1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

THE BEAM

small matters and cosmic scans from Nina Barnett + Jeremy Bolen, Deborah Stratman, Mike Gibisser and Semiconductor

Wednesday, September 19 at 8 PM, $7-10

The Beam plays like a science nonfiction road film–– following the largely invisible NOVA experiment path over 550 miles – from Illinois to Northern Minnesota – in search of something that’s everywhere: neutrinos, the tiny subatomic particles that fill our world, unbothered by matter or its related matters. Visually striking, enlightening but never didactic, first time collaborators Barnett and Bolen—draw out the poetics of seeking the unseeable, of trying to name and know the invisible bits that we share space with. In celebration of its world premiere, we’ve paired it with some other incredible films playing in the interstices of the scientific and poetic, dispensing with those classifications, but keen to understand the links between technologies of vision and visualization, the metaphors through which we understand the universe.

 

Nina Barnett + Jeremy Bolen — The Beam | 27 mins. | HD | color | sound | 2018

“They go through everything and they never stop.”

“There is no stop.”

“It just keeps going into the cosmos”

 

Mike Gibisser — Second Law: S Leh St. | 14 mins. | 16mm to HD | color | sound | 2010

The second of a four part series. The second law of thermodynamics, the law of entropy, states order tends toward disorder. An old woman passes time in her home. The dust in the air sometimes floats skyward.

 

Semiconductor — 20Hz | 5 mins. | HD | b+w | sound | 2011

20Hz observes a geo-magnetic storm occurring in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Working with data collected from the CARISMA radio array and interpreted as audio, we hear tweeting and rumbles caused by incoming solar wind, captured at the frequency of 20 Hertz. Generated directly by the sound, tangible and sculptural forms emerge suggestive of scientific visualisations. As different frequencies interact both visually and aurally, complex patterns emerge to create interference phenomena that probe the limits of our perception.

 

Deborah Stratman — …These Blazeing Starrs! | 14 mins. | 16mm to HD | b+w | sound | 2011

Since comets have been recorded, they’ve augured disaster: catastrophe, messiahs, upheaval and end times. A short film about these meteoric ice-cored fireballs and their historic ties to divination that combines imagery of 15th-18th century European broadsides with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory footage.

…These Blazeing Starrs! juxtaposes a modern empirical desire to probe and measure against older methods, when star gazers were translators, explicating the sky more intuitively for predictions of human folly. Comets are now understood as time capsules harboring elemental information about the formation of our solar system. Today we smash rockets into them to read spectral signatures. In a sense, they remain oracles – it’s just the manner of divining which has changed.

programmed by Jesse Malmed



Filed under: artist in attendance, collaboration, documentary, environmental, essay, experimental, place, science, sound, video

THIS STRUCTURE EXISTS…

This Structure Exists in Real Life:
Digital Video Work by Orr Menirom
Artist in Attendance!

Monday, November 20 at 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale is delighted to present Orr Menirom and a solo screening of her digital video art. Surveying work from the past eight years, this screening follows Menriom’s development from a sculpture background into a concrete exploration of the materiality of the video medium. Broadly, Menirom’s work investigates how contemporary digital technologies complicate indexical representation of reality and human perception. In making work that plays on the edges of the technical and conceptual properties of digital video, Menirom engages narrative expectation and the murkiness of memory by using glitch, off-set editing, and conspicuous digital construction.

“My current video practice focuses on the ephemeral as a tool for the investigation of the social and political condition. Can the act of imagination, underlying the work of art, become a tool for social and political change? My short films move between figuration and abstraction, investigating what is real and what is barely or beyond perceptible. Some of the videos begin as a familiar form, such as a news interview, a political debate or a viral YouTube video. As the work progresses, the form slowly disintegrates into an abstract space, inhabited by glitched images and anonymous voices. Another area of interest in my work is the complex relations between video art and film. I re-edit materials from film, television and social media in order to investigate the mechanisms by which they construct meaning. Influenced by the video essay genre, I question the narrating voice often used in video essays and cinema in general, and try to find texts within the footage itself. I re-edit speeches, dub images and use others’ words to create new sentences. The editing is transparent, and the editor’s hand is felt through jump-cuts and glitches. This brings to the surface the power dynamic between the viewer and the author: Whose voice speaks in the video? Whose message is heard?”- OM

Orr Menirom was born in Tel Aviv and received an BFA from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem in 2010 and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2014. Her work has been presented internationally at festivals and galleries including International Film Festival Rotterdam, Fafa Gallery in Helsinki, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, the Chicago Underground Film Festival and Aspect/Ratio Gallery in Chicago.

Program Details:
The Vanishing Monuments (2009, 5:42)

Index (Untitled Symmetry) (2017, 0:39)

Sunset and a Tower (2010, 4:50)

Index (Untitled Gatekeeper) (2017, 1:11)

Limited Speech Holds Endless Misunderstandings (2013, 10:00)

Index (Untitled Exit) (2017, 0:37)

Exchange (2014, 12:03)

Index (Untitled Modern Savage) (2017, 2:10)

Clinton and Sanders Looking at the World and Naming Things for the First Time (2017, 11:23)

Index (Untitled Baudrillard) (2017, 1:12)

Homewrecker (2016, 14:32)

TRT 64:31

Programmed by Christy LeMaster

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, found footage, international, place, re-photography, surveillance, Uncategorized, video

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