RECYCLED CINEMA

Work by  Roger Beebe
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series
Roger Beebe in person!

beebe

Monday, April 20,  7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

Filmmaker/curator/professor Roger Beebe returns to Chicago with a contemporary expanded cinema program titled RECYCLED CINEMA that will immerse the audience in imagery and sound. Best known for his live cinema performances, Beebe will host an evening of carefully crafted and meticulously timed multi-projector experiments that pull from his practice of appropriating educational, industrial and mass-cultural imagery. Decidely analogue, Bebee intentionally places the projectors and the projectionist (himself) in the room with the audience. His performances often incorporate archival material to build loose themes and visual synchronicity into accumulative, experimental documentaries pieces.

Program Details:
Strip Mall Trilogy (2001, 9:10, super8mm)
“The Strip Mall Trilogy” is a series of three city symphonies that attempt to liberate color, sound, and form from the sprawling consumerist landscape of postmodern America. Part 1, “Green Means Go,” presents fragments of color over a musique concrete soundtrack composed of sounds recorded at the strip mall. Part 2, “The Abecedaire,” wrestles (and later plays) with alphabetic form extracted and abstracted from the signs of commerce of which they are normally a part. Part 3, “X-formations,” tries to argue that there is, in fact, beauty after strip malls. Let’s hope so. Parts 1 and 3 were edited entirely in camera.

Famous Irish Americans (2003, 8:00, digital video)
Who’s your famous Irish American? Georgia O’Keefe? William McKinley? Sandra Day O’Connor? How about Shaquille O’Neal? This videotape is a secret history of some of our most overlooked Irish-American citizens; a hyperflat exploration of race, America, and the limits of binary thought.

Money Changes Everything (2009-2011, 5:00, 3x16mm)
Three days in Las Vegas, Nevada; three different visions of the discarded past and of the constantly renewed future. A three-part portrait of a town in transformation: a suburban utopia in the desert, a cancerous sprawl of unplanned development, a destination for suicides.

S A V E (2006, 5:15, 16mm)
A disused gas station offers a curious imperative to passersby: “SAVE.” A riddle posed in the form of architecture: what is there to save? One more installment in the history of Americans pointing their cameras at gas stations; an attempt to figure out something about where we’ve been, where we’re headed, and what’s been left behind. The first part of “S A V E” was edited entirely in camera.

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Filed under: 16mm, archival, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, performance, Super 8mm

A GEOGRAPHER’S LENS

Multimedia Methods and
Scholar-Activist Praxis
Presented by the Subconference of the
Annual Meeting of the AAG

rareearth

Wednesday, April 22, 6 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

Join us for an evening of discussion and excerpts from four films with four documentarian-geographers. In coordination with the Subconference of the Association of American Geographers’ annual meeting, this event will provide an opportunity for an off-site, trans- and non-disciplinary, multi-method mingling of idea makers and media makers. While exploring different content in different geographic settings, the four panelists’ pieces take up the overlapping themes of economic, state, and extra-judicial violence amidst the quest for endless accumulation and surplus. The works explore the the prison and military industrial complexes, contested spaces of ‘urban renewal,’ and sites of accumulation and abandonment ranging from the body to the Mojave Desert to the city of Detroit and beyond.  We will gather to discuss process-oriented questions about filmmaking and public scholarship for liberatory social change. The event will comprise a panel discussion with the four filmmakers (Elizabeth Knafo, Amanda Matles, Alexis Mitchell, and Brett Story) moderated by Annie Spencer, as well as excerpts from their latest films.  We will reserve ample time for audience discussion.

Rare Earth (2014) // Elizabeth Knafo
From the Mojave desert, to the Pacific seabed, to the surface of the moon, the rush for rare earth minerals is afoot. “Rare Earth”explores the re-opening of an historically toxic rare earth mine in the California desert, and the intensifying land rush for the high-tech minerals across the world. The work is a portrait of changing desert landscapes and the residents who grapple with the impacts of industrial mining. “Rare Earth” traces the toxic and transformative legacy of treasure hunting in the American West—a legacy of speculation, produced scarcity and the social violence of resource extraction—deepening in our era of global climate change.

Rerooting the Motor City: Notes on a City in Transformation (2013) // Paper Tiger
This is Detroit as seen by Paper Tiger Television members, Maria Byck, Amanda Matles, Nadia Mohamed, Adrienne Silverman. From food deserts, to the plans to “rightsize” the city, Detroiters resist, rework, and remain resilient given the social and ecological failures of post-industrial global capitalism. With a critical lens on race and class dynamics, this documentary weaves together segments on Detroit’s labor history, the roots of Detroit’s urban agriculture movement, a critical look at philanthro-capitalism and its relationship to urban renewal, as well as media (mis)representations of a city in transformation.

STEALTH (2014) // Chase Joynt and Alexis Mitchell
By merging hidden camera footage from a patient’s hysterectomy, with interviews of the objects used in these procedures and spaces, STEALTH poignantly and humorously mobilizes ‘sousveillance’ to subvert the perspective of surveilling machinery. Through a triangulation of corporeal, medical and military technologies, STEALTH provocatively points to previously unexplored histories and relationships between inanimate objects and human bodies.

