1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

blue fish

blue fish Japanese Environmental
Documentary Film Festival


Sundays between October 1 – November 19:

Sunday, October 1 at 7 pm: ASHES TO HONEY (Hitomi Kamanaka)
Sunday, October 15 at 7 pm: HOLY ISLAND (Aya Hanabusa)
Sunday, November 5 at 6:30 pm: UNCANNY TERRAIN by Chicago-based filmmakers Junko Kajino and Ed M. Koziarski (with post-screening talk)
Sunday, November 19 at 7 pm: THE OCEAN’S BLESSING (Masayuki Tōjō)

The earth is breathing; so are humans. This fall, between October 1 and November 19, the Nightingale Cinema presents Japanese environmental documentaries to reflect upon humans’ relationship with nature. The films introduce the lives of people such as fishermen and farmers of Iwai-shima island who have been protesting against and stopping the construction of a nuclear power plant since 1982, as well as organic farmers in Fukushima who have been going through the aftermath of the 2012 nuclear power plant accident. This festival will expand the knowledge of Chicago’s urban audiences about global environmental issues and synchronize contemporary concerns about the planet through the lens of the not-so-Far East.
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Filed under: artist in attendance, Asian, documentary, environmental, international

REVOLUTION IN ROJAVA

US Midwest Speaking Tour 2017
Presented by Chicago Committee for
Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava

Saturday April 22nd at 4:00 pm, $5-10 suggest donation
The Nightingale (1084 N. Milwaukee)

 

Join the Chicago Committee for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava and Black Rose Chicago for a speaking event and fundraiser, to hear eyewitnesses, a YPG volunteer and experts give an up-to-date account of this vital and fascinating struggle, and have your questions about its incredibly complex circumstances answered.

Organizers:
Chicago committe for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava
https://www.facebook.com/ccskr/
Black Rose/Rosa Negra Chicago
https://www.facebook.com/blackrosechicago/

In 2017 the war with fundamentalism rages on for the Syrian Democratic Forces– northern Syria’s multiethnic armed coalition animated by the Democratic Confederalist ideology. They are currently at the threshold of the capital of al-Baghdadi’s brutal “caliphate,” Raqqa.

The northern Syrian territories, liberated from the control of both the Ba’athist regime and local jihadists, are also facing serious challenges, from the direct ground invasion and attacks of Erdoğan’s increasingly authoritarian Turkey to conflict with the Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq, all while struggling to rebuild a ravaged landscape, and still advancing an unprecedented experiment in egalitarian, participatory democracy and the elimination of ancient patriarchical norms.

At the same time, the revolutionaries’ tactical cooperation with imperialist powers, the US and Russia, as well as with the Assad regime, has sparked significant controversy in numerous circles on the left.

LIST OF SPEAKERS:
Mike Fonda
Ferit Kut
Gönül Düzer

BIOS:
Mike Fonda joined the People’s Protection Units (YPG) in the spring of 2015 where he served on the front line in Cizîrê‎ Canton, Syria as an infantryman, linguist and interrogator. Prior to joining the YGP, Mr. Fonda served in the Marine Corps for 6 years as an infantryman and linguist, deploying to Iraq twice and receiving the Purple Heart. After the Marine Corps, Mr. Fonda deployed as a Defense Contractor to Iraq and Afghanistan as a Counterintelligence Specialist. He holds a Master’s Degree in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies from the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Ferit Kut was fired from his position as a lecturer at Dicle University in February 2015 in retaliation for his advocacy for the right to native-language education. He is a PhD candidate in Pedagogy of Early Child Development at Yeditepe University and holds an MA in the same field from Dicle University. Currently, he is a board member of the Kurdish Cultural Center of Illinois.

Gönül Düzer is an activist Zaza woman who grew up in Istanbul, Turkey. She received an International Relations BA at Middle East Technical University and a Global Political Economy MA at University of Kassel. Her master’s thesis was “A Feminist Analysis of Women Workers’ Engagement in Labor Resistances: a Case Study of Istanbul’s Garment Industry”. She has been an activist on labor, gender and immigration issues in Turkey, Germany and the US. She has worked as a waiter, salesperson and labor organizer. Currently she is working as a math tutor in Chicago. She is a board member of the Kurdish Cultural Center of Illinois, and a member of Chicago Committee for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava.



Filed under: anarchy, autobiography, environmental, feminism, international, social justice, Uncategorized

PETER HUTTON

Swimming in the Valley of the Moon
White Light Cinema and the Nightingale
present Three Films by Peter Hutton

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, November 20th, 7 pm, $7-10

This year, the experimental film world lost one of its keenest eyes.

Peter Hutton was an elegant ruffian, a casual radical, insistent on looking deeply, on seeing as seeking, on stilling oneself and attuning one’s sense of time to match the place. The films tonight, like most of his oeuvre, are presented in silence.

