinged with dread or alienation, even as the filmmaker’s visions tend toward the apocalyptic, this solitude is asserted often as a source of strength.” — Steve Polta, Artistic Director, San Francisco Cinematheque

(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, archival, artist in attendance, autobiography, documentary, essay, experimental, film, found footage, geography, hand-processing, landscape, literature, music, performance, place, poetry, social justice, sound, surveillance, travel, Uncategorized, video

DIFFICULT BUT POSSIBLE

A Supplement to Rules, Tools and Fools

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, September 18th, 8 pm, $7-10

A selection of shorts surrounding not just the the how-to but to-how. Bearing fully in mind the notion of utopia as a no-place, Difficult but Possible animates the notion of a diffuse set of not-yet-places, of worlds unbuilt, of worlds unbuilding, of the crazy-eyed mirage we keep moving toward. Together, we explore terrains fantastical, domestic, speculative and utopian; we learn to dodge the camera all around us and to stare deeply into and through others; we receive allegories from beyond underground weather and beyond Drop City, venture into cited non-sites and pick up some skills along the way.

Co-presented by Spudnik Press, in conjunction with Rules, Tools and Fools,
curated by Jaclyn Jacunski and Jason Pallas;
made possible through the generosity of the Chicago Film Archives,
and the sense of possibility and adventure of the artists

Programmed by Jesse Malmed

 

Mike Lopez | Whole Earth Land | 2016 | 10 minutes  | Playthrough Performance

Gene Bernofsky | 1993 | 1980 | 9 minutes | 16mm to Video | Sound

JoAnn Elam | The Last Whole Earth Catalog | 1967-1990 | 20 minutes | 8mm to Video | Silent

Jillian Mayer | Makeup Tutorial – How to Hide from Cameras | 2013 | 3.5 minutes | Video | Sound

Sam Green | Clear Glasses | 2008 | 4 minutes | Video | Sound

Jennifer Proctor | Alternative Forms of Energy | 2005 | 5 minutes | Super 8 to Video | Sound

Ben Russell | Trypps 7 (Badlands) | 2010 | 10 minutes | S16mm to Video | Sound

 



Filed under: archival, documentary, environmental, essay, experimental, feminism, geography, hand-processing, history, landscape, lecture, new media, performance, social justice, surveillance, video

The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

Preview Screening and Discussion
with Director Brett Story
Co-presented by Gallery 400

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Run of Life Experimental Documentary Series
Wednesday, June 8, Free
6 pm- Exhibition Viewing / 7 pm- Screening
Gallery 400, 400 S. Peoria, Chicago, IL 60607

Inspired by “our duty to fight”, Gallery 400 and Run of Life are pleased to present Brett Story’s astute and affecting documentary, The Prison in Twelve Landscapes (2016, HD file, 87 min). A longtime prison activist, Story uses a strong structural device to make visible the many sprawling effects of the contemporary American prison system. From the construction of pocket-parks in Los Angeles designed to keep sex offenders out of the neighborhood to a New York City warehouse that specializes in helping families provide care packages to prisoners, The Prison in Twelve Landscapes deftly eschews the romanticized themes of forgiveness traditional to prison documentaries in exchange for the more consequential web of systemic forces buttressing mass incarceration. Story also employs a wide range of documentary tactics; the connections to the prison institution are clearly laid out in some sections of the doc, while others leave more open space for the viewer to build the relationships themselves, a tactic that encourages further interaction with the central ideas of the movie long after the screening has ended. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is an important movie and possibly represents a new and sophisticated mode of social justice documentary making.

“It’s not this, that or “a” prison she’s looking for, it’s “The Prison” as institution and idea, American style. Her idea about that idea is clever, damning, and convincing: that to best understand the culture of incarceration in 2016 isn’t to film inside but rather outside of correctional facilities, where America’s prison industrial complex affects innumerable and fundamentally vital aspects of life—from laws and economies to the ways we treat and understand one another.” -Eric Hynes, Film Comment

Brett Story is a writer and independent non-fiction filmmaker based out of Toronto and New York. Her first feature-length documentary, the award-winning Land of Destiny (2010), screened internationally and was broadcast on both Canadian and American television. Her journalism and film criticism have appeared in such outlets as CBC Radio, The Nation Magazine, and Antipode. She was the recipient of the Documentary Organization of Canada Institute’s 2014 New Visions Award and was a nominee for the 2015 Ontario Premier’s Awards for Excellence in the Arts. Brett holds a PhD in geography from the University of Toronto and is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the City University of New York Graduate Center. The Prison in Twelve Landscapes, Brett’s second feature-length documentary, is currently screening at festivals internationally. 

Gallery 400‘s current exhibition, our duty to fight will be on view preceding the screening. Organized by Black Lives Matter Chicago, our duty to fight offers a living testament to the specific and shared struggles that have been at the core of radical, visionary world-making in Chicago organizing. The exhibition invites visitors to join the struggle against state repression and terror while working to build collective power.

Run of Life is a collectively curated experimental documentary and expanded media series held at the Nightingale Cinema and/or other venues roughly once a month. The series pairs a recent feature experimental documentary with a short nonfiction work in any number of mediums – performance, video short, interactive presentation, audio doc, etc. At each event, a post screening Q&A will be moderated by either a local expert engaged in the movie’s subject matter or an artist involved in the making of the work. RUN OF LIFE seeks to join experimental and documentary media audiences while exploring emerging tactics within representations of reality; the empathetic connection that is built through sensory experience rather than factual arguments; and aesthetic shifts in documentary that come with the breakdown of the fourth wall.  RUN OF LIFE is programmed by Jillian Hansen-Lewis, Yana Kunichoff, Christy LeMaster  & Beckie Stocchetti.



Filed under: archival, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, social justice, surveillance, Uncategorized, video