The Prison in Twelve Landscapes (in progress) // Brett Story
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes is a non-fiction work about the prison from the places we least expect to find it: the front yards, public spaces, and social rituals of everyday life. A meditation on the prison and its geographic disappearance in the era of mass incarceration, the doc unfolds as a cinematic journey through a series of landscapes across the United States where prisons do work and affect lives: an anti-sex offender pocket park in Los Angeles, a congregation of ex-incarcerated chess players shut out of the formal labor market, the overnight buses that carry visitors to far away prisons, an Appalachian coal town betting its future on the promise of prison jobs, and a host of other unexpected spaces.

The event is happening in collaboration with the Subconference of the Annual Meeting of the AAG. The Subconference was created to offer a space for radical academics and activists to think critically and creatively about the connections between academic geography, higher education, and social/political change. The subconference is an evolving ambition. Each year we seek out new ways to creatively appropriate the critical mass of the AAG, using the space of the conference as an asset for forging solidarities and facilitating collective exchanges between people who are already engaged in radical, socially transformative work in all the disparate locations that we come from.

Annie Spencer, curator of A GEOGRAPHER’S LENS,  is a writer, organizer, media maker, and doctoral candidate in economic geography at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Spencer’s work examines state improvement schemes, accumulation, addiction, and everyday wageless life in the post-American century.



Filed under: archival, documentary, experimental, found footage, lecture, narrative, new media, surveillance, Uncategorized, video

California Picture Book

Recent Bay Area Film and Video

Vanessa O'Neill — Suspension

Vanessa O’Neill — Suspension

Friday, April 24, 8 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL
Organized by Mary Helena Clark and tooth
Mary Helena Clark in person!

 

Michael Bucuzzo — Orion’s Belt (2011, 5 minutes, 16mm > video)
What happens to the body when it dies? What happens to the mind when it forgets the body is dead?

Zachary Epcar — A Time Shared Unlimited (2010, 10 minutes, 16mm + video)
Near-future leisure time activities and anxieties as a series of minor incidents continually interrupted, alternating between an overcrowded virtual space and a virtually abandoned city space.

Christina Kolozsvary — Nocturnes for Anatomers (2012, 6 minutes, video)
Nocturnes for Anatomers is a surrealist trip to the doctors office. A young woman suffers from mysterious illnesses caused by her neglect for her body, and her hidden desires. Diagnoses of the patient follow the charts of the cosmos, as anatomy and astrology combine.

tooth — palms (2011, 3 minutes, super 8)
a california portrait. obscured investigation of the myth of “paradise”. palm trees are a non-native plant species to california, and their roots span equal parts as far underground as the trees tower above the earth. within this, an overlapping symbology.

Mary Helena Clark — The Sound of Running in my Voice (2014, 5 minutes, DV)
We ape naturalism.

Zach Iannazzi — California Picture Book (2013, 14 minutes, 16mm)

Kent Long — The Waves (2003, 8 minutes, 16mm)
An interpretation of water’s eternal patterns of light and sound.

Vanessa O’Neill — Suspension (2008, 10 minutes, dual 16mm)
A toned and black-and-white reel, layered to create subtle shifts of hue and tone of abstracted seascape.

John Davis — Demolished Every Second (2014, 4:25 minutes, 16mm > video)
This short work utilizes imprints from Soviet-era film leader culled from dozens of films viewed while working as an artist in residence in Dushanbe, Tajikistan in 2014. The material was largely 1980’s-era educational and propaganda films that contained a broad range of content, but had only subtle variations on more or less the same leader. Foregrounding the often ignored hand-written or machine printed artifacts found on leader, the imprints become the primary source material for a psychotronic audio/visual salvo set to an original score.



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, video

E.S.P TV

Live Taping at The Nightingale

esptv

Saturday, April 25, 7 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

E.S.P. TV is a live TV studio that hybridizes technologies old and new to realize synthetic environments for performance while also exposing the process of production.

The COAST TO COAST  tour will travel to 12 locations across the US in April 2015. For this project, a large ENG news van has been outfitted as a modified mobile broadcast unit. The van houses analog and digital broadcast consoles with additional internet and web ready capabilities.

The tour encompasses live taping events, exhibitions, screenings, and artists talks. Fifty plus artists  participating in this televisual project will create new works with a focus on transmission and simulation. In an effort to better document the broader spectrum of cultural activity, E.S.P TV teams up with  museums, galleries, project spaces, and DIY venues.  In addition to live performances, E.S.P TV will present a traveling video program at each location.  The events will be both recorded and streamed live, and made available on our website and on our television program.

