1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

The HARD EARTH

Filmmaker Sally Lawton in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 8th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us for this special premiere screening of The Hard Earth, a feature documentary by Sally Lawton, preceded by The 51st Star, a short 16mm film by Ian Curry.

THE HARD EARTH is an experimental documentary charting the relationship of five Ukrainians and one Ukrainian American to the 2014 revolution and preceding war.

The film is shot over the central and western regions of Ukraine, immediately post-revolution. Six figures explain their relationship to previous and furthering events in their homes and towns. First the Euromaidan protests are discussed as a singular, illuminating event. After abstracted information, stories of the annexation of Crimea, war in the East, and the disillusionment of the USSR, reveal complex portraits.The director examines interpersonal relationships and how the making of the film impacts realizations. The guides and narrations take on specific forms, showing the miniature in global news stories. The elusive categorization of Ukraine, free and yet oppressed is framed by the difficulty and ease of documentation.

SALLY LAWTON is making film and video work in Chicago and grew up in Detroit. She owns Sincerely Productions which makes commercials for local businesses. She has done curatorial work with experimental film and documentary in Chicago. Her academic background is in film and nonprofit studies, graduating from DePaul University in 2013. Her interest in this project began after her friend, Maya Demianczuk, returned from the Euromaidan. Sally began filming interviews primarily for a public archiving project Maya began, which lead to traveling to Ukraine in summer 2015 and collecting material for the film.

IAN CURRY’s moving image work takes inspiration from the many genres within the 16mm format such as: silent, educational, experimental, avant garde, ethnographic, and documentary films. He combines formal strategies gleaned from celluloid’s history through experimentation to produce stunning imagery that embraces the feeling of a memory or reflection. His films use contact printing, multiple exposures, and in-camera editing or feature on the fly remixing with multiple projectors driving the audience down expanded cinema alley. Characterized by unique moments or observations, rushing energies of light, and striking rhythmic edits; concepts of film and performance are married into a raw celluloid trip with 16mm prints, projectors, and double system soundscapes.

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, geography, international, narrative, place, social justice, travel, video

A ROLL FOR PETER

A Tribute Screening for Peter Hutton
Contributors, Michael Wawzenek and           Paul Marcus, in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, March 25th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale is pleased to present A ROLL FOR PETER, a multi-maker, 16mm, black & white tribute to filmmaker Peter Hutton (1944-2016).

Participating filmmakers, Michael Wawzenek and Paul Marcus, in attendance!

Many filmmakers and artists were deeply affected by Peter’s death in June 2016. Twenty-plus former students, colleagues, and admirers of Peter Hutton answered an invitation to shoot A ROLL FOR PETER. The parameters were simple: shoot a single 100 foot roll of 16mm black and white reversal film. The rolls are strung together with black leader separating the rolls, as Peter often separated the single shots in his films. Organized and assembled by Jennifer Reeves and Mark Street, and set on tour thanks to the energies of Eric Theise, this series of pieces speaks to Peter’s strong contemplative aesthetic ethos. Each filmmaker has 2 minutes and 47 seconds of screen time to commune with Peter’s memory, and the collected rolls become more than the sum of their parts.

The organizers write, “Peter Hutton’s contemplative, visually arresting landscape and urban films invite us to take our time within silent cinematic tableaux of place, so that we may discover the beauty of overlooked moments. His carefully composed long-duration shots, whether of city, nature, sea or factory, remind us of the wonder we can discover in the familiar. As we observe with patience, humility and vulnerability, Peter’s work offers us a sanctuary from the frantic, goal oriented state of current visual culture.”

“To me one of the most attractive things about cinema is the fact that you can evoke a sense of mystery, of wonder or curiosity in an environment, a landscape, a room, anyplace, by suspending time. So much of the information that we perceive in film is explained or presented to us in such a way that we can’t help but rationalize it. Once someone leaves us to our own interpretive devices, we can feel a great reprieve and the opportunity to actually give something to the work. It’s like sitting and looking at a painting, at first it might not grab you, but the longer you look at it, the more things reveal themselves.” (Peter Hutton in A Critical Cinema 3, interview with Scott MacDonald)

Program Details:

A Roll for Peter (2016)
16mm and 16mm x 2, black & white, silent, 60 minutes

Participating Filmmakers:
Dominic Angerame, Roddy Bogawa, Cassandra Bull, Jacob Burckhardt, Jesse Cain, David Gatten, Richard Max Gavrich, George Griffin, Eve Heller, Mott Hupfel, Nikolas Jaeger, Amanda Katz & Josh Lewis, Theodore Rex King, Robbie Land, rebecca (marks) leopold, Paul Marcus, Daryl Meador, Mary Beth Reed, Jennifer Reeves, Dave Rodriguez, Peter Rose, Lynne Sachs, Josephine Shokrian, Fern Silva & students, Jordan Stone, Mark Street, G. Anthony Svatek & Zachary Nichols, Eric Theise, Audrey Turner, Michael Wawzenek, Max Weinman & Jake Carl Magee, Timoleon Wilkins

*Catalogues from the Thomas Cole Historic Site screening and tribute on October 9, 2016, which honored and recognized Peter Hutton as a Hudson River Filmmaker, will be available at The Nightingale on Saturday, March 25.

Further information about the film:
http://erictheise.com/films/a-roll-for-peter/

 


Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, dual projection, experimental, film, geography, hand-processing, international, landscape, place, travel, Uncategorized

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