John Greyson’s URINAL
Presented by White Light Cinema


The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 4th, 7 pm, $7-10

White Light Cinema is pleased to present Canadian filmmaker and artist John Greyson’s rarely seen 1988 classic of queer cinema, URINAL, which continues to be one of the most provocative and urgent works made during the AIDS crisis of the 1980s.

Program Details:
URINAL (1988, 100 min, Blu-Ray Projection)
Directed by John Greyson

“An assortment of deceased great gay artists from history are mysteriously brought back from the dead and summoned to a Toronto garden to be given a special assignment: to investigate the causes, history and implications of public urinal arrests in Ontario. Over the course of seven evenings, Sergei Eisenstein, Frida Kahlo, Yukio Mishima, Langston Hughes, Frances Loring and Frances Wyle are presented with data relating to a number of gay-issues, including the history of public washroom sex and its policing. Greyson’s first feature, URINAL challenges conventions, drawing on techniques from video, documentary, narrative and experimental film to create a thought-provoking examination of the history and status of gays and lesbians in contemporary society. Winner of the Teddy award at the 1989 Berlin Film Festival.” (Canadian Film Institute)

John Greyson is a Toronto film/video artist whose shorts, features and installations include: Fig Trees (2009, Best Documentary Teddy, Berlin FIlm Festival; Best Canadian Feature, Inside Out Festival); Proteus (2003, Best Film, Diversity Award, Barcelona Film Festival; Best Actor, Sithenghi Film Festival); The Law of Enclosures (2000, Best Actor Genie); Lilies (1996 – Best Film Genie, Best Film at festivals in Montreal, Johannesburg, Los Angeles, San Francisco); Un©ut (1997, Honourable Mention, Berlin Film Festival); Zero Patience (1993 – Best Canadian Film, Sudbury Film Festival); The Making of Monsters (1991 – Best Canadian Short, Toronto Film Festival, Best Short Film Teddy – Berlin Film Festival); and Urinal (1988 – Best Feature Teddy, Berlin Film Festival). He co-edited Queer Looks, a critical anthology on gay/lesbian film & video (Routledge, 1993), is the author of Urinal and Other Stories (Power Plant/Art Metropole, 1993), and has published essays and artists pieces in Alphabet City, Public, FUSE, and twelve critical anthologies. An associate professor in film production at York University, he was awarded the Toronto Arts Award for Film/Video, 2000, and the Bell Canada Video Art Award in 2007.” (Vtape)

Programmed by Patrick Friel


Filed under: 16mm, experimental, film, queer, Uncategorized


Recent 16mm Films by Margaret Rorison
Filmmaker in Attendance!


The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 18th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Margaret Rorison to present a program of short films shot on 16mm from 2012-2016. Many of these works have developed from travel and explorations through rural and urban landscapes and function as odes to memories of experience. Some films are explorations of the relationship between time and the frame, between pacing and cut and of memory … Sound is an important component to these works as well. Rorison has composed many of the soundtracks with the use of field recordings, contact mics and lucid narrations made by her grandfather. One of her most recent films, Memory of August is an ode and portrait study of her 95 year old grandmother, Margaret Bennett, the widow of Harry Bennett who has been another strong influence in Rorison’s earlier work. Prior to filmmaking, Rorison worked primarily with painting and poetry and is interested in exploring these methods of language and thought through the medium of 16mm film.

“Rorison’s works frequently wander through empty or seemingly empty spaces. Her soundtracks—often consisting largely of electronic music on the drone/noise spectrum—often create a sense of warm alienation, coloring the films’ empty landscapes. Rorison’s films abound with “negative space” compositions—shots which frame a “nothing” (for example an empty sky, a wall, water) against borders of dark (shadows, bridges, walls)… this seems to suggest something of a turning away from the world of the social and a turn towards a state of introspection. These films relish solitude and alone-ness, and even while this solitude is sometimes tinged with dread or alienation, even as the filmmaker’s visions tend toward the apocalyptic, this solitude is asserted often as a source of strength.” — Steve Polta, Artistic Director, San Francisco Cinematheque


Program Details:

Gowanus Haze
2012 | 16mm to video | 5 min | sound

The filmmaker returns to her old neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. The footage captures a landscape known as The Gowanus Canal, an area of Brooklyn, which was once inhabited by a productive port and industrial compound. The area is now overly polluted and is officially registered as a superfund site by the US environmental protection agency. The film’s soundtrack incorporates personal narrations as well as recordings of the filmmaker’s grandfather who recalls his own memories of New York City. Additional sounds include recordings of a lumberyard and wind in Northern Vermont, keyboard, recordings of the projector projecting the film itself.

