1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

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The Work of Emily Eddy &
the Nightingale’s 9th Birthday!!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 1, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us as we celebrate the ninth affordable renewal of our lease with a new series presenting the work of the folks behind the Nightingale. Over the course of the next year, we will treat each programmer to a mini-retrospective as a vehicle to ask you, our community, what this place has been and should become as it nears a decade in existence.

First up is heir apparent, Emily K. Eddy.  She has been curating film, video, and new media works as Co-Director of the  Nightingale since 2013. She is also a film, video, and digital media artist in her own right. This program spans the last four years and includes outside works that heavily inform Emily’s thematic and aesthetic interests.

Emily graduated from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013, where she received her Bachelors in Fine Arts. Combining many different forms of moving image, her work utilizes strategies of video diaries, archival practices, and experimental documentaries. Emily has shown work and programmed screenings at many venues in Chicago, as well as her hometown, Portland, OR, Reykjavik, Iceland, and various mid-western cities. Her most recent curated program, HOW TO FIGHT LIKE A GIRL will be presented at Echo Park Film Center in Los Angeles on March 24.

As always at Nightingale birthdays there will be cake, questionable punch, and dancing.

 

Program Details

Amsterdam Camera Vacation – Steve Reinke
Digital Video, 12:00
2001

No Chick Is An Island – Emily Eddy
Digital Video, 6:59
2013

I (can?) not be defeated – Emily Eddy
Digital Video, Super 8mm, 9:02
2013

I Touched Her Legs – Eva Marie Rødbro
Digital Video, 15:13
2010

this must be the place – Emily Eddy
Digital Video, 6:09
2014

Vesturbæjar – Emily Eddy
Digital Video, 8:08
2017

 

 

 



Filed under: 8mm, BIRTHDAY PARTY, experimental, feminism, geography, iceland, icelandic, international, landscape, new media, performance, queer, rural, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

MOVEMENT MATERIAL

Camera/Dance Works by Jeremy Moss & Pamela Vail
Artists in Attendance!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, December 7th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Jeremy Moss and Pamela Vail to present a 60-minute program of video, 16mm projection, and live performance that highlights transfigurative gestures via the collision of camera and dance. This program explores the roles and functions of both the cinematographer (Jeremy Moss) and the dancer (Pamela Vail) while engaging questions of space, movement, and the ways in which the frame and the cut create alternate walls and rhythms. The progression of this camera/dance collaboration has led the artists to pointedly examine equality, balance, interactivity, and reciprocity between both forms.

Jeremy Moss and Pamela Vail have been actively collaborating since the fall of 2008 and their collective films and videos have shown at prominent national and international festivals including Experiments in Cinema, Crossroads in San Francisco, Cucalorus, Next Dance Cinema, Cinedans in Amsterdam, Arkipel in Jakarta, and at renowned North American venues such as the Northwest Film Forum, San Francisco Cinematheque, Vox Populi in Philadelphia, and Echo Park Film Center.

Their non-narrative visual explorations investigate and present the singular moving body via structural camera and rhythmic editing. Both durational and intense, phrasing of movement and cutting range from assaulting and severe to meditative and lulling. Through this program, the artists ask: how do/can camera and movement inform the other, and offer new possibilities without favoring one over the other? Can the camera act as a dynamic partner, more than simply a new “stage” or documenting device for the dancer? Can the dancer be more than a subject embedded within the frame and altered by the cut? What is the role of location when considering the duet between dancer and camera? How can the dance film continue the early investigations of camera and movement radically propelled by Maya Deren in the twentieth century.

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Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, collaboration, dance, experimental, hand-processing, landscape, music, performance, place, rural, sound, Uncategorized, video