1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

JAMES FOTOPOULOS

A Retrospective
Artist in Attendance!

 

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday-Sunday, August 4-6th,  $7-10

This August the Nightingale Cinema is happy to present a three night retrospective of Chicago native James Fotopoulos. Featuring past and new video works. Some of these pieces have not been screened in Chicago in over 10 years.

August 4th at 7:30 pm
CHRISTABEL
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2001
USA, 74 min. 16mm/video

“Christabel is an abstract interpretation of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished Gothic poem about female possession. Adhering to the poem’s structure the film is presented in four parts – Two digital video half hour segments and then two short 16mm conclusions. The contemporary relevance of the poem’s symbols and themes is underlined using performance combined with heavy image and sound layering.” —JF

Dignity
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2012
USA, 82 min, video

Agents Mr. Rainbow and Mr. Lamb are sent to an alien planet fighting a civil war. Their mission to destroy a perpetual motion machine is interrupted by their capture. While their interrogations proceed the two men struggle to come to terms with their suffering and pending death.

Dignity uses the minimal structure of a sci-fi B-film, the high artifice of painted backdrops, prosthetic horror effects, psychedelic noise soundtrack and early digital techniques to flesh out the philosophical ideas ranging from the stoic writings Marcus Aurelius to the fantasy prison drawings of Giovanni Battista Piranesi.

August 5th at 5pm
FAMILIES
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2002
USA, 97 min, 16mm.

A hybrid film that intentionally clashes techniques and syntaxes, FAMILIES is a series docufictional vignettes in a rural industrial town as portrayed through Fotopoulous’ singular eye.

“Life in a rural industrial town: a teenage boy, his family, friends and failed attempt at love are investigated through stark black-and-white photography and static long takes. Filmed in a fusion of authentic and staged documentation, with robotic performances by actors and non-actors, the piece meditates on the mundane existence of human and animal life.” —JF

There
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2014
USA, 103 min, video

Lamb is a troubled veteran and his girlfriend, M, is tormented as well. When he’s not working as a security guard in an old warehouse with other unstable vets, Lamb haunts a nightclub frequented by wounded and traumatized ex-soldiers. There he meets a one-armed vet, Thrill, who starts a strange story about the effects of his post-traumatic stress, which unsettles Lamb.

While walking though a forest, Lamb discovers a humanoid carcass and hides it in his basement. At the club he meets an older woman and begins an affair. Soon otherworldly events start to occur and his girlfriend is attacked inside their apartment by mysterious beings.

In the middle of the night the older woman comes over traumatized. She believes she was brought to an underground compound in the forest inhabited by creatures similar to the one Lamb discovered. She insists these aliens are waiting for a signal to attack. Lamb and M build a truck bomb to destroy the compound before it’s too late.  As they drive it to the nuclear power plant the story Thrill told seems about to end.

August 6th at 5pm
The Nest
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2003
USA, 78 min, 16mm

“Filmed in saturated colors on out-of-date film stocks with an aggressive soundtrack, the story of The Nest is told – The marriage of two young professionals unravels after an unnamed accident physically and emotional traumatizes the wife. Government agents, shadowy investigators and transgender beings appear, trying to solve the nervous-breakdown-mystery of secret alien forces that chose the couple as their target. In-camera tricks, drawings, derelict optical printing, miniatures, puppets and prosthetic makeup effects convey the dual collapse of the protagonists’ lives and the film structure as one unified entity.” —JF

The Given
Dir. James Fotopoulos, 2015
USA, 75 min, video

An actress living in New York performs an audition, then goes to meditation and winds up at a party of artists viewing a film.  At home, she and her girlfriend explore buried memories and later nightmares trigger sleepwalking.  Finally, the actress enacts a childlike performance inspired by a Frank Wedekind play.

Mr Fotopoulos will be in attendance for all the screenings.

James Fotopoulos is a filmmaker who began production on his first feature-length film, ZERO (1997), in 1995. In 1998, he founded Fantasma for the production of his second feature, Migrating Forms (1999), and would continue to create a number of critically acclaimed narrative feature films, such as Back Against the Wall (2000), Families (2002), The Nest (2003) and Dignity (2012).

There will be an 15 minute intermission between films.

Programmed by Raul Benitez.



