OUT OF SITE CHICAGO

Neighborhood Performance Art
Documentation Screening

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Wednesday, December 3rd at 7:00 pm, $7-10

For the third year in a row, The Nightingale is delighted to host  an end of year screening for our neighborhood’s beloved outdoor performance series. Out of Site Chicago curates cutting edge unexpected encounters in public space. OoS support contemporary performance artists to create new work that engages directly with the public. Artists are invited to select sites that resonate with their practice. The mission of OoS is to bring cultural experiences to everyone facilitating unique surprises for people as they come home from work, curating work that brings joy and transports people out of their daily routines to create a moment of reflection and wonder in their lives.

This screening will include nine short videos of each public performance from 2014.

Including work by:
Emilio Rojas (Featured International Artist from Canada)

Elena and Erin

Jake Vogds

Free Air: Regin Igloria and Amy Sinclair

(more…)



Filed under: documentation, performance, surveillance, video

Visual AIDS: Alternate Endings

 A Commemorative Program

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Monday, December 1st  at 7:00pm, $5

In commemoration of the 25th anniversary of Day With(out) Art on World AIDS Day (December 1, 2014), The Nightingale is pleased to showcase Visual AIDS’ program of newly commissioned short videos by Rhys Ernst, Glen Fogel, Lyle Ashton Harris, Hi Tiger/Derek Jackson, Tom Kalin, My Barbarian, and Julie Tolentino.

ALTERNATE ENDINGS utilizes the medium of video to highlight diverse voices that bring together charged moments, memories and personal perspectives amidst the public history of AIDS. These seven short videos intersect at a crossroads in which the artists position themselves during the present moment of HIV/AIDS cultural production: looking back at the historic past as they envision divergent narratives and possibilities for the future, because AIDS IS NOT OVER.” (Visual AIDS)Select information on the commissioned videos:

 

Tom Kalin, Ashes, 2014
For the 25th Anniversary of Day Without Art, Tom Kalin photographed thousands of high resolution still images and “stitched” them into a moving image. While borrowing library books for research on another project, Kalin discovered, glued to the endpapers, ordinary “due date” ledgers stamped with dates spanning three decades. Inspired by these tiny ledgers—like skin or palimpsests that recorded an analogue history, an accumulation of many gestures—Kalin combines quotidian pictures snatched from his daily life with an evocative musical track by ongoing collaborator Doveman (Thomas Bartlett). The film layers dates and moments from Kalin’s personal world with the public and global history of AIDS.

My Barbarian, Counterpublicity, Hd video, 2014, Shot in LA at My Barbarian Studios
My Barbarian’s Counterpublicity is a staged video performance based on an essay about Pedro Zamora, AIDS activist and star of the Real World: San Francisco, written by José Esteban Muñoz in his book, Disidentifications. The three members of My Barbarian re-perform scenes from The Real World in an alienated style, resisting the affect of “reality tv” even as they interrogate its politics, contrasting these scenes with the embodied performance of 90s-inspired music videos, with lyrics adapted from Muñoz’s theory of Queer counterpublic spheres that operate against the dominance of racism and homophobia.

Hi Tiger, The Village, 2014, Digital video, Directed by Derek Jackson, Shot by Rollin Leonard
Hi Tiger, the Portland, Maine based art-punk band fronted by visual artist and performer Derek Jackson, recreates the song “The Village” by New Order. Originally, New Order recorded the song as an upbeat new wave tune in 1982. With Hi Tiger’s re-imagining some 30 years later, The Village becomes a torch song that meditates on themes of love and loss, complicity and defiance. In the context of HIV and AIDS, the song becomes a love letter to those that have passed and a call to arms for the ones who remain.

Julie Tolentino, evidence, 2014 (Special thanks to Abigail Severance & Juvenal Cisneros)
In evidence, Julie Tolentino’s naked, moving body articulates backward on her hands and knees, balancing a cluster of Asian medicine cups. Her self-made sound piece initiates the video with a queer list of loved ones living and lost, recognizable or not, as both invocation and provocation of individuals who deeply shifted her perspective. As the listed names blur and are archived in Tolentino’s body, evidence opens up to the list’s potency through a female, brown, artist/activist body in the unseen yet held spaces of relationship, memory, sex and loss.

