The First 5 Years and The Last 5 Years
as part of Platforms: 10 Years
of Chances Dances


Tuesday, September 8, 8 pm, Free
Saturday, October 17, 8 pm, Free
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

A bookended pair of lively screening events featuring works from the past, present, and future of CHANCES granted artists, organizers, and scenesters. This is your pre-party party, snacks and group travel to that night’s CHANCES DANCES included.

Including work by: Mark Aguhar, Cavenaw and Cavenis, Sky Cubacub, Ky Dickens, EMR (Math Bass & Dylan Mira), Hope Esser & Daviel Shy, Rami George, Jacquelyn Carmen Guerrero, Meg Leary, Marianna Milhorat, Madsen Minax, Dylan Mira, Fawzia Mirza, Aay Preston-Myint, Macon Reed, Oli Rodriguez, Amina Ross & NIC Kay, Jules Rosskam, Xina Xurner, Latham Owen Zearfoss

Program Design by Marian Runk
Curated by Christy LeMaster


Begun in 2005 as an inclusive, welcoming, and alternative queer dance party, Chances Dances is a collective of artists, activists, DJs, and educators who organize parties, build safer spaces, and support local art and activism through direct funding and other resources.

Since its founding, Chances has sought to bring together Chicago’s varied LGBTIQ communities
by organizing dance parties that welcome people of all gender expressions and racial identities. For the
last six years, Chances has channeled profits from its parties into a biannual microgrant for local artists. In 2008, Chances launched the Critical Fierceness Grant, which awards $500 to Chicago-based artists and collectives who identify themselves or their work as queer. In 2012, Chances expanded the Critical Fierceness Grant to include the Mark Aguhar Memorial Grant, which funds projects by queer feminine spectrum artists of color with $1,000 grants. Through this grassroots funding in addition to our robust performance programming, Chances has established itself as hub of queer artistic activity in Chicago for ten years running.

In Fall 2015, the Platforms retrospective will showcase the artworks, herstory, and community-building processes of the Chances community over the last 10 years at several sites across Chicago. Drawing from over one hundred Critical Fierceness grantees and finalists, past and present Chances organizers, and members of the Chances community, Platforms will elevate and expand the reach of a long-standing and multifaceted queer collective practice.

Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, feminism, film, found footage, music, narrative, new media, opening, performance, queer, Uncategorized, video


Tracers/Nightingale Media Series #004:
Cauleen Smith’s I AM FURIOUS BLACK


Sunday, September 13, 5 pm, Free
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

TRACERS is teaming up with The Nightingale for a monthly media series featuring readings, scholars, films, moving pictures, music, meditation, performance, and lively discussion around topics of contemporary feminism. Over the course of the year, this series presents a body of texts and media designed to promote broader feminist discourse beyond the institutional setting. Your new feminist library starts here. Unless otherwise noted, these events are family friendly and FREE.

Chicago-based artist, filmmaker, activist, CAULEEN SMITH will host Tracers Media Night 004. Cauleen will present a table reading of a new screenplay called I AM FURIOUS BLACK…. featuring performances and video work by Alexandria Eregbu and Rashayla Marie Brown.

Filed under: artist in attendance, experimental, feminism, Free Screening!, narrative, performance, Uncategorized


And Other Recent Work
by Kevin Jerome Everson
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series


Monday, July 20, 7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

Screening accompanied by a printing of A GIRL’S YOUNGTOWN by Jacqueline Marino from Belt Magazine
Moderated by Belt Magazine Editor, Martha Bayne.

Fe26 (7 min, 2014)
Fe 26 is a 16mm short film by Kevin Jerome Everson that follows two gentlemen around the East Side of Cleveland, Ohio and examines the tensions between illegal work –in this case, the stealing of manhole covers and copper piping–and the basic survival tactics that exist in areas of high unemployment.

The Island of St. Matthews (64 min, 2013)
The Island of Saint Matthews is a 16mm feature film about the loss of family history in the form of heirlooms and photographs. Years ago filmmaker Kevin Jerome Everson asked his aunt about old family photographs. Her reply—that “we lost them in the flood” was the catalyst for this film, a poem and paean to the citizens of Westport, a community just west of Columbus, Mississippi, the hometown of the filmmaker’s parents. Residents, young and old, are here seen and heard reminiscing about the 1973 flood of the Tombigbee River. The film combines these interviews and conversations, filmed in front of a church, at a beauty school, on porches and backyards, with sequences of a waterskier on the Tombigbee River; a worker at the lock and dam; a young couple meeting with an insurance agent about flood insurance. The sound of a church bell—an original bronze sculpture made by the filmmaker and similar to the bell used to warn residents of an impending natural disaster—intones throughout, interspersed with a spare, elegiac score.