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, dual projection, film

A ROLL FOR PETER

A Tribute Screening for Peter Hutton
Contributors, Michael Wawzenek and           Paul Marcus, in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, March 25th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale is pleased to present A ROLL FOR PETER, a multi-maker, 16mm, black & white tribute to filmmaker Peter Hutton (1944-2016).

Participating filmmakers, Michael Wawzenek and Paul Marcus, in attendance!

Many filmmakers and artists were deeply affected by Peter’s death in June 2016. Twenty-plus former students, colleagues, and admirers of Peter Hutton answered an invitation to shoot A ROLL FOR PETER. The parameters were simple: shoot a single 100 foot roll of 16mm black and white reversal film. The rolls are strung together with black leader separating the rolls, as Peter often separated the single shots in his films. Organized and assembled by Jennifer Reeves and Mark Street, and set on tour thanks to the energies of Eric Theise, this series of pieces speaks to Peter’s strong contemplative aesthetic ethos. Each filmmaker has 2 minutes and 47 seconds of screen time to commune with Peter’s memory, and the collected rolls become more than the sum of their parts.

The organizers write, “Peter Hutton’s contemplative, visually arresting landscape and urban films invite us to take our time within silent cinematic tableaux of place, so that we may discover the beauty of overlooked moments. His carefully composed long-duration shots, whether of city, nature, sea or factory, remind us of the wonder we can discover in the familiar. As we observe with patience, humility and vulnerability, Peter’s work offers us a sanctuary from the frantic, goal oriented state of current visual culture.”

“To me one of the most attractive things about cinema is the fact that you can evoke a sense of mystery, of wonder or curiosity in an environment, a landscape, a room, anyplace, by suspending time. So much of the information that we perceive in film is explained or presented to us in such a way that we can’t help but rationalize it. Once someone leaves us to our own interpretive devices, we can feel a great reprieve and the opportunity to actually give something to the work. It’s like sitting and looking at a painting, at first it might not grab you, but the longer you look at it, the more things reveal themselves.” (Peter Hutton in A Critical Cinema 3, interview with Scott MacDonald)

Program Details:

A Roll for Peter (2016)
16mm and 16mm x 2, black & white, silent, 60 minutes

Participating Filmmakers:
Dominic Angerame, Roddy Bogawa, Cassandra Bull, Jacob Burckhardt, Jesse Cain, David Gatten, Richard Max Gavrich, George Griffin, Eve Heller, Mott Hupfel, Nikolas Jaeger, Amanda Katz & Josh Lewis, Theodore Rex King, Robbie Land, rebecca (marks) leopold, Paul Marcus, Daryl Meador, Mary Beth Reed, Jennifer Reeves, Dave Rodriguez, Peter Rose, Lynne Sachs, Josephine Shokrian, Fern Silva & students, Jordan Stone, Mark Street, G. Anthony Svatek & Zachary Nichols, Eric Theise, Audrey Turner, Michael Wawzenek, Max Weinman & Jake Carl Magee, Timoleon Wilkins

*Catalogues from the Thomas Cole Historic Site screening and tribute on October 9, 2016, which honored and recognized Peter Hutton as a Hudson River Filmmaker, will be available at The Nightingale on Saturday, March 25.

Further information about the film:
http://erictheise.com/films/a-roll-for-peter/

 


Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, dual projection, experimental, film, geography, hand-processing, international, landscape, place, travel, Uncategorized

ALL ROADS LEAVE WINNIPEG

Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns, Aaron Zeghers
Filmmakers in Attendance!

scott-fitzpatrick-dingbats-revenge

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, October 6th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes experimental / expanded filmmakers Scott Fitzpatrick, Clint Enns and Aaron Zeghers, as they flee the ravaged streets of their fair Winnipeg, in search of a warmer, more exotic climate to present their work. “All Roads Leave Winnipeg” is 7-date film tour featuring expanded cinema performances and single channel films by three of Winnipeg’s most notorious cine-stars, Scott Fitzpatrick, Aaron Zeghers and Clint Enns.

the program//

-Part I – Work by Aaron Zeghers-

Holland, Man.
[2015, 20min, 16mm + Super 8 + Digital + Live Sound]