2013 | 16mm to video | 9 min | sound

This film documents a unique choreographed performance that took place one late Summer afternoon in Patapsco State Park in Baltimore, Maryland. Choreographed by Clarissa Stowell Gregory and performed by The Effervescent Collective. Soundtrack composed by Josh Millrod.

The Waiting Sands
2013 | 16mm to video | 5 min | sound

My grandfather, Harry Bennett was a huge influence on me as a young artist and thinker. He was a painter and had made a living as an illustrator for gothic and romance novels in the 1960s. In the last month of his life, he was omitted to the hospital with terminal conditions. Unable to film him, I began to capture the harvest moon outside his bedroom window as a way to cope with the emotions I was experiencing. A few hours after the footage had been shot, my grandfather passed away. This footage serves as a document of his last breaths. Soundtrack composed by Josh Millrod.

Dark Logic
2015 | 16mm to video | 5 min | sound

An ode to the restricted space and surveillance in the skies. Sound derived from a live performance by Mario de Vega.

Shot in Los Angeles, Summer 2015

Funes el memorioso
2015 | 8mm to 16mm to video | 2 min | sound

The final footage of a painter, slowed down to lengthen the memory. Sound by Audrey Chen (voice and cello) & Flandrew Fleisenberg (percussion)

The Road to Kalmar
2015 | 16mm to video | 7 min | sound

This piece is an ode to Anna Karlson, who was born in Kalmar, Sweden and immigrated to North America in 1909 to start a new life. She was born to a family of poor farmers, many of whom died early on. Anna moved to the United States by herself when she was 19 years old. The footage was shot in Kalmar, Sweden by her great granddaughter, Margaret Rorison 94 years after Anna left her homeland. The footnotes of text are taken from recorded childhood memories of her grandchildren, Debbie and Pamela. Soundtrack by Josh Millrod.

The Birds of Chernobyl
2012 | 16mm | 7 min | sound

This piece was originally made as a performance with a live collage soundtrack. This is an ode to my grandfather, Harry Bennett and our shared interest in solitude and landscape.

2014 | 16mm | 3 min | sound

This short film is a study of the wind turbines along the shores of Amager, Copenhagen. Triple exposed on one roll of color film, then finding four generations of grain. The soundtrack is a recorded live improvisation by artist Mario de Vega using unstable media and acoustic resonators.

Memory of August
2016 | 16mm | 5 min | sound

A series of moments captured in room 139. Intimate spaces of time spent with my grandmother, Margaret during a month long recovery in a rehabilitation center in Baltimore, Maryland.

Lichtenberg Skies
2016 | 16mm | 3 min | silent

Studies of the Klingenberg Power Plant during a month long residency in Berlin. November 2015

2013 | 16mm | 3 min | sound

This film documents long walks throughout Berlin, Germany during the cold days of April, 2013. The film is edited in camera and composed of single frame snapshots along with longer moments of glance, captured on one 100’ roll of film. The title comes from a story by Robert Walser.

One Document for Hope
2015 | 16mm | 8 min | sound

The sterile and procedural narrative of the Baltimore City Police Scanner on Monday April 27 against precious moments of gathering, celebration and protest in Baltimore from April 28 – May 3, 2015.

Smoke, shadows, gliding further when alone
2016 | 16mm | work in progress | sound

An excerpt of a longer piece in progress.

Restoration of a memory: a short 16mm film that focuses on the landscape and architecture of Baltimore City.


MARGARET RORISON is an artist and curator originally from Baltimore, Maryland. She has been making short 16mm films since 2012. She is interested in the visceral nature of memory and the act of memorializing our relationships to space and experience. Sound and walking are important components to the rhythm of these film structures. Often her work comes from solitary walks through rural and urban landscapes, using in camera editing techniques and filed recordings to create form and find structure. Rorison, has been curating and running the experimental film series, Sight Unseen since 2012 and has been a member of the High Zero Foundation and Maryland Film Festival Screening committee both since 2011. Her work has been shown at Anthology Film Archives, Ann Arbor Film Festival, CROSSROADS, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Images Festival, Mono No Aware VI & VII, Sonic Circuits Festival, Microscope Gallery, The Moscow Museum of Modern Art and The High Zero Festival.

Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, archival, artist in attendance, autobiography, documentary, essay, experimental, film, found footage, geography, hand-processing, landscape, literature, music, performance, place, poetry, social justice, sound, surveillance, travel, Uncategorized, video


Recent Video Work Made by Powerful Femmes

TIDE_LizCambron 1

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, September 30th, 7:00 pm, $7-10


Filed under: anarchy, animation, artist in attendance, experimental, feminism, film, new media, performance, queer, Uncategorized, video


Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns, Aaron Zeghers
Filmmakers in Attendance!


