1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

SHALA MILLER

Heat Situated/Necessary Accessories

Thursday, August 31 at 8 PM, $7-10

The Nightingale presents Heat Situated/Necessary Accessories: new video works and poetry by Shala Miller. Her work primarily consists of photography, text, video and drawing from time to time. Language and conversation serve as the thematic umbrella for Shala’s work. Whether it’s the language of a photograph and it’s poetic capabilities or the conversation between the soprano and alto.

Originally from Cleveland, OH, Shala is a recent graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and she is soon to be a New Yorker.

PROGRAM NOTES:

THE ECHO, Super 8 converted to video, video, digital collage 8:14
LET’S GET IN THE DARK, video, 2:50
LULLABY FOR THE FALLING/A SPELL, video, 2:59
SOMETHING TO DO WITH THE HEAD AT THE TAIL, video, 5:08

videos to be followed by a reading of new poems.



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentation, essay, experimental, feminism, film, performance, poetry, Super 8mm, video

JAMES FOTOPOULOS

A Retrospective
Artist in Attendance!

 

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday-Sunday, August 4-6th,  $7-10

This August the Nightingale Cinema is happy to present a three night retrospective of Chicago native James Fotopoulos. Featuring past and new video works. Some of these pieces have not been screened in Chicago in over 10 years.

August 4th at 7:30 pm
CHRISTABEL
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2001
USA, 74 min. 16mm/video

“Christabel is an abstract interpretation of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished Gothic poem about female possession. Adhering to the poem’s structure the film is presented in four parts – Two digital video half hour segments and then two short 16mm conclusions. The contemporary relevance of the poem’s symbols and themes is underlined using performance combined with heavy image and sound layering.” —JF

Dignity
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2012
USA, 82 min, video

Agents Mr. Rainbow and Mr. Lamb are sent to an alien planet fighting a civil war. Their mission to destroy a perpetual motion machine is interrupted by their capture. While their interrogations proceed the two men struggle to come to terms with their suffering and pending death.

Dignity uses the minimal structure of a sci-fi B-film, the high artifice of painted backdrops, prosthetic horror effects, psychedelic noise soundtrack and early digital techniques to flesh out the philosophical ideas ranging from the stoic writings Marcus Aurelius to the fantasy prison drawings of Giovanni Battista Piranesi.

August 5th at 5pm
FAMILIES
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2002
USA, 97 min, 16mm.

A hybrid film that intentionally clashes techniques and syntaxes, FAMILIES is a series docufictional vignettes in a rural industrial town as portrayed through Fotopoulous’ singular eye.

“Life in a rural industrial town: a teenage boy, his family, friends and failed attempt at love are investigated through stark black-and-white photography and static long takes. Filmed in a fusion of authentic and staged documentation, with robotic performances by actors and non-actors, the piece meditates on the mundane existence of human and animal life.” —JF

There
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2014
USA, 103 min, video

Lamb is a troubled veteran and his girlfriend, M, is tormented as well. When he’s not working as a security guard in an old warehouse with other unstable vets, Lamb haunts a nightclub frequented by wounded and traumatized ex-soldiers. There he meets a one-armed vet, Thrill, who starts a strange story about the effects of his post-traumatic stress, which unsettles Lamb.

While walking though a forest, Lamb discovers a humanoid carcass and hides it in his basement. At the club he meets an older woman and begins an affair. Soon otherworldly events start to occur and his girlfriend is attacked inside their apartment by mysterious beings.

In the middle of the night the older woman comes over traumatized. She believes she was brought to an underground compound in the forest inhabited by creatures similar to the one Lamb discovered. She insists these aliens are waiting for a signal to attack. Lamb and M build a truck bomb to destroy the compound before it’s too late.  As they drive it to the nuclear power plant the story Thrill told seems about to end.