“With a sense of place and historical research, my films combine scripted and documentary elements with rich elements of formalism. The subject matter is the gestures or tasks caused by certain conditions in the lives of working class African Americans and other people of African descent. The conditions are usually physical, social-economic circumstances or weather. Instead of standard realism I favor a strategy that abstracts everyday actions and statements into theatrical gestures, in which archival footage is reedited or re-staged, real people perform fictional scenarios based on their own lives and historical observations intermesh with contemporary narratives. The films suggest the relentlessness of everyday life—along with its beauty—but also present oblique metaphors for art-making.” -Kevin Jerome Everson

Kevin Jerome Everson was born and raised in Mansfield, Ohio. He has a MFA from Ohio University and a BFA from the University of Akron. He is currently a Professor of Art at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Everson was awarded the prestigious 2012 Alpert Award for Film/Video and was the subject in spring 2012 of a mid-career retrospective at Visions du Reel, Nyon Switzerland, a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2011 and a retrospective at Centre Pompidou in 2009. 2014 Solo Museum exhibitions included the Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, VA; Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis and SECCA, Winston-Salem, NC. 2015. His films will be featured in the How to Remain Human exhibition at MOCA Cleveland May-Sept. 2015.

Programmed by Sally Lawton

RUN OF LIFE is a co-curated experimental documentary and expanded media series held at Constellation every third Monday of the month. The series pairs a recent feature experimental documentary with a short nonfiction work in any number of mediums – performance, video short, interactive presentation, audio doc, etc. At each event, a post screening Q&A will be moderated by either a local expert engaged in the movie’s subject matter or an artist involved in the making of the work. RUN OF LIFE seeks to join experimental and documentary media audiences while exploring experimental tactics within representations of reality; the empathetic connection that is built through sensory experience rather than factual arguments; and aesthetic shifts in documentary that come with the breakdown of the fourth wall.  RUN OF LIFE is co-curated by  Christy LeMaster, Beckie Stochetti, Robin Amer, Jillian Hansen-Lewis, Sally Lawton & Jenny Miller

Belt Magazine publishes independent journalism about the Rust Belt. Online only, it launched in September 2013, and focuses on longform journalism, op-eds and first person essays of interest to the Rust Belt and beyond. Belt Publishing, founded in 2012, publishes anthologies by and for residents of often misrepresented cities. Both the digital and book publishing arms of Belt are committed to carefully edited, complex writing. We believe in quality over quantity, community over analytics, and the importance of the Rust Belt. We rely on individual members to sustain us.

Martha Bayne is a writer and editor based in Chicago, and the editor-in-chief of Belt Magazine. She also edits, with Zoe Zolbrod, the Sunday page of the literary website The Rumpus and her features and essays have appeared in the Chicago Reader, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, the Rumpus, Bookworm, and the Baffler. She is a company member with Chicago’s Theater Oobleck and the founder of the long-running community meal project and hunger-relief fundraiser Soup & Bread, based at the Hideout bar and music venue. Her narrative cookbook, Soup & Bread Cookbook: Building Community One Pot at a Time was published in 2011 by Agate Publishing.


Filed under: 16mm, documentary, experimental, narrative, Uncategorized, video


 Lo Fi-Lo Def-Lo Tech Moving Image Works
Curator  LJ Frezza in attendance!


Saturday, July 18, 7 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

The BASEMENT MEDIA FESTIVAL is an annual traveling screening event, showcasing contemporary low-fidelity moving image works. Founded in response to hi-res commercial media and corporate-sponsored film fests, Basement is a celebration of the mediated experience as an aesthetic experience. We’ll be presenting a mix’dprogram of celluloid and .movs this year, so def drag yrself over for a wide array of glitch’d fuzzy, faded, and scratch’d. B THERE & B SQUARE. CU SOON.



Yates – The Bags, Probably 1971 – 5 mins

Jarrett Hayman – Me, Dancing – 2 mins

John Wilson – How To Remain Single – 17 mins

Amelia Johannes – Family Crockery (Whiteness) – 2 mins

Eric Stewart – Wake – 8 mins

Paul Turano – Toward the Flame – 5 mins

Jared Hutchinson – The Infinity Scroll, pt. II – 3 mins

Hannah Piper Burns – Outer Darkness – 11 mins

Henning Frederik Malz – Rest in Me – 6 mins

Felipe Steinberg – Tudo Referente a Frio: Rua César Bierrenbach, 181, Campinas – 15 mins



Watch the trailer here. // More info on tour dates and the fest in general here. // BASEMENT is co-organized by LJ FREZZA and NICHOLAS TAMBURO

Filed under: archival, documentation, experimental, found footage, music, narrative, new media, Uncategorized, video

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