Hutton’s films find their place in the trajectory of landscape art. The twin artistic influences that dominated Hutton’s early creative life were East Asian aesthetic philosophies and his experience as a merchant marine. He remarked often that this trained him to see. It was a skill that he continued to hone over four and a half decades. He worked slowly: shooting and exploring, watching and re-watching, maintaining and honing a clarity of vision as patient as it was explorative. His films are transportive—not simply to the times and places of their making, but for our senses of seeing. This work is gorgeous—it can make celluloid fetishists of the most hardened viewer—and leaves the viewer in a state of grace, unencumbered by trying to explain its virtues. In addition to the internal composition and tonality of his images, his film are guided by his dedication to revealing stillness in motion and motion in stillness, a devotion to the poethics of sequence and a trust in both his subjects: those opposite his lens and those before the screen. We are made more patient through his films.

Tonight’s screening features a very early work, made in graduate school, which diaristically traces his life at the time and his Bay Area countercultural milieu; one of the many excellent films he made of the eponymous river over the thirty-plus years he lived in the Hudson River Valley, teaching at Bard; and a city symphony for Łódź in the midst of a transformation. We hope you can join us for this too-rare opportunity to honor the life and work of Peter Hutton. (JM)

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Filed under: 16mm, autobiography, documentary, environmental, experimental, film, travel

THE LANTHANIDE SERIES

An Experimental Documentary by Erin Espelie
Filmmaker in Attendance!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, September 22nd, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Erin Espelie to present her experimental documentary about rare earth elements (the lanthanides), black mirrors (from obsidian to iPads), and how technology is reshaping the way we record the present and replay the past.

From the portals of personal computing devices to ancient obsidian mirrors, optical tools control how people see, foresee, record, and remember their lives. The Lanthanide Series ( 2014, USA/France/UK, 72 minutes) meditates on how we frame and understand the world through such material means and instruments, with a reliance on certain chemical elements and the people who we love.

“Part poetry, part chemistry lesson, part landscape film, part cinematic exploration, part history and geography lesson, part environmental revelation,part magic. The Lanthanide Series is something new under the sun.” – Scott MacDonald

“The Lanthanide Series fuses poetry and science to create a thrillingly uncategorizable work.” – Anthology Film Archives

Preceded by Kari Altman’s R-U-INS

 

ERIN ESPELIE is a writer, editor, and filmmaker, with a background in the research sciences. Her poetic, nonfiction films have shown around the world at the New York Film Festival, the British Film Institute’s London Film Festival, the Whitechapel Gallery, the International Film Festival Rotterdam, the Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival, the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Imagine Science Film Festival, and more. Espelie currently holds an assistant professorship in Film Studies and Critical Media Practices at the University of Colorado Boulder; she serves as an Associate Director of the Center for Environmental Journalism and is editor in chief of Natural History magazine, a centenarian publication for which she has worked since 2001. erinespelie.com

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, artist in attendance, documentary, environmental, essay, experimental, found footage, geography, history, landscape, poetry, science, Uncategorized, video

DIFFICULT BUT POSSIBLE

A Supplement to Rules, Tools and Fools

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, September 18th, 8 pm, $7-10

A selection of shorts surrounding not just the the how-to but to-how. Bearing fully in mind the notion of utopia as a no-place, Difficult but Possible animates the notion of a diffuse set of not-yet-places, of worlds unbuilt, of worlds unbuilding, of the crazy-eyed mirage we keep moving toward. Together, we explore terrains fantastical, domestic, speculative and utopian; we learn to dodge the camera all around us and to stare deeply into and through others; we receive allegories from beyond underground weather and beyond Drop City, venture into cited non-sites and pick up some skills along the way.

Co-presented by Spudnik Press, in conjunction with Rules, Tools and Fools,
curated by Jaclyn Jacunski and Jason Pallas;
made possible through the generosity of the Chicago Film Archives,
and the sense of possibility and adventure of the artists

Programmed by Jesse Malmed

 

Mike Lopez | Whole Earth Land | 2016 | 10 minutes  | Playthrough Performance

Gene Bernofsky | 1993 | 1980 | 9 minutes | 16mm to Video | Sound

JoAnn Elam | The Last Whole Earth Catalog | 1967-1990 | 20 minutes | 8mm to Video | Silent

Jillian Mayer | Makeup Tutorial – How to Hide from Cameras | 2013 | 3.5 minutes | Video | Sound

Sam Green | Clear Glasses | 2008 | 4 minutes | Video | Sound

Jennifer Proctor | Alternative Forms of Energy | 2005 | 5 minutes | Super 8 to Video | Sound

Ben Russell | Trypps 7 (Badlands) | 2010 | 10 minutes | S16mm to Video | Sound

 



Filed under: archival, documentary, environmental, essay, experimental, feminism, geography, hand-processing, history, landscape, lecture, new media, performance, social justice, surveillance, video