August 6th at 5pm
The Nest
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2003
USA, 78 min, 16mm

“Filmed in saturated colors on out-of-date film stocks with an aggressive soundtrack, the story of The Nest is told – The marriage of two young professionals unravels after an unnamed accident physically and emotional traumatizes the wife. Government agents, shadowy investigators and transgender beings appear, trying to solve the nervous-breakdown-mystery of secret alien forces that chose the couple as their target. In-camera tricks, drawings, derelict optical printing, miniatures, puppets and prosthetic makeup effects convey the dual collapse of the protagonists’ lives and the film structure as one unified entity.” —JF

The Given
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2015
USA, 75 min, video

An actress living in New York performs an audition, then goes to meditation and winds up at a party of artists viewing a film.  At home, she and her girlfriend explore buried memories and later nightmares trigger sleepwalking.  Finally, the actress enacts a childlike performance inspired by a Frank Wedekind play.

Mr Fotopoulos will be in attendance for all the screenings.

James Fotopoulos is a filmmaker who began production on his first feature-length film, ZERO (1997), in 1995. In 1998, he founded Fantasma for the production of his second feature, Migrating Forms (1999), and would continue to create a number of critically acclaimed narrative feature films, such as Back Against the Wall (2000), Families (2002), The Nest (2003) and Dignity (2012).

There will be an 15 minute intermission between films.

Programmed by Raul Benitez.



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, dual projection, film

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

The HARD EARTH

Filmmaker Sally Lawton in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 8th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us for this special premiere screening of The Hard Earth, a feature documentary by Sally Lawton, preceded by The 51st Star, a short 16mm film by Ian Curry.

THE HARD EARTH is an experimental documentary charting the relationship of five Ukrainians and one Ukrainian American to the 2014 revolution and preceding war.

The film is shot over the central and western regions of Ukraine, immediately post-revolution. Six figures explain their relationship to previous and furthering events in their homes and towns. First the Euromaidan protests are discussed as a singular, illuminating event. After abstracted information, stories of the annexation of Crimea, war in the East, and the disillusionment of the USSR, reveal complex portraits.The director examines interpersonal relationships and how the making of the film impacts realizations. The guides and narrations take on specific forms, showing the miniature in global news stories. The elusive categorization of Ukraine, free and yet oppressed is framed by the difficulty and ease of documentation.

SALLY LAWTON is making film and video work in Chicago and grew up in Detroit. She owns Sincerely Productions which makes commercials for local businesses. She has done curatorial work with experimental film and documentary in Chicago. Her academic background is in film and nonprofit studies, graduating from DePaul University in 2013. Her interest in this project began after her friend, Maya Demianczuk, returned from the Euromaidan. Sally began filming interviews primarily for a public archiving project Maya began, which lead to traveling to Ukraine in summer 2015 and collecting material for the film.

IAN CURRY’s moving image work takes inspiration from the many genres within the 16mm format such as: silent, educational, experimental, avant garde, ethnographic, and documentary films. He combines formal strategies gleaned from celluloid’s history through experimentation to produce stunning imagery that embraces the feeling of a memory or reflection. His films use contact printing, multiple exposures, and in-camera editing or feature on the fly remixing with multiple projectors driving the audience down expanded cinema alley. Characterized by unique moments or observations, rushing energies of light, and striking rhythmic edits; concepts of film and performance are married into a raw celluloid trip with 16mm prints, projectors, and double system soundscapes.

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, geography, international, narrative, place, social justice, travel, video

UIC MFA 2017

Works for the Screen

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 29, 7:00 pm, Free

 

Coinciding with the 2017 MFA Thesis Exhibitions at Gallery 400, the graduating MFA students from the School of Art & Art History at University of Illinois at Chicago present a series of works for the screen at Nightingale Cinema.

Program Details:

 Caleb Foss, Dirty Data, 9 minutes
Dirty Data science fictionalizes everyday systems that place an individual in a hall of two-way mirrors, the other side of which lies an unknown spectator.  Drone video, biometrics, virtual reality, facial tracking, and a cardboard box collide in one apparatus built to dissect Caleb Foss’ head and soil the data inside.

Chris Hoag, Botany w/Canal Stamps & Artifact, 2017, 16mm, 2 mins.
Botany w/ canal stamps & artifact.

Lorenzo Gattorna, way of the gods, 2016, S8/35mm to HD, 10:05 mins.
“The mysterious stirs a reaction: an ah! This ah! is not an ah ha! or Eureka — that is, an exclamation of discovering an answer. The ah! response to mystery is more a dumbfounded recognition and appreciation of an inexplicable power or presence. For Shinto, though, the point is to accept the awesome as part of the world in which we live. To deny or try to eradicate the wondrous mystery is no less than to run away from home.”

