A GEOGRAPHER’S LENS

Multimedia Methods and
Scholar-Activist Praxis
Presented by the Subconference of the
Annual Meeting of the AAG

rareearth

Wednesday, April 22, 6 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

Join us for an evening of discussion and excerpts from four films with four documentarian-geographers. In coordination with the Subconference of the Association of American Geographers’ annual meeting, this event will provide an opportunity for an off-site, trans- and non-disciplinary, multi-method mingling of idea makers and media makers. While exploring different content in different geographic settings, the four panelists’ pieces take up the overlapping themes of economic, state, and extra-judicial violence amidst the quest for endless accumulation and surplus. The works explore the the prison and military industrial complexes, contested spaces of ‘urban renewal,’ and sites of accumulation and abandonment ranging from the body to the Mojave Desert to the city of Detroit and beyond.  We will gather to discuss process-oriented questions about filmmaking and public scholarship for liberatory social change. The event will comprise a panel discussion with the four filmmakers (Elizabeth Knafo, Amanda Matles, Alexis Mitchell, and Brett Story) moderated by Annie Spencer, as well as excerpts from their latest films.  We will reserve ample time for audience discussion.

Rare Earth (2014) // Elizabeth Knafo
From the Mojave desert, to the Pacific seabed, to the surface of the moon, the rush for rare earth minerals is afoot. “Rare Earth”explores the re-opening of an historically toxic rare earth mine in the California desert, and the intensifying land rush for the high-tech minerals across the world. The work is a portrait of changing desert landscapes and the residents who grapple with the impacts of industrial mining. “Rare Earth” traces the toxic and transformative legacy of treasure hunting in the American West—a legacy of speculation, produced scarcity and the social violence of resource extraction—deepening in our era of global climate change.

Rerooting the Motor City: Notes on a City in Transformation (2013) // Paper Tiger
This is Detroit as seen by Paper Tiger Television members, Maria Byck, Amanda Matles, Nadia Mohamed, Adrienne Silverman. From food deserts, to the plans to “rightsize” the city, Detroiters resist, rework, and remain resilient given the social and ecological failures of post-industrial global capitalism. With a critical lens on race and class dynamics, this documentary weaves together segments on Detroit’s labor history, the roots of Detroit’s urban agriculture movement, a critical look at philanthro-capitalism and its relationship to urban renewal, as well as media (mis)representations of a city in transformation.

STEALTH (2014) // Chase Joynt and Alexis Mitchell
By merging hidden camera footage from a patient’s hysterectomy, with interviews of the objects used in these procedures and spaces, STEALTH poignantly and humorously mobilizes ‘sousveillance’ to subvert the perspective of surveilling machinery. Through a triangulation of corporeal, medical and military technologies, STEALTH provocatively points to previously unexplored histories and relationships between inanimate objects and human bodies.

The Prison in Twelve Landscapes (in progress) // Brett Story
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is a non-fiction work about the prison from the places we least expect to find it: the front yards, public spaces, and social rituals of everyday life. A meditation on the prison and its geographic disappearance in the era of mass incarceration, the doc unfolds as a cinematic journey through a series of landscapes across the United States where prisons do work and affect lives: an anti-sex offender pocket park in Los Angeles, a congregation of ex-incarcerated chess players shut out of the formal labor market, the overnight buses that carry visitors to far away prisons, an Appalachian coal town betting its future on the promise of prison jobs, and a host of other unexpected spaces.

The event is happening in collaboration with the Subconference of the Annual Meeting of the AAG. The Subconference was created to offer a space for radical academics and activists to think critically and creatively about the connections between academic geography, higher education, and social/political change. The subconference is an evolving ambition. Each year we seek out new ways to creatively appropriate the critical mass of the AAG, using the space of the conference as an asset for forging solidarities and facilitating collective exchanges between people who are already engaged in radical, socially transformative work in all the disparate locations that we come from.

Annie Spencer, curator of A GEOGRAPHER’S LENS,  is a writer, organizer, media maker, and doctoral candidate in economic geography at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Spencer’s work examines state improvement schemes, accumulation, addiction, and everyday wageless life in the post-American century.



Filed under: archival, documentary, experimental, found footage, lecture, narrative, new media, surveillance, Uncategorized, video

E.S.P TV

Live Taping at The Nightingale

esptv

Saturday, April 25, 7 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

E.S.P. TV is a live TV studio that hybridizes technologies old and new to realize synthetic environments for performance while also exposing the process of production.

