1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

Ism, Ism, Ism: Umbrales

Experimental Women Filmmakers from Latin America

Wednesday, November 13th, 7 PM, FREE

Ism, Ism, Ism
Umbrales: Experimental Women Filmmakers from Latin America
(Various Artists, 1955-2003, Various Countries, digital and 16mm, 79 min total)

This program showcases female filmmakers who sought to carve out a place within the male-dominated world of Latin American independent audiovisual production. Key works, such as Argentine filmmaker Narcisa Hirsch’s Come Out (1971), exemplify the defiant position toward gendered and essentializing aesthetics expected of Latin American women filmmakers. This program includes pioneering Uruguayan filmmaker Lydia García Millán’s Color (1955), one of the first abstract experimental films from Latin America; the politically charged Super 8 experiments by Puerto Rican underground artist Poli Marichal; and a recent video essay by Mexican artist Ximena Cuevas.

Come Out
(Narcisa Hirsch, Argentina, 1971, 11 min.)

Color
(Lydia Garcia, Uruguay, 1955, 4 min.)

Desnudo con alcatraces
(Silvia Gruner, Mexico, 1986, 2 min.)

Popsicles
(Gloria Camiruaga, Chile/US, 1982-1984, 5 min.)

Umbrales
(Marie Louise Alemann, Argentina, 1967, 19 min.)

Paracas
(Cecilia Vicuña, Chile/US, 1983, 19 min.)

Devil in the Flesh
(Ximena Cuevas, Mexico, 2003, 5 min.)

Copacabana
(Vivian Ostrovsky, Brazil, 1983, 10 min.)

Blues Tropical
(Poli Marichal, Puerto Rico, 1982, 4 min.)

About the Ism, Ism, Ism Series:
Ism, Ism, Ism: Experimental Cinema in Latin America (Ismo, Ismo, Ismo: Cine experimental en América Latina) was organized by Los Angeles Filmforum as part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Ism, Ism, Ism surveys Latin America’s vibrant experimental production from the 1930s through today. www.ismismism.org

Ism, Ism, Ism is accompanied by a bilingual publication, Ism, Ism, Ism / Ismo, Ismo, Ismo: Experimental Cinema in Latin America (Jesse Lerner and Luciano Piazza, editors, University of California Press, 2017) placing Latino and Latin American experimental cinema within a broader dialogue that explores different periods, cultural contexts, image-making models, and considerations of these filmmakers within international cinema. Available worldwide, https://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520296084.

Lead support for Ism, Ism, Ism is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation. Significant additional support comes from the Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

This program is produced in partnership with The Block Museum, Filmfront, and Comfort Station.



Filed under: experimental, feminism, film, Free Screening!, social justice, video

Filipa César

four short works

Friday, November 15th, 7PM, $7-$10 suggested donation (cash only)

(Filipa César, 2010-2018, Various Countries, digital, 66 min total)

Artist in attendance!

The Nightingale is proud to welcome Filipa César to Chicago to screen four short genre-bending documentary works, in addition to the screening of her feature-length project Spell Reel (2017) at Conversations at the Edge. These short films and videos shot from 2010-2018 survey César’s current practice, as artistically innovative as it is politically significant.

Porto 1975
(2010, 11 min, Portugal)

Applying the same economy used in César’s other films — one shot which uses the duration of an entire 16mm film reel — Porto 1975 is a tracking shot that unfolds at the social housing complex, Cooperativa das Águas Férreas da Bouça, designed by Álvaro Siza Vieira, as an integral part of the Ambulatory Service of Social Support (SAAL, 1972–76).

Cacheu
(2012, 10 min, Germany / Guinea-Bissau)

Cacheu is a 10-minute shot of a lecture, performed by Joana Barrios, revolving around four colonial statues, which are stored today at the Fortress of Cacheu, one of the first bastions constructed by the Portuguese in 1588 in order to facilitate slave trade in the West African country of Guinea Bissau.

Conakry
(2013, 11 min, Germany / Guinea-Bissau)

Staged at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Conakry is a sequence shot on 16mm film that travels through time, space and media to revisit one film reel from the Guinean archive. This particular reel documents an exhibition curated by Amílcar Cabral at the Palais du Peuple in 1972 in Conakry, Guinea, reporting on the state of the war against Portuguese rule.