The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, October 6th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes experimental / expanded filmmakers Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns and Aaron Zeghers, as they flee the ravaged streets of their fair Winnipeg, in search of a warmer, more exotic climate to present their work. “All Roads Leave Winnipeg” is 7-date film tour featuring expanded cinema performances and single channel films by three of Winnipeg’s most notorious cine-stars, Scott Fitzpatrick, Aaron Zeghers and Clint Enns.

the program//

-Part I – Work by Aaron Zeghers-

Holland, Man.
[2015, 20min, 16mm + Super 8 + Digital + Live Sound]

As two growing years pass, Don Zeghers – farmer from Holland, Manitoba – phases out his multi-generational family farm. With experimental photography on Super 8, 16mm and digital mediums, his son Aaron Zeghers follows this life change. The dissolution of the family farm is seen both intimately but also as a microcosm of the modern industrialized world. Nature is contrasted with industrial might in this sentimental and existential portrait of one’s own family. (This will not be performed in Milwaukee)

Everything Turns…
[2016, 12min, Super8]

From 1 to 12 minutes, ‘Everything Turns…’ is a shorthand study of the mythology of numbers. Scientific tradition is adopted then eschewed for rumours, legends and defunct theories from across the ages. As the days turn to night and the seasons pass, the camera pens a year-long record of space, movement and the passing of time in historic locations around the world. This almanac of anthropomorphic numerology is recorded in-camera onto Super 8 using a myriad of experimental techniques. Just like Richter nearly 100 years ago, we will discover that everything turns, everything revolves and everything feels the deep score of time.


Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, artist in attendance, documentary, dual projection, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, history, landscape, performance, science, sound, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized


Recent 16mm Films from Negativland Lab
Filmmakers in Attendance!

chorus_lewis      the-marshes_liu

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, September 29th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Josh Lewis and Simon Liu as they interweave a selection of their 16mm films made by hand at Negativland MPL, an artist-run film lab in New York City, overlapping in their affinity for experimental processing and printing techniques. With Lewis working predominantly in direct chemical manipulation of exposed film surfaces, and Liu utilizing a roaming impressionistic camera paired with multiple passes on a contact printer, the program establishes the centrality of the Film Lab both as an epistemic concept and as a practical mode of production. Each film emerges out of a continual and rapid cycle of exposing, processing, projecting, repeat. As such, the films here are rarely the culmination of a process, but rather worthy points extracted from ongoing lines of investigation.


Program Details:

2011 / 16mm / B&W / Optical Sound / 3:30 min. (Josh Lewis)

2015 / 16mm / Color / Silent / 17 min. (Josh Lewis)

The Marshes
2016 / 16mm / Color / Sound / 11 min. (Simon Liu)

Doubt 3 & 4
2013 / 16mm / Color / Optical Sound / 6 min. (Josh Lewis)

Shuffle Cove
2016 / 16mm / Color / Sound / 8 min. (Simon Liu)

The Past is Past [but there is something now that I regret like I was about to do it]
2015 / 16mm Dual Projection / B&W / Silent / 6 min. (Josh Lewis)

Harbour City
2015 / 16mm Dual Projection / Color + B&W / Sound / 14 min. (Simon Liu)

I Guess It’s Always Been That Way, I Don’t Know Whether That’s Important Or Not.
2016 [Work In Progress] / 16mm Triple Projection / Color / Silent / 10 min. (Simon Liu)

Doubt 8 & 9
2013 / 16mm / Color / Silent / 6 min. (Josh Lewis)

TRT: 90 min.


JOSH LEWIS is an artist and experimental filmmaker working at a fluid intersection between abstraction, documentary, and narrative forms. Coming from a background working in photochemical film processing labs, Lewis’s handmade films explore the boundaries of manual knowledge, bodily struggle, and the persisting enigma of material potential. Lewis has shown work at Anthology Film Archives, Microscope Gallery, Eyebeam, Uniondocs, The Filmmaker’s Co-op NY, and at festivals such as The International Film Festival Rotterdam, Chicago Underground Film Festival, New Orleans Film Festival, Antimatter, Onion City and EDOC: Encuentros del otro cine festival internacional de cine documental. He is a 2015 recipient of a NYFA Film/Video Fellowship. Josh works as a lab technician and is the founder of the artist-run film lab Negativland MPL. joshlewisfilm.com

SIMON LIU lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Born in Hong Kong and raised in both Hong Kong and Stoke-On-Trent, England, he moved to New York in 2006 and received a degree in Film Production from New York University. His work has been exhibited and distributed at festivals and institutions internationally including the International Film Festival Rotterdam, CROSSROADS, EXiS, Microscope Gallery, Mono No Aware IX, WNDX, FilMadrid, Paris Festival of Different & Experimental Cinemas, the British Film Institute and the Rio De Janeiro Film Festival. negativlandlab.com


Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, dual projection, expanded cinema, experimental, film, hand-processing, international, landscape, performance, triple projection, Uncategorized


The Films of Rhody Streeter and Tony Ganz
Presented by White Light Cinema
With Rhoden “Rhody” Streeter in Person!