The Chicago taping will include

Performances by
ONO
Nick Ciontea
Matchess
Mothergirl
Video works by
Thomas Dexter & Heather Dewey-Hagborg
Fern Silva
peter burr
Sabrina Ratté
Jeremy Rotsztain
Jeremy Couillard

 

Directed by Scott Kiernan and Victoria Keddie, this expansive project utilizes a mobile television studio to explore the artist dialogue with broadcast transmission, analog and digital media, and televisual liveness. Each live taping event is the realization of an artists’ collaboration with Kiernan and Keddie.  These events are taped live with a crew of cameramen, sound engineer, and video mixing team in front of an audience. The recorded events air on Manhattan Neighborhood Network public television weekly, as well as online, and have been exhibited internationally.

E.S.P. TV has held over 50 live taping events internationally and has aired over 70 episodes to date and has worked with various venues including: The Whitney Museum of American Art, New Museum, Museum of Arts and Design, Printed Matter, Millennium Film Workshop, New School, Rawson Projects, Recess (NYC); Interstate Projects, Spectacle Theater, Issue Project Room, Roulette (Brooklyn); Franklin Street Works (Stamford, CT), Liminal Space (Oakland, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Ballroom Marfa (Marfa, TX), General Public (Berlin),  STORE (Dresden), Studio XX (Montreal), Kling and Bang Gallery (Reykjavik) and Pallas Projects (Dublin).

E.S.P. TV broadcasts every Tuesday night at 10PM on Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN). Channel 67 in Manhattan, as well as online at www.mnn.org.  All episodes are then posted online on our website and Vimeo platforms.  E.S.P. TV now also airs on Wednesdays with Comcast Cable 66/966 or Verizon Fios 29/30 in Philadelphia at 11:30PM.



Filed under: animation, experimental, narrative, video

KALEIDOSCOPIC VISIONS

Films by Saul Levine
Saul Levine in person!

SaulShowStill4

Saturday, May 2, 8 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

“Saul Levine is the foremost dissenting filmmaker in America. With about 35 years of consistent production behind him, and no signs of fatigue, he can show us the shape of a life passionately and uncompromisingly devoted to filmmaking. His works are high-energy messages of friendship, records of sexual love and political activism, radiated by humor, prophetic anger, loneliness and even though rarely, representing repose.” — P. Adams Sitney (**)

“A friend of mine who worked for Yale’s AV department showed me three films that changed my life. Maya Deren’s AT LAND, CHOREOGRAPHY FOR THE CAMERA, and Viking Eggling’s SYMPHONIE DIAGONAL. From Deren’s films I saw that cinemas ability to represent figures in time and space poetically could be a paradigm of consciousness; Eggling showed me that nonfigurative shapes could evolve and change musically. I saw that I could use film to understand the world around me directly. I could also use editing to make relationships between what I was seeing in front of the camera and what was going on in my mind. I stopped making editing decisions based on story and started making them based on shape, memory and association.” -Saul Levine (*)

Program Notes:

The program title KALEIDOSCOPIC VISIONS was inspired by P. Adams Sitney’s description of Saul’s unique style of shooting and cutting as “…fused with the kalei­do­scop­ic fury of mem­o­ry…”. The program selects films by Saul Levine from 1973 to 2011. The films represent roughly three of Saul’s major formal approaches to the small gauge formats of Regular 8mm (presented as a digital transfers and a 16mm blow up) and Super 8mm (presented in Super 8mm and 16mm blow ups).

The first part of the program, ON THE SPOT (1973) and NEARSIGHT (1977-78), showcase Saul’s early rigorous in-camera work that directly responds to his subjects. Saul uses single frame shooting, repetitious movement, and variations in exposure to create “nonfigurative shapes that evolve and change musically” (*). These two films differentiate themselves from structuralist films of that era by their personal and intuitive sense. In Saul’s films we feel through his camerawork an emotionally raw response to the world that allows the viewer to “hitch a ride” into the author’s “state of mind” or “level of consciousness” (***).

The middle of the program, BOPPING THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA BLUE  and A FEW TUNES GOING OUT: GROOVE TO GROOVE, represent two films from Saul’s innovative body of Super 8mm Sound work that uses splicing to layer sounds over images from varied places or moments. Saul’s frame by frame cutting technique challenges the apparatus of the projector to represent records of “real time”. It exploits the difference in time and space of twenty six frames between the projected image and the projector’s sound head. By doing this he creates experiences of coinciding events within a single moment- multiple thoughts, memories, personal, political, local or global. Both from the series A FEW TUNES GOING OUT, the second film GROOVE TO GROOVE, shows Saul editing with this single frame and two frame method.

A comedic break, AS IS IS, is a personal and insightful portrait of the struggles of owning a pet chameleon.

The last portion of the program shows Saul’s recent experimentations of recording light with the Super 8mm camera in his working series titled: LIGHT LICKS:BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON.  JAMMING reflects on a 2004 demonstration at the National Republican Convention in New York while I WANT TO PAINT IT BLACK is “inspired by the absence of a contemporary Jewish community” (**) in Prague. Both films show the rich visual records Saul captures by spilling light into the frame beyond the camera’s aperture (see the still below)

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Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, painting, Super 8mm, Uncategorized, video

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