Sunstone
(with Louis Henderson, 2018, 35 min, France / Portugal)

Sunstone tracks Fresnel lenses from their site of production to their exhibition in a museum of lighthouses and navigational devices. It also examines the diverse social contexts in which optics are implicated, contrasting the system of triangular trade that followed the first European arrivals in the ‘New World’ with the political potential seen in Op art in post-revolutionary Cuba.

 

About the artist:

Filipa César is an artist and filmmaker interested in the fictional aspects of the documentary, the porous borders between cinema and its reception, and the politics and poetics inherent to the moving image and imaging technologies. Since 2011, she has been researching the origins of the cinema of the African Liberation Movement in Guinea Bissau as a laboratory of resistance to ruling epistemologies. The resulting body of work comprises 16mm films, digital archives, videos, seminars, screenings, publications, ongoing collaborations with artists, theorists, and activists, and is the basis for her Phd thesis at FCSH-New University of Lisbon.

César premiered her first feature-length essay film Spell Reel at the Forum section of the 67th Berlinale, 2017. Selected exhibitions and screenings have taken place at the 29th São Paulo Biennial (2010); Manifesta 8, Cartagena (2010); Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin (2011-15); Jeu de Paume, Paris (2012); Khiasma, Paris (2011-2015); Kunstwerke, Berlin (2013); SAAVY Contemporary, Berlin (2014-15); Tensta Konsthall, Spånga (2015); Mumok, Vienna (2016); Contour 8 Biennial, Mechelen, Gasworks, London, MoMA, New York (2017); The Harvard Art Museums, Boston (2018); HKW, Berlin (2019).

This program is produced in partnership with Conversations at the Edge and the Video Data Bank at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.



Filed under: archival, artist in attendance, documentary, documentation, essay, experimental, film, history, social justice

Book Launch & Salon

Saturday, November 9th, 7 PM
$5-10 sliding scale (no one turned away)

Please join us as we celebrate the release of

Xandria Phillips’ debut poetry collection, HULL &

Raych Jackson’s debut collection EVEN THE SAINTS AUDITION.


Rachel “Raych” Jackson is a writer, educator, and performer. While teaching third and fourth grade in Chicago Public Schools, Jackson competed in numerous national poetry teams and individual competitions. Her poems have gained over 2 million views on YouTube. She is the 2017 NUPIC Champion and a 2017 Pink Door fellow. Jackson recently voiced ‘DJ Raych’ in the Jackbox game, Mad Verse City. Her latest play, “Emotions & Bots”, premiered at the Woerdz Festival in Lucerne, Switzerland. Jackson wrote a room dedicated to her city for 29Rooms’first installment in Chicago, through Refinery 29. She co-created and co-hosts Big Kid Slam, a monthly poetry show in Chicago. Jackson’s work has been published by many— including Poetry Magazine, The Rumpus, The Shallow Ends, and Washington Square Review. Her debut collection EVEN THE SAINTS AUDITION released September 24th through Button Poetry. She currently lives in Chicago.

Even the Saints Audition: A book of poems exploring the relationship between blackness, shame, and what it is to live a life tied to the church. Rich with historical context and a deeply engaging personal narrative.


Xandria Phillips is a poet and visual artist from rural Ohio. They are the author of Reasons For Smoking, which won the 2016 Seattle Review chapbook contest judged by Claudia Rankine. Their poem “For a Burial Free of Sharks” won the 2016 Gigantic Sequins poetry contest judged by Lucas De Lima. Xandria has received fellowships from Cave Canem, Callaloo, and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, where they are the First Wave Poetry Fellow. Their poetry has been featured in Black Warrior Review, Crazyhorse, Poets.Org, Virginia Quarterly Review, and elsewhere.

HULL explores emotional impacts of colonialism and racism on the Black queer body and the present-day emotional impacts of enslavement in urban, rural, and international settings. HULL is lyrical, layered, history-ridden, experimental, textured, adorned, ecstatic, and emotionally investigative.



Filed under: artist in attendance, autobiography, black and brown, collaboration, essay, experimental, lecture, performance, poetry, queer, reading, social justice

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