1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

Ism, Ism, Ism: Umbrales

Experimental Women Filmmakers from Latin America

Wednesday, November 13th, 7 PM, FREE

Ism, Ism, Ism
Umbrales: Experimental Women Filmmakers from Latin America
(Various Artists, 1955-2003, Various Countries, digital and 16mm, 79 min total)

This program showcases female filmmakers who sought to carve out a place within the male-dominated world of Latin American independent audiovisual production. Key works, such as Argentine filmmaker Narcisa Hirsch’s Come Out (1971), exemplify the defiant position toward gendered and essentializing aesthetics expected of Latin American women filmmakers. This program includes pioneering Uruguayan filmmaker Lydia García Millán’s Color (1955), one of the first abstract experimental films from Latin America; the politically charged Super 8 experiments by Puerto Rican underground artist Poli Marichal; and a recent video essay by Mexican artist Ximena Cuevas.

Come Out
(Narcisa Hirsch, Argentina, 1971, 11 min.)

Color
(Lydia Garcia, Uruguay, 1955, 4 min.)

Desnudo con alcatraces
(Silvia Gruner, Mexico, 1986, 2 min.)

Popsicles
(Gloria Camiruaga, Chile/US, 1982-1984, 5 min.)

Umbrales
(Marie Louise Alemann, Argentina, 1967, 19 min.)

Paracas
(Cecilia Vicuña, Chile/US, 1983, 19 min.)

Devil in the Flesh
(Ximena Cuevas, Mexico, 2003, 5 min.)

Copacabana
(Vivian Ostrovsky, Brazil, 1983, 10 min.)

Blues Tropical
(Poli Marichal, Puerto Rico, 1982, 4 min.)

About the Ism, Ism, Ism Series:
Ism, Ism, Ism: Experimental Cinema in Latin America (Ismo, Ismo, Ismo: Cine experimental en América Latina) was organized by Los Angeles Filmforum as part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Ism, Ism, Ism surveys Latin America’s vibrant experimental production from the 1930s through today. www.ismismism.org

Ism, Ism, Ism is accompanied by a bilingual publication, Ism, Ism, Ism / Ismo, Ismo, Ismo: Experimental Cinema in Latin America (Jesse Lerner and Luciano Piazza, editors, University of California Press, 2017) placing Latino and Latin American experimental cinema within a broader dialogue that explores different periods, cultural contexts, image-making models, and considerations of these filmmakers within international cinema. Available worldwide, https://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520296084.

Lead support for Ism, Ism, Ism is provided through grants from the Getty Foundation. Significant additional support comes from the Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

This program is produced in partnership with The Block Museum, Filmfront, and Comfort Station.



Filed under: experimental, feminism, film, Free Screening!, social justice, video

Duke & Battersby

short works by Emily Vey Duke & Cooper Battersby

Friday, November 22nd, 7 PM, $7-$10

(2001-2019, Canada / United States, digital, 52 min + discussion)

Cooper Battersby (b. 1971, Penticton British Columbia, Canada) and Emily Vey Duke (b. 1972, Halifax Nova Scotia, Canada) have been working collaboratively since June 1994. They work in printed matter, installation, new media, curation and sound, but their primary practice is in single-channel video. Between discussions of life, death, and sexuality, Duke & Battersby craft a simultaneously cute, violent, and emotive universe, starting a poetic and psychoanalytic dialog between humans, animals, plants, and their camera.

Bad Ideas for Paradise
(2001, 20 min)

Lesser Apes
(2011, 12 min)

Here is Everything
(2013, 14 min)

Civil Twilight at the Vernal Equinox
(2019, 6 min, Work in Progress)

This program is produced in partnership with The Block Museum.



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, environmental, essay, experimental, feminism, new media

The Tinder Trilogy by Sam Bam

 

Sam Bam screening at the Nightingale

The Tinder Trilogy (with special guest Werner Herzog’s pen)!

Wednesday, September 25, 7 PM
$7-$10 (suggested donation–cash only)
1084 N Milwaukee Ave


Artist in person!

The Tinder Trilogy is a series of short films by Sam Bam that originated over a need to hide her sex worker identity from a potential suitor. Filmed during a series of first dates over the course of a year, this series chronicles Sam’s attempt to turn Tinder into her personal production house, as well as her simultaneous retirement from sex work and foray into civvy dating for the first time in her adult life. As she loses her sex worker identity, she adopts the persona of filmmaker in order to cope with the loss of her core creative outlet—the world building of her work persona. In the process, she learns to harness the fearlessness required of sex workers into a rabbit hole of hyper-creative DIY strategies and self-education.

The films themselves are not depictions of sex worker labor, but rather a testament to how our own personal experiences can shine through our art (and life) in unexpected ways.

Films screened:

Cool Lawyer (Sam Bam, 2018)
An attempt to evade the classic first date question “What do you do for work?”

Sam Bam's movie Cool Lawyer

I Owe The Chicago Public Library $367 And They Should Forgive Me (Sam Bam, 2019)
An homage to the French New Wave that brings a face to the classist injustice of late fees.

#1 Party Guest “The Lost Film” (Sam Bam, 2019)
This film is what happens when you protest Werner Herzog for not following you on Instagram, only to steal his pen and use it as bait for your experimental film trilogy.

Eddie Vedder’s Girlfriend (Sam Bam, 2019)
A collage of the male gaze that outs all the homophobes in the room.

 

After the screening there will be a discussion and Q+A.* Participation in the Q+A will enter you into the free raffle to win the pen Sam stole from Werner Herzog. So bring your questions!

*There will also be cake and surprise special guests.



Filed under: artist in attendance, autobiography, feminism, performance

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