As two growing years pass, Don Zeghers – farmer from Holland, Manitoba – phases out his multi-generational family farm. With experimental photography on Super 8, 16mm and digital mediums, his son Aaron Zeghers follows this life change. The dissolution of the family farm is seen both intimately but also as a microcosm of the modern industrialized world. Nature is contrasted with industrial might in this sentimental and existential portrait of one’s own family. (This will not be performed in Milwaukee)

Everything Turns…
[2016, 12min, Super8]

From 1 to 12 minutes, ‘Everything Turns…’ is a shorthand study of the mythology of numbers. Scientific tradition is adopted then eschewed for rumours, legends and defunct theories from across the ages. As the days turn to night and the seasons pass, the camera pens a year-long record of space, movement and the passing of time in historic locations around the world. This almanac of anthropomorphic numerology is recorded in-camera onto Super 8 using a myriad of experimental techniques. Just like Richter nearly 100 years ago, we will discover that everything turns, everything revolves and everything feels the deep score of time.

(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, artist in attendance, documentary, dual projection, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, history, landscape, performance, science, sound, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized

JOSH LEWIS & SIMON LIU

Recent 16mm Films from Negativland Lab
Filmmakers in Attendance!

chorus_lewis      the-marshes_liu

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, September 29th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Josh Lewis and Simon Liu as they interweave a selection of their 16mm films made by hand at Negativland MPL, an artist-run film lab in New York City, overlapping in their affinity for experimental processing and printing techniques. With Lewis working predominantly in direct chemical manipulation of exposed film surfaces, and Liu utilizing a roaming impressionistic camera paired with multiple passes on a contact printer, the program establishes the centrality of the Film Lab both as an epistemic concept and as a practical mode of production. Each film emerges out of a continual and rapid cycle of exposing, processing, projecting, repeat. As such, the films here are rarely the culmination of a process, but rather worthy points extracted from ongoing lines of investigation.

Program Details:

Pillager
2011 / 16mm / B&W / Optical Sound / 3:30 min. (Josh Lewis)

Chorus
2015 / 16mm / Color / Silent / 17 min. (Josh Lewis)

The Marshes
2016 / 16mm / Color / Sound / 11 min. (Simon Liu)

Doubt 3 & 4
2013 / 16mm / Color / Optical Sound / 6 min. (Josh Lewis)

Shuffle Cove
2016 / 16mm / Color / Sound / 8 min. (Simon Liu)

The Past is Past [but there is something now that I regret like I was about to do it]
2015 / 16mm Dual Projection / B&W / Silent / 6 min. (Josh Lewis)

Harbour City
2015 / 16mm Dual Projection / Color + B&W / Sound / 14 min. (Simon Liu)

I Guess It’s Always Been That Way, I Don’t Know Whether That’s Important Or Not.
2016 [Work In Progress] / 16mm Triple Projection / Color / Silent / 10 min. (Simon Liu)

Doubt 8 & 9
2013 / 16mm / Color / Silent / 6 min. (Josh Lewis)

TRT: 90 min.

 

JOSH LEWIS is an artist and experimental filmmaker working at a fluid intersection between abstraction, documentary, and narrative forms. Coming from a background working in photochemical film processing labs, Lewis’s handmade films explore the boundaries of manual knowledge, bodily struggle, and the persisting enigma of material potential. Lewis has shown work at Anthology Film Archives, Microscope Gallery, Eyebeam, Uniondocs, The Filmmaker’s Co-op NY, and at festivals such as The International Film Festival Rotterdam, Chicago Underground Film Festival, New Orleans Film Festival, Antimatter, Onion City and EDOC: Encuentros del otro cine festival internacional de cine documental. He is a 2015 recipient of a NYFA Film/Video Fellowship. Josh works as a lab technician and is the founder of the artist-run film lab Negativland MPL. joshlewisfilm.com

SIMON LIU lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Born in Hong Kong and raised in both Hong Kong and Stoke-On-Trent, England, he moved to New York in 2006 and received a degree in Film Production from New York University. His work has been exhibited and distributed at festivals and institutions internationally including the International Film Festival Rotterdam, CROSSROADS, EXiS, Microscope Gallery, Mono No Aware IX, WNDX, FilMadrid, Paris Festival of Different & Experimental Cinemas, the British Film Institute and the Rio De Janeiro Film Festival. negativlandlab.com

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, dual projection, expanded cinema, experimental, film, hand-processing, international, landscape, performance, triple projection, Uncategorized