The COAST TO COAST  tour will travel to 12 locations across the US in April 2015. For this project, a large ENG news van has been outfitted as a modified mobile broadcast unit. The van houses analog and digital broadcast consoles with additional internet and web ready capabilities.

The tour encompasses live taping events, exhibitions, screenings, and artists talks. Fifty plus artists  participating in this televisual project will create new works with a focus on transmission and simulation. In an effort to better document the broader spectrum of cultural activity, E.S.P TV teams up with  museums, galleries, project spaces, and DIY venues.  In addition to live performances, E.S.P TV will present a traveling video program at each location.  The events will be both recorded and streamed live, and made available on our website and on our television program.

The Chicago taping will include

Performances by
ONO
Nick Ciontea
Matchess
Mothergirl
Video works by
Thomas Dexter & Heather Dewey-Hagborg
Fern Silva
peter burr
Sabrina Ratté
Jeremy Rotsztain
Jeremy Couillard

 

Directed by Scott Kiernan and Victoria Keddie, this expansive project utilizes a mobile television studio to explore the artist dialogue with broadcast transmission, analog and digital media, and televisual liveness. Each live taping event is the realization of an artists’ collaboration with Kiernan and Keddie.  These events are taped live with a crew of cameramen, sound engineer, and video mixing team in front of an audience. The recorded events air on Manhattan Neighborhood Network public television weekly, as well as online, and have been exhibited internationally.

E.S.P. TV has held over 50 live taping events internationally and has aired over 70 episodes to date and has worked with various venues including: The Whitney Museum of American Art, New Museum, Museum of Arts and Design, Printed Matter, Millennium Film Workshop, New School, Rawson Projects, Recess (NYC); Interstate Projects, Spectacle Theater, Issue Project Room, Roulette (Brooklyn); Franklin Street Works (Stamford, CT), Liminal Space (Oakland, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Ballroom Marfa (Marfa, TX), General Public (Berlin),  STORE (Dresden), Studio XX (Montreal), Kling and Bang Gallery (Reykjavik) and Pallas Projects (Dublin).

E.S.P. TV broadcasts every Tuesday night at 10PM on Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN). Channel 67 in Manhattan, as well as online at www.mnn.org.  All episodes are then posted online on our website and Vimeo platforms.  E.S.P. TV now also airs on Wednesdays with Comcast Cable 66/966 or Verizon Fios 29/30 in Philadelphia at 11:30PM.



Filed under: animation, experimental, narrative, video

FOLLOW FOCUS

Daviel Shy and THE LADIES ALMANACK
Spring Screening / The Nightingale Turns 7!

followfocus

Saturday, April 4, 7 pm, $15
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

The Nightingale is delighted to introduce FOLLOW FOCUS- a new process-oriented screening series that rallies audiences and resources behind a moving image maker as they complete a feature project. Designed to expand viewership into the production stage, FOLLOW FOCUS invites audiences to observe a director’s process, collaborations, and inspiration. Our inaugural featured project is THE LADIES ALMANACK written and directed by Chicago-based filmmaker, Daviel Shy and produced by NYC-based performer, Stephanie Acosta.

THE LADIES ALMANACK is a feature-­length experimental narrative film shot on Super 8 and based on the novel of the same title by Djuna Barnes. The film is a kaleidoscopic tribute to women’s writing through the friendships, jealousies, flirtations and publishing woes of authors and artists in 1920’s Paris.

The Nightingale will host 4 screenings during the course of the next year, each one in a different season and  highlighting a different element of the process ending with a rough cut screening in Fall of 2015. The production of a commissioned art object will also raise funds for the film.  Admission price  at each of the four screenings includes part of a limited edition, risograph-printed Ladies Almanack Tarot Deck designed and illustrated by Jess LeMaster. Attend all four screenings for a complete 24-card set.

The Spring Screening will include moving image work by cast and crew members of  the movie, including work by Stephanie Acosta, Alexia Morinaux, Fannie Sosa & Poussy Draama, Jessica Wienstein, Weléla Kindred, Caitlin Baucom, and Slaveya Minkova, among others.

Party to celebrate The Nightingale’s 7th birthday to follow the screening. We will premiere the 2015 Nightingale trailer made by Jillian Hansen-Lewis.