More info at www.visualaids.org

 

 

 



Filed under: archival, documentary, experimental, performance, queer, Uncategorized, video

FRIENDSGIVING 2014

A Seasonal Potluck and Shooting Party

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Sunday, November 23rd at 2:00 pm

It’s that time of year again! Please join us at the Nightingale for our annual holiday potluck. We will eat, drink, and shoot this year’s Nightingale trailer, which truth in advertising, is really more a moving image document of all the folks we feel grateful to know and watch movies with. This year the trailer will be led by Nightingale programmer and artist, Jillian Hansen-Lewis. As usual, there will be a large turkey, vats of mashed potatoes, vegan main dish, and homebrew cider. Please bring a side dish or dessert to share. All foods types encouraged. Friends of friends and children welcome.

See last year’s movie, made by Ian Curry and Jesse Malmed, here.

2:00 – Food
3:00 – Dessert, Drinks, and Conversation
4:00 – Shoot
5:00 – Dancing, Napping, More Eating?



Filed under: film, FRIENDSGIVING, performance, potluck, Uncategorized, video

ANTHROMENTARIES, THREE

Recent works and words
by Steve Wetzel (in attendance!)

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Saturday, October 18th at 7:00 pm, $7-10 

The Nightingale is ecstatic to bring Steve Wetzel, his words and works back to Chicago. Like the people and places that populate tonight’s program, Wetzel work is unassuming, quotidian and idiosyncratic—uniquely itself and comfortable in its oddness. Taking the world and the millions of ways a life can be lived as sources, Wetzel’s crafts portraits of minor league hockey players, tick racers, inventors and laid-off fishermen, to name a few. There’s a Midwesternness, polite but peculiar, that permeates this work. In addition to his anthromentaries for the screen, Wetzel will present a few short readings.

Kid Beat Box: Twenty-two Tapes, Edit Nine, 2012, 9 minutes, video

In the end all biography is inadequate, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try. There’s much to learn from these efforts. In saying this I don’t mean to suggest that Kid Beat Box is a biography; I don’t think it is, or if it is a biography, then that’s just part of the story, part of the experience: experiment in biography, anthromentary, experimental document, flimsy structuralist video, short documentary essay. Whatever the case it’s only nine minutes long, and we can handle that. (SW)

 

The First Shot is Silent, 2010, 15 minutes, video

The First Shot is Silent is about the commemoration of a once-thriving fishing village, now bulldozed into an industrial corridor. As with all progress, many experience its opposite: reversal into disappearance. The memorial merges the material and the spiritual by both preserving the idea and memory of something now vanished—really a sort of apology—and a physical marker that conjures the realness of geography and the actual bodies that once animated it. (SW) 

Of the Iron Range, 2014, 19 minutes, video

Of the Iron Range documents a cultural event in a small Midwestern town (Cuyuna, Minnesota) that once held the nation’s supply of iron ore. Every year, people from across the region gather for a dynamic, convivial social performance where hundreds of wood ticks are gathered and raced. Deeply symbolic and rich in human observation, Of the Iron Range offers a portrait of one of America’s once-thriving industrial sites. (SW)

 

Steve Wetzel is an artist from Minnesota, USA, and currently teaches in the Film Department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Over the past decade Wetzel has produced many works of experimental non-fiction and anthromentary video, and has shown nationally and internationally. Much of Wetzel’s work focuses on social construction and the everyday inscription of the human symbolic. These themes can also be found in a book he penned in 2010, Occasional Performances and Wayward Writings, that was described by his editor as “an urgent and generous exegesis . . . [a] re-collecting of thoughts and experience, a naming of bullshit.” The second volume is forthcoming.

Presented by Jesse Malmed

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, performance, reading, video

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