1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

THE TUBA THIEVES

Director, Alison O’Daniel, in attendance!

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, August 18, 8 PM, $ 7-10

The Nightingale is thrilled to present a screening of Los Angeles artist Alison O’Daniel’s The Tuba Thieves. O’Daniel’s long-term film project The Tuba Thieves, made in the wake of tuba robberies from Los Angeles schools, elliptically connects the story of a deaf drummer to the students, band directors, and school communities who must reconcile with missing sound following the thefts. The film is composed of portraits of music and silence in Los Angeles and beyond, and is interrupted by fictionalized re-enactments of two historic concerts: the 1952 premiere of John Cage’s 4’33” at the Maverick Concert Hall in Woodstock, NY and a 1979 punk concert hosted by Bruce Conner at The Deaf Club in San Francisco.

Reversing the typical process wherein a composer responds to filmic imagery, O’Daniel commissioned musical scores by three composers and worked ‘backwards”, accumulating a narrative through a process of deep listening. First-hand accounts and real life details from collaborations with students, musicians, composers, and actors are continuously altering the narrative, which is filmed in segments over time, eventually forming a feature length film. Featuring scores by Ethan Frederick Greene, Christine Sun Kim and Steve Roden.

Total running time: 52 minutes

Poster by Caroline Walp

ALISON O’DANIEL is a visual artist working across film, sculpture, performance and music, inviting audiences and collaborators to navigate, de-construct and re-imagine sound. Her current project The Tuba Thieves is composed of narrative film, performance and sculptures based on commissioned musical scores made in response to an epidemic of tuba thefts occurring in Los Angeles high schools.

She has presented solo exhibitions at Art In General, New York; Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles; Centre d’Art Contemporain Passerelle, Brest, France and performances at the Hammer Museum, Knockdown Center, and Art Los Angeles Contemporary. She received a BFA in Fibers and Material Studies from the Cleveland Institute of Art, a Post-graduate Diploma of Fine Art from Goldsmiths College, University of London, and a MFA in Studio Art from UC Irvine, CA.



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, music, narrative, Uncategorized, video

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

MOVEMENT MATERIAL

Camera/Dance Works by Jeremy Moss & Pamela Vail
Artists in Attendance!

chroma

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, December 7th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Jeremy Moss and Pamela Vail to present a 60-minute program of video, 16mm projection, and live performance that highlights transfigurative gestures via the collision of camera and dance. This program explores the roles and functions of both the cinematographer (Jeremy Moss) and the dancer (Pamela Vail) while engaging questions of space, movement, and the ways in which the frame and the cut create alternate walls and rhythms. The progression of this camera/dance collaboration has led the artists to pointedly examine equality, balance, interactivity, and reciprocity between both forms.

Jeremy Moss and Pamela Vail have been actively collaborating since the fall of 2008 and their collective films and videos have shown at prominent national and international festivals including Experiments in Cinema, Crossroads in San Francisco, Cucalorus, Next Dance Cinema, Cinedans in Amsterdam, Arkipel in Jakarta, and at renowned North American venues such as the Northwest Film Forum, San Francisco Cinematheque, Vox Populi in Philadelphia, and Echo Park Film Center.

Their non-narrative visual explorations investigate and present the singular moving body via structural camera and rhythmic editing. Both durational and intense, phrasing of movement and cutting range from assaulting and severe to meditative and lulling. Through this program, the artists ask: how do/can camera and movement inform the other, and offer new possibilities without favoring one over the other? Can the camera act as a dynamic partner, more than simply a new “stage” or documenting device for the dancer? Can the dancer be more than a subject embedded within the frame and altered by the cut? What is the role of location when considering the duet between dancer and camera? How can the dance film continue the early investigations of camera and movement radically propelled by Maya Deren in the twentieth century.

(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, collaboration, dance, experimental, hand-processing, landscape, music, performance, place, rural, sound, Uncategorized, video

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