RECYCLED CINEMA

Work by  Roger Beebe
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series
Roger Beebe in person!

beebe

Monday, April 20,  7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

Filmmaker/curator/professor Roger Beebe returns to Chicago with a contemporary expanded cinema program titled RECYCLED CINEMA that will immerse the audience in imagery and sound. Best known for his live cinema performances, Beebe will host an evening of carefully crafted and meticulously timed multi-projector experiments that pull from his practice of appropriating educational, industrial and mass-cultural imagery. Decidely analogue, Bebee intentionally places the projectors and the projectionist (himself) in the room with the audience. His performances often incorporate archival material to build loose themes and visual synchronicity into accumulative, experimental documentaries pieces.

Program Details:
Strip Mall Trilogy (2001, 9:10, super8mm)
“The Strip Mall Trilogy” is a series of three city symphonies that attempt to liberate color, sound, and form from the sprawling consumerist landscape of postmodern America. Part 1, “Green Means Go,” presents fragments of color over a musique concrete soundtrack composed of sounds recorded at the strip mall. Part 2, “The Abecedaire,” wrestles (and later plays) with alphabetic form extracted and abstracted from the signs of commerce of which they are normally a part. Part 3, “X-formations,” tries to argue that there is, in fact, beauty after strip malls. Let’s hope so. Parts 1 and 3 were edited entirely in camera.

Famous Irish Americans (2003, 8:00, digital video)
Who’s your famous Irish American? Georgia O’Keefe? William McKinley? Sandra Day O’Connor? How about Shaquille O’Neal? This videotape is a secret history of some of our most overlooked Irish-American citizens; a hyperflat exploration of race, America, and the limits of binary thought.

Money Changes Everything (2009-2011, 5:00, 3x16mm)
Three days in Las Vegas, Nevada; three different visions of the discarded past and of the constantly renewed future. A three-part portrait of a town in transformation: a suburban utopia in the desert, a cancerous sprawl of unplanned development, a destination for suicides.

S A V E (2006, 5:15, 16mm)
A disused gas station offers a curious imperative to passersby: “SAVE.” A riddle posed in the form of architecture: what is there to save? One more installment in the history of Americans pointing their cameras at gas stations; an attempt to figure out something about where we’ve been, where we’re headed, and what’s been left behind. The first part of “S A V E” was edited entirely in camera.

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Filed under: 16mm, archival, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, performance, Super 8mm

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