 

(more…)



Filed under: artist in attendance, BIRTHDAY PARTY, documentary, experimental, feminism, film, found footage, international, music, narrative, performance, queer, Super 8mm, Uncategorized, video

THE OTOLITH GROUP

The Radiant & People To Be Resembling
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series

the-radiant-2012-film-still-by-the-otolith-group-courtesy-and-copyright-the-artists

Monday, March 23, 7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

THE RADIANT and PEOPLE TO BE RESEMBLING
by The Otolith Group
Screened in association with LUX

Preceded by BABBIT RESERVE MINING BLAST by Jack Behrend
Courtesy of Chicago Film Archives
With minimalist synth improvisation by Nick Broste, Kent Lambert, and Seth Vanek

Program Details
THE RADIANT(2012, HD video, 64 min)
Commissioned as part of dOCUMENTA (13) in 2012, The Radiant explores the aftermath of March 11, 2011, when the Tohoku earthquake triggered a tsunami that killed many thousands and caused the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. A film essay burdened by the difficult task of representing the invisible aftermath of nuclear fallout, The Radiant travels through time and space to invoke the historical promises of nuclear energy and the threats of radiation that converge in Japan’s illuminated cities and evacuated villages in the months immediately following the disasters. The Otolith Group’s cinematic document offers glimpses into the shape and presence of an unseen entity and its abstract manifestation through visual phenomena.

PEOPLE TO BE RESEMBLING (2102, HD video, 22min)
People To Be Resembling can be described as a five sided portrait of the methodologies of the post-free jazz, pre-world music trio Codona, founded by multi-instrumentalists Collin Walcott, Don Cherry, and Nana Vasconcelos in 1978. Consisting of stills by renowned photographers Roberto Masotti and Isio Saba, newly filmed and archival footage and original music performed by musician Charles Hayward, People to be Resembling reimagines the poetics of permutation that informed the sonic geography of the first Codona album recorded with ECM in September 1978. People to be Resembling returns to 1978 in order to redream the recording process at Tonstudio Bauer as a meditation upon the relations between visual anthropology, anti-colonial choreography, nuclear annihilation and Weltmusik. In its arrangement of positive and negative with colour and black and white and still and moving imagery, The Otolith Group’s People to Be Resembling stages an experiment in mnemonic cohabitation inspired by the visionary music of Codona.

The Otolith Group was founded in 2002 and consists of Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun who live and work in London. During their longstanding collaboration The Group have drawn from a wide range of resources and materials. They explore the moving image, the archive, the sonic and the aural within the gallery context. The work is research based and in particular has focused on the essay film as a form that seeks to look at conditions, events and histories in their most expanded form.

 

Special thanks to LUX and Chicago Film Archives for Program Support

luxlogoBEST_GRAB                  anniversary-logo



Filed under: animation, archival, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, found footage, international, music, narrative, new media, performance, reading, surveillance, Uncategorized, video

The Day After Groundhog Day

The Day After Groundhog Day Might Still be Groundhog Day: a kid* friendly screening of works by former kids* who have current kids*

groundhog-600

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015, 7 pm, $7-10
Artists in attendance!
Benefit for S.A.C.K. (Supporting Artists with Children or Kids)

 

 

to: pconnors@wpbh-tv.com
cc: jesse.malmed@gmail.com, kjschlie@gmail.com
bcc: ▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓, ▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒, ░░░░░░░░░░, ▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓, ▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒, ░░░░░░░░░░, ▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓, ▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒, ░░░░░░░░░░

“Okay campers, rise and shine, and don’t forget your booties because it’s cold out there.”

Hello Ice Sculptors, Cloudwatchers, Piano Players, Ned the Heads, Prognosticator of Prognosticators and Weather Forecasters:

Groundhog day is approaching again. As much as it’s a day we anticipate, the movie has taught us if nothing else that we should be grateful for the day after. In response we’re programming a screening* of new works by artist parents for the Nightingale Cinema on the day after, February 3.

We are requesting your participation in making a video which is either:

  1. A remake of Groundhog Day, or a portion thereof
  2. A remake of another video that relates in some way to Groundhog Day

Working with parents or kids or a groundhog is encouraged, but not mandatory. A channel 9 microphone might be provided. Visit a bed & breakfast, eat in a diner, look up at the clouds brave a snowstorm without a coat, make a quick trip to Pennsylvania (or Woodstock, IL), stop by the bank, repeat the last thing you did, repeat another thing you did, get better with practice, break a pencil in half and see if it’s still broken the next day, learn a French poem, catch a kid, save someone’s life, get to know a stranger, cheat at Jeopardy. All of this and more could be yours.

Please let us know in one of the next few todays if you will participate and we’ll put your name on the talent roster.

Contact Kyle Schlie, Jesse Malmed or Danny Rubin with any questions.
*This screening is part of the exhibition “Division of Labor: Chicago Artist Parents” on view through February 14 at Glass Curtain Gallery.

groundhog-copies

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, experimental, found footage, narrative, performance, video

Next Page »