1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

Alex MacKenzie’s APPARITIONS

Dual 16 mm Projector Performance

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, April 27, 8:00 pm, $7-10 suggestion

Apparitions  |  55 minutes (2 X 16mm colour + b&w, 2016)

Where one locates ruptures or denies them is a political choice that determines the construction of the present. Whether one excludes or foregrounds certain events and processes at the expense of others affects the intelligibility of the contemporary functioning of power in which we ourselves are enmeshed.
-Jonathan Crary, Techniques of the Observer

Beauty is a manifestation of secret natural laws, which otherwise would have been hidden from us forever.
-Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Inspired by early stereo imaging and the clash and collusion of socioeconomic forces, this suite of works seeks to dismantle cinematic codes while foregrounding projector and light as sculpture: a conscious corruption and interference of the apparatus to evoke the unexpected, reshaping representation into the realm of material and space. Using colour gels, masking, lens interference and projector movement in tandem with an exploration of binocular disparity, perspective, patterning and the film surface itself, APPARITIONS explores the transitional space between image and abstraction, nature and culture.

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Alex MacKenzie is a Vancouver-based media artist working primarily with 16mm analog film equipment and hand processed imagery. He creates works of expanded cinema, light projection installation, and projector performance. His work has screened at the Rotterdam International Film Festival, the EXiS Experimental Film Festival in Seoul, Lightcone in Paris, Kino Arsenal in Berlin and many other festivals and art spaces worldwide. Alex was the founder and curator of the Edison Electric Gallery of Moving Images, the Blinding Light!! Cinema and the Vancouver Underground Film Festival. He was an artist in residence at Atelier MTK in Grenobles France, the Struts Gallery/Faucet Media in New Brunswick, Cineworks’ Analog Film Annex in Vancouver and Daimon in Gatineau. Alex co-edited Damp: Contemporary Vancouver Media Art (Anvil Press 2008), and interviewed David Rimmer for Loop, Print, Fade + Flicker: David Rimmer’s Moving Images (Anvil Press 2009). Commissions include Portal, (Situated Cinema WNDX Winnipeg 2012), Auroratone: Digitalis (FilmPop Montreal 2012), The Film That Buys The Cinema (Cube Bristol 2013) and Hyborian Witch (Wrong Wave/Kensington Gore 2013). Alex is a founding member of the Iris Film Collective in Vancouver.

 



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, experimental, film, performance

First Year SAIC MFA Students

The Nightingale will host a screening of first year SAIC MFA students’ film, video, and new media work.

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, May 6th, 7 pm, $7-10

Ranging from experimental documentary to 3D and 2D experimental animation, these films and videos represent the culmination of a year spent in thought and labor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. These works, produced as first year students in the MFA program, explore themes of loss and displacement, the role of the accordion in Chinese culture, and chance operations. Join us for a screening of works completed and in progress, including a live kazoo soundtrack.

Including:

Ricardo Salcedo Martínez – Home(s)
Julia Pello – In the Time//In the House\\ of Slow Sex
Emily Sasmore – ___
Benji Sayed – ihavefailedyouall
Kelsey Velez – Pinwheel
Peng Zuqiang – Accordion Class

Ricardo Salcedo Martínez was born in Cuenca, Ecuador in 1989. He got his undergraduate degree Film at the School of Arts and Social Sciences in Chile. Through fiction, documentary and essay film forms his work often delves into questions of identity, belonging and perception. He is currently studying for his Master’s at SAIC.

Julia Pello is a Russian-born poet and filmmaker who has shown work around the world including at The Getty, Le Centre Pompidou, and the Bangkok International Film Festival among many others. She has collaborated on various audio-visual projects including Hour of Star and Zerkalo and presented live projections at such venues as Cité de La Musique. Julia is currently a Master of Fine Arts candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Emily Sasmore’s work focuses on power relationships. Telling narratives focusing on interpersonal relationships allows her to talk about domination on both a small and large scale. Using both tangible and intangible materials, she brings up the roles that reality and the imaginary play within them. The stories and spaces she creates are meant to leave questions. None of which are answered. By reveling in these interactions, the viewer is asked to enter into limbos, engaging with unending, repetitious power struggles.

Desi-Corean artist Benji is interested in glitch, noise, and game environments to explore concepts of identity loss, alienation, anxiety, and failure.

Kelsey Velez is an MFA candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has screened at Indie Grits in Columbia, SC, New Orleans, LA & in Athens, Greece. She is interested in marrying traditions of representation and abstraction to depict and distort ideas of recreation, diversion and sport.

Peng Zuqiang is a filmmaker and translator born in Changsha, China in 1992. His film and video works speculate and question the potential and condition of collectivism through exploring historical objects and environments. Recent exhibitions include: “De arrogantie van De jeugd” (2015) at Galerie Gabriel Rolt, Amsterdam. “Casual Contradictions” (2014) at MOCA Shijiazhuang, and “The Temporary: 01” (2014), at ARTicle Gallery, Birmingham. His has participated in screenings at Acadia Missa and Chinese Visual Festival, both in London where he completed his BA at Goldsmiths College. He is currently a candidate of MFA in Film at the School of Art Institute in Chicago.

Programmed by Emily Eddy and Kelsey Velez



Filed under: 16mm, animation, documentary, experimental, feminism, film, music, narrative, new media, opening, painting, performance, video

THE PAST IN RELIEF

Recent Work by Ana Vaz
Ana Vaz in Person!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, May 8, 6 pm, $7-10

The work of Ana Vaz confronts our conceptualization of history via themes of colonialism, semiotics, and memory. Vaz creates loose sound and color palettes, imagines impossible pasts, and melds together popular and personal texts all in service of refocusing our understanding of the ages before our own.  She reframes well-known historical realities with elements of utopian fantasy and poetic logic as a window to the contemporary moment and its inheritance of complicated forces.


