1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

NEW WORKS FROM EPFC

New Works From the Echo Park Film Center
Filmmakers & EPFC Founders,
Paolo Davanzo and Lisa Marr, in attendance!

Tuesday, October 10 at 8 PM, $7-10

The Nightingale is delighted to host comrade in arms and Los Angeles’ favorite microcinema on a midwestern tour showcasing their large and creative cinema fam. In recognition of their countless hours as the Center’s educators, programmers, projectionists and facilitators, Echo Park Film Center Co-op members were commissioned to make new experimental lens-based works exploring their relationships to Los Angeles. Coming from all walks of life, Co-op members include both experienced and self-taught filmmakers, queer identifying filmmakers, artists of color, art school graduates, and EPFC youth film program alumni.

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Filed under: artist in attendance, collaboration, experimental, film, found footage, narrative, travel, Uncategorized

ASIDES & BESIDES

video artists remixing artists’ videos

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Tuesday, July 11th, 8:00 pm, $5 suggested donation

Ashley McClenon
Benjamin Pearson
Blair Bogin
Cameron Granger
Clint Enns
Emily Eddy
Hannah Piper Burns
Scott Fitzpatrick

This program draws into focus our own (often productive) sloppiness in the language surrounding artistic production that includes the work of others. In this case, these works are less interested in (though not opposed to) ideas like détournement, appropriation, reenactment, “found” footage, glitch, covers, samples, collage, etc. than to how we can apply the thinking behind the music industry’s idea of the remix into the contexts and histories of experimental film, video art and critical cinema. Think: the extended remix, the dub remix, the club remix, the dirty remix, the radio remix, the house remix, the porch remix, the czech remix, the lights on remix. Serious is fun, fun is serious. Seat dancing allowed. Fresh looks assumed.

Organized by Jesse Malmed



Filed under: artist in attendance, experimental, found footage, video

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

HAND AND MACHINE

Recent 16mm Films by Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Filmmakers in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 15th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Cinema was the first inescapably mechanical art. But in this post-mechanical age, the traditional apparatus of cinema has all to rapidly been deemed obsolete and primitive. Yet the handing over of industrial machinery to anti-industrial users represents one of the prime creative opportunities for re-appraising and re-interpreting the nature of ourselves as transformed by the age of machines.

Post mechanical age, the humanness of the machine can be made evident. Post mechanical age, machine craft is the new hand craft. The Nightingale welcomes Australian DIY cine experimentalists Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie to present this program of seven recent film works exploring the primitive apparatus of cinema and the relation between hand and machine.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1280285592006760/

Program Details:

Blue Line Chicago
2014, 10 minutes, 16mm
Architectural abstractions of the second city.

Ginza Strip
2014, 9 minutes, 16mm
The Ginza of fable and memory. This is the first film I have finished using the ‘chromaflex’ technique that we developed. This is a very much hands on color developing procedure that allows selected areas of the film to be colour positive, colour negative, or black and white.

LUX
2010, 6 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie
‘L’, ‘U’ and ‘X’ shapes in an inner urban industrial suburb captured on regular 8mm as the old ‘Lux’ stove factory undergoes conversion into more apartments than the brain can comfortably imagine. The rise and fall of industry, the rise and rise of apartments in a seething, pulsating transition.

Crossing
2016, 11 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Across the sea. Across the street. Cross processed super 8 footage of fraught neighbours Korea and Japan in grain focused enlargement.

Invention of the Wheel
2015, 14 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
On man and machine.   On the wheel upon which man turns and is turned.     On ‘homo mechanicus’ – ‘machine man’.

Pancoran
2017, 7 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Jakarta traffic moves with the harmonious chaos of complex self organising entities everywhere. Through contact printer matteing techniques this mass transport becomes denser and denser until only the fluid futility of motion/motionlessness remains.

Jakarta traffic stands as proof of the paradox of motion.

Last Train
2016, 12 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie and Richard Tuohy
Found in the (now lost) archive of Lab Laba Laba, footage from a trailer for the Indonesian film ‘Kereta Api Terakhir’ (The Last Train) melts into a soup of chemigrammed perforations.

A film made in seven cities, and none.

Etienne’s Hand
2011, 13 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy
A movement study of a restless hand. Made from one five second shot. Sound constructed from an old French folk tune played on a hand cranked music box.

Inside the Machine
2016, 12 minutes, 3 x 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Lines. Direct optical sound. An alarm from the past and the voice of the machine.

 

Richard Tuohy (b. 1969, Melbourne, Aus.) began making works on super 8 in the late nineteen eighties. After a brief hiatus from cinema (including formal study in philosophy for seven years) he returned to filmmaking in 2004. Since then he has created almost 40 films.   His films have screened at venues including the Melbourne IFF, EMAF (Osnabruck), Rotterdam IFF, New York FF, Ann Arbor and Media City and he has toured Europe, North America and Asia presenting solo programs of his work. His films are typically highly structured and and have strongly formalist concerns. He is the proprietor of the artist-run film lab nanolab – the only lab for small gauge film in Australia. His works are firmly in the ‘hand-made’ film tradition. An advocate for the possibilities of hand made cinema, Tuohy has devoted much time and effort in sharing his knowledge through workshops and classes both in his native Australia (notably through the Artist Film Workshop in Melbourne of which he is the founder and convener) and internationally. He was also a co-founder of the AIEFF experimental film festival in Melbourne.

As a young person Dianna Barrie found her way into filmmaking as a middle ground between the pursuit of abstract music and philosophy. Ever pushing the limits of the hand processing of super 8 led to the establishment of nanolab with Richard Tuohy, and into the intersection of hand making and industrial cinema technology. This exploration has spread beyond individual work to the establishment of Artist Film Workshop, where celluloid is embraced and advocated by a community of practitioners in Melbourne.

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, hand-processing, international, performance, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized, urban

NOTE TO SELF

The Psychosexual Films of Nazlı Dinçel — Filmmaker in attendance

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, February 25th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

An evening of visceral and provocative handmade films that explore bodies, acts of the solitary, text, language, visual information and personal exposure. Nazlı Dinçel’s work reflects on experiences of disruption. She records the body in context with arousal, immigration, dislocation and desire in juxtaposition with the medium’s material: texture, color and the passing of emulsion. Her use of text as image, language and sound attempts the failure of memory and her own displacement within a western society.

Program Details:

Reframe 
16mm, 4min, Color, Silent, 24fps, 2009

Leafless
16mm, 8min, Color, Silent, 24fps, 2011

Her Silent Seaming
16mm, 10min, Color, Super 16 Image-Sound, 24fps, 2014

Sharing Orgasm: Communicating Your Sexual Responses (Found Film)
16mm, 12 min, Color, optical sound, 24fps, 1977

Solitary Acts #4
16mm, 8min, Color, Optical Sound, 24fps, 2015
Exacto Knife, Typewriter

Solitary Acts #5
16mm, 5min, Color, Sound, 24fps, 2015
Exacto Knife, Fishing Line, Sewing Machine

Solitary Acts #6
16mm, 11min, Color, Optical Sound, 24fps, 2015
Exacto Knife, 1.5mm Letter Punches, Hammer, Leather Puncher

VOID (4.INABILITY)
16mm, 4min, Color, Silent, 18fps, 2016

 

Programmed by: Lee Ferdinand

 

Image courtesy of Nazli Dinçel



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, experimental, feminism, film, found footage, hand-processing, Uncategorized

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