1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

FLEEGIX

Friday, August 2nd, 7 PM, $5-10 suggested donation – cash only

FLEEGIX is a science-fiction film set on Earth,  although some of the population have become convinced that they are in fact living on the planet Mars.

The film investigates the nature of belief systems which overlap, co-exist, and create conflict in any human society.
Its subject is the nature of reality. It takes place in a recognizeable world of parks, parking lots, gas stations and video stores, which makes the episodes stranger and more tangible. It does not create a fantasy world: the extraordinary is mapped onto a recognizable landscape.
The film is inspired by and loosely adapted from on a Young Adult novel by Daniel Pinkwater, Alan Mendelsohn, the Boy From Mars, in which alienated high school students Leonard and Alan escape boredom through developing telepathic powers and learn to travel to other dimensions overlapping their own. I have received permission from the author to make a film that is a creative interpretation of his book.

The film was shot on color 16mm and includes both live action, stop motion and hand drawn animated segments. The appearance of animation in the narrative is to illustrate propaganda, such as depictions of newsworthy events on Mars.
This film is an organism that grows and continues to develop a web of connected motifs and ideas.
FLEEGIX is constructed through the accumulation of short scenes that echo and lead into each other, making connections across time and space. It is a a “Situationist Fairy story” …, a non-linear narrative that is based around a series of surprising images, that nonetheless describes an entire world.

At the heart of the film is the question as to how Fleegix (a beverage enjoyed by Martians) is manufactured.The film details further conflict among New York “Potato-Eyed” Martians who express themselves in animated movement, and the Hand Shadow Punks of Baltimore, who represent a pre-cinematic faction.
The film proposes various absurd answers to this question, and the dispute takes on symbolic and mythological proportions.

Programmed by Nabil 


Filed under: 16mm, anarchy, animation, artist in attendance, environmental, expanded cinema, experimental, film, music, new media

Lydia Moyer’s The Forcing

Preceded by Latham Zearfoss’s WHITE BALANCE

Saturday, June 15, 7 PM, $7-10 suggested donation – cash only

Artists in person!

The Nightingale is thrilled to welcome Lydia Moyer to screen her meditative collage-like critique of contemporary life, The Forcing, preceded by Latham Zearfoss’s similarly elucidative short work WHITE BALANCE.

The Forcing, 2018, 46 min

An insistent collage of images and sound that muddles the quiet detail of flora and fauna with the chaotic noise of mass upheaval, building tension through the offset of sound and image. Made in response to the turbulence of contemporary American life, acknowledging how much is experienced through screens. The Forcing asks viewers to ride the waves of the capitalocene, moving between original and existing materials toward an unheroic encounter with the beautiful and the terrifying. Boundaries between climate change and the struggle for social justice dissolve relying on the energy of sound to place them side-by-side on the cosmic continuum.

WHITE BALANCE, 2018, 9 min

This experimental documentary seeks out moments of cognitive dissonance around multifaceted, liberal ideas of whiteness. Further, it questions how power circulates as ideology, via material and immaterial means. Paired with an unnerving original score, the camera lands on episodic vignettes that unpack white identity as a socially constructed set of power relations, and the color white as an aesthetic experience ranging from humdrum to stunning to repulsive.

 

Lydia Moyer is a contemporary video and print artist who works primarily with themes of feminism, the environment, and history. She often appropriates existing materials and objects and blurs the premise of non-fiction. Her work has been featured a number of national and international exhibitions. Aside from her artwork, Moyer also works as an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia.

Latham Zearfoss works in Chicago, where they produce time-based images, objects and experiences about selfhood and otherness. Outside of the studio, they contribute to collective motions toward joy and reflection through social projects such as a queer dance party (Chances Dances), a critical space for white allyship (Make Yourself Useful), and an itinerant conference on socially-engaged art (Open Engagement). Latham graduated from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a BFA in 2008 and the University of Illinois at Chicago with an MFA in 2011. They have exhibited their work, screened their videos, and DJed internationally and all over the U.S.



Filed under: artist in attendance, environmental, experimental

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