Program Details:
A FILM, RECLAIMED (Ana Vaz & Tristan Bera, 2015, 20’, HD, sound)

The ecologic crisis is a political, economic and social crisis. It is also cinematographic, as cinema coincides historically and in a critical and descriptive way with the development of the Anthropocene. “A Film, Reclaimed” is a conversation, a pamphlet that reads the terrestrial crisis under the influence and with the help of the beautiful and terrible films which have accompanied it. – AV + TB

 

A IDADE DA PEDRA (2013, 29’, 16mm/HD, sound)

“As artificial as the world must have been when it was created”

A voyage into the far west of Brazil leads us to a monumental structure – petrified at the centre of the savannah. Inspired by the epic construction of the city of Brasília, the film uses this history to imagine it otherwise. “I look at Brasília the way I look at Rome : Brasília began with a final simplification of ruins”. Through the geological traces that lead us to this fictive monument, the film unearths a history of exploration, prophecy and myth. -AV

 

I PREFER NOT TO BE BUT TO TUPI (2015, 20’, performance, video, sound)

Brazilian modernist poet Oswald de Andrade cannibalizes Hamlet in his Anthropophagic Manifesto, a gesture of perspectival shift: Tupi or not not Tupi that is the question. The Amerindian Tupinambá, the Tupi, become the symbolic nexus that roots this shift. Therein, we must remember “we are all indians, expect for the ones who are not”. I Prefer Not to Be but to Tupi is a camouflaged incantation of another film, a literary expansion on and for the cinematic, an opening into a horizon of sonic and textual presences, spectres in/tangled in time and places.  – AV

 

Ana Vaz (b. 1986, Brasília) is an artist and filmmaker whose films and expanded works speculate upon the relationships between self and other, myth and history through a cosmology of signs, references and perspectives. Assemblages of found and shot materials, her films combine ethnography and speculation in exploring the frictions and fictions imprinted upon natural and built environments and its multiple inhabitants. A graduate from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and Le Fresnoy Studio National, Ana was also a member of SPEAP (School of Political Arts), a project conceived and directed by Bruno Latour. Recent screenings include the New York Film Festival – Projections, TIFF Wavelenghts, CPH:DOX, Videobrasil and Lux Salon. In 2015, she was the recipient of the Kazuko Trust Award presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center in recognition of artistic excellence and innovation in her moving-image work.Programmed by Christy LeMaster



Filed under: documentary, experimental, international, narrative, performance, Uncategorized, video

EVERYTHING SHE WANTS

Recent Work by Claire Arctander
& The Nightingale’s 8th Birthday Party

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, April 1, 8 pm, $7-10


Join us as we celebrate the Nightingale’s 8th year in existence with the video work of one of Chicago’s best party-makers, Claire Arctander. Along with the screening, our birthday will also include an introduction  to the new class of Nightingale programmers, cake, free beers, Nightingale-themed raffle gifts, and a dance party with our friends and loved ones. 

Working across multiple mediums, Arctander joyfully articulates conflicted feminist notions of desire and desirability. Via an investment in and respectful treatment of abject materials and low-brow media outlets- like pop music, home decor, porn, internet phenomena, edibles and consumer ephemera- she posits debasement as a viable position from which to critically operate.  In this screening, we are delighted to premiere  a new work by Arctander entitled Why Have There Been No Great Women Magicians?

One strain of Arctander’s moving image work can be housed squarely in performative video. Completing endurance tasks with exuberance and in colorful environments Arctander supplants performance art’s often dark tone with her own blithe and lavish presence. Using a sustained eye contact with the camera, she creates a dynamic awareness of looking and being looked at. Her femme beauty and generous gaze often suffuse the frame, creating an affective illusion of the work happening in the present moment.  The usual relationship to watching women onscreen is at once indulged and changed – the audience’s innate desire to be seen  answered with confidence and playfulness. -CA & CL

 

Program Details
Please Please Don’t (2012, digital file, 8:25)

Feeding Time (2014, digital file, 2:30)

The Right to Piss in Different Colors, Part 2: Tributes
(2014, digital file, 9:20)

Bloom Where You Are Planted (2013,digital file, 1:43)

Everything She Wants (2011, digital file, 9:31)

Three Scenes from Last Summer (2014, digital file, 3:43)
by Claire Arctander, Rami George & Latham Zearfoss

Why Have There Been No Great Women Magicians?
(2016, digital file, 10:00)

 

Claire Arctander earned a BA in Art Theory and Practice and Gender Studies from Northwestern University and an MFA in Studio Art from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She currently works in the Education Department at the Museum of Contrmporary Art Chicago. She has taught art classes for UIC and the City Colleges of Chicago. In the past she has been a resident at The Cooper Union, Summer Forum, ACRE and Ox-Bow Upcoming Shows include a one-person show at The Nightingale in Chicago, a group show at Weinberg Newton Gallery in Chicago and a group screening at the Mini in Cincinnati. Her practice also encompasses a social-political impulse to bring together and celebrate feminist makers. Arctander often curates and hosts events that showcase others’ work, most often through Crimson Glow, a feminist dance party and performance showcase project created with her often-collaborator Latham Zearfoss.

Programmed by Christy LeMaster



Filed under: BIRTHDAY PARTY, experimental, feminism, performance, queer, Uncategorized, video

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