The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, September 16th, 7:30 pm, $7-10


White Light Cinema is pleased to present this program of the quirky, idiosyncratic, and occasionally ironic early 1970’s short documentaries of Rhody Streeter and Tony Ganz.

Over the course of two years, Streeter and Ganz produced a series of amazing films that chronicle little-seen aspects of American society and culture of time. Some are sincere looks at more serious subjects (a men’s shelter, a youth social service organization), others explore in miniature more eclectic aspects of American life: a kitschy honeymoon hotel in the Poconos, the Sun City retirement community in Arizona, Muzak, and a former Times Square freak show business. Even when the films are at their most ironic and wryly humorous, Streeter and Ganz never resort to overt mockery.

A number of the films found success at the time – many of them were produced for the television series The Great American Dream Machine, a weekly satirical variety television series, produced in New York City by WNET and broadcast on PBS from 1971 to 1973; others aired on The 51st State, a WNET New York local news program; many played extensively on the film festival circuit.

Streeter went on to make television documentaries in Louisville, and later worked in Media Services with the Kentucky Department of Education for twenty-five years. Ganz entered the film industry, working mostly as a producer of television films, but also for the theatrical features Gung Ho and Clean and Sober, among others.

Program Details:
(1971, 3 min, 16mm)
A moody look at smalltime investors contemplating their changing fortunes, as reflected in the fluctuations of stock prices on the big board. Based on The Board, the producers of The Great American Dream Machine hired Streeter and Ganz to make additional short films.

(1972, 8 min, 16mm)
A grimly amusing look at life in Sun City, Arizona, a gated retirement community. The Best of Your Life was the first film that Streeter and Ganz made for The Great American Dream Machine.


(1972, 10 min, 16mm)
A portrait of a longstanding shelter for homeless men on the Bowery in New York City, based on observation and conversations with the residents and employees of the shelter. “Interesting to note in almost all my films the narrative thread is developed strictly out of the interviews I think this film with its 20 seconds of Tony’s voiceover is one of the few times I’ve used a narrator.” (more…)

Filed under: 16mm, archival, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, Uncategorized


Locally Made Short Work


The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, August 25th, 7 pm, $7-10


Chicagoland Shorts Vol. 2 is the latest installment in a series that celebrates the vastness of the Chicago experience. This 90-minute program brings together the best of experimental, dance, narrative, and documentary short films from a diverse range of perspectives and joins them into one expansive, rich and engaging evening of cinema.

The ten filmmakers featured in Vol. 2 represent some of the most original and innovative voices in Chicago. They include up-and-coming talents as well as established auteurs whose award-winning films have screened at festivals nationally and internationally including Cannes, Tribeca, Sundance, Berlin, Vienna, Rotterdam, and Chicago International.

Chicagoland Shorts Vol. 2 is presented by Full Spectrum Features NFP, a Chicago-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization committed to increasing diversity in the media arts by producing, exhibiting, and supporting the work of women, LGBTQ, and minority filmmakers while raising awareness of social justice issues and inspiring change.


Curated by Beckie Stocchetti of the Chicago Film Office and Dan Rybicky of Columbia College and Kartemquin Films, the program will include the following ten short films:

“Edison” by Daniel Davison
“Parietal Guidance” by Lonnie Edwards
“VIDEOWAVE_056” by Aren Zolninger
“Violets” by Jim Vendiola
“Marquee” by Brian Zahm
“The Fever” by Eunhye Hong Kim
“Ayinde’s Video Game” by Shiri Burson
“Run of Press” by Mina Fitzpatrick
“Bound” by Monica Thomas
“Girls Love Horses” by Jennifer Reeder


FULL SPECTRUM FEATURES NFP is a Chicago-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization committed to increasing diversity in the media arts by producing, exhibiting, and supporting the work of women, LGBTQ, and minority filmmakers. We also aim to educate the public about important social and cultural issues, utilizing the power of cinema to foster understanding in our communities. http://fullspectrumfeatures.com/

Filed under: artist in attendance, experimental, film, narrative, video

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