—Shinto: The Way Home, Thomas Kasulis
Music: In a Silent Way, Miles Davis, 1969

Nellie Kluz, All The Witches, 2016, 4:05 mins.
Witches, cinematographers and other members of the crew pass a night together in the woods in Film City, Mumbai.

Zachary Hutchinson, FINAL DAYS, 2016, 3:48 mins.
“It’s basically the queer rapture.”

Chris Hoag, Heat Sink w/ Heat Sinks & Favor Spelled the British Way, 2017, 16mm, 2 mins.
Heat sink w/ heart sinks & favor spelled the British way.

Jose Luis Benavides, Lulu’s Journal, 2017, digital video, 4:32 mins.
In this video-poem the artist collects his own thoughts projected in the voice of his mother to tell parts of her story previously untold in their many recorded conversations throughout the documentary process. Through a collection of episodic journal entries and poetic investigations, the voice of the young artist Amanda Cervantes reenacts the queer, Latina youth of Lourdes or Lulu. Rather than embody her they reflect a psychic space and interiority; the private place of reflection and consciousness muted by the institution and the insidious powers of patriarchal Western culture.

Chris Hoag, Pork Operations w/ Spinning & Bauble from the Shelf by the Ficus, 2016, 16mm, 1 min.
Pork operations w/ spinning & bauble from the shelf by the Ficus.

Jose Luis Benavides, Postcard from Read, 2015, digital video, 3:08 mins.
Modeled after collectable postcards of American mental institutions and asylums, this video-poem juxtaposes the bucolic landscapes of Chicago-Read Mental Health Center with a narrated nightmare journaled by the artist’s mother, Lourdes Benavides, who spent her teenage years at the aforementioned facility. Her voice and dream reflect a psychosexual landscape and the effects of institutionalized homophobia on one woman of color. Through the broken fences and cattail reeds, this video postcard mimics a style of historic ephemera to questions the legacy of institutions and the lasting ties of queer bonding and inherited trauma.

Chris Hoag, Chase Liquid w/ Sections, esp. Section IV, 2016, 16mm, 2 mins.Chase liquid w/ sections, esp. section IV.

Jose Luis Benavides, 1972 Commission on Mental Health, 2016, digital video, 7mins.
Sourced from official transcripts of the February 15, 1972 Commission on Mental Health held at Chicago-Read Mental Health Center, the artist unearths and revives this historic text. In this all Latina-centered reenactment the artist recast this commission in a queer, brown, accented and feminist scene of resistance to highlight the lack of Latina and women’s voices on the committee and/or the witnesses stand. The reenactment simultaneously pays homage to the bravery and strength of Patricia Krochmal, a Chicago reporter who admitted herself undercover at Chicago-Read to expose conditions of abuse and neglect, spawning the hearing itself. Through these investigations into the archive the artist attempts to answer questions regarding his mother’s possible treatment and conditions at the very institution she was held only a few years later.

Zachary Hutchinson, trash kick, 2016, 15 seconds
“I kick a trash can away from my reflection in a polar fleece suit I just made and Comfort Plus heels.”

Nellie Kluz, Pairs, 2015, 5 mins.
Gesture and communication systems: work, spiritualists, and baseball.

Zachary Hutchinson, pig kick, 2016, 15 seconds
“I kick a pig away from my reflection in a polar fleece suit I just made and Comfort Plus heels.”

 Zachary Hutchinson, pig kick 2, 2016, 1 min.
“I kick a pig down five flights of stairs in a polar fleece suit I just made and Comfort Plus heels.”

Chris Hoag, 6 Drachms w/ Lens Pivoting & Dens, 2016, 16mm, 2 mins.
6 drachms w/ lens pivoting & dens.

 Zachary Hutchinson, My new outfits, 2017, 3:30 mins.
“I show my collection of polar fleece suits and my Comfort Plus heels.”

Chris Hoag, The Sherwin-Williams Harmony Collection w/ Kodak 7266 & Parakeet, 2016, 16mm, 3 mins.
The Sherwin Williams harmony collection w/ Kodak 7266 & parakeet.

 

Total Running Time: 64 minutes



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, experimental, film, video

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