1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

A ROLL FOR PETER

A Tribute Screening for Peter Hutton
Contributors, Michael Wawzenek and           Paul Marcus, in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, March 25th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale is pleased to present A ROLL FOR PETER, a multi-maker, 16mm, black & white tribute to filmmaker Peter Hutton (1944-2016).

Participating filmmakers, Michael Wawzenek and Paul Marcus, in attendance!

Many filmmakers and artists were deeply affected by Peter’s death in June 2016. Twenty-plus former students, colleagues, and admirers of Peter Hutton answered an invitation to shoot A ROLL FOR PETER. The parameters were simple: shoot a single 100 foot roll of 16mm black and white reversal film. The rolls are strung together with black leader separating the rolls, as Peter often separated the single shots in his films. Organized and assembled by Jennifer Reeves and Mark Street, and set on tour thanks to the energies of Eric Theise, this series of pieces speaks to Peter’s strong contemplative aesthetic ethos. Each filmmaker has 2 minutes and 47 seconds of screen time to commune with Peter’s memory, and the collected rolls become more than the sum of their parts.

The organizers write, “Peter Hutton’s contemplative, visually arresting landscape and urban films invite us to take our time within silent cinematic tableaux of place, so that we may discover the beauty of overlooked moments. His carefully composed long-duration shots, whether of city, nature, sea or factory, remind us of the wonder we can discover in the familiar. As we observe with patience, humility and vulnerability, Peter’s work offers us a sanctuary from the frantic, goal oriented state of current visual culture.”

“To me one of the most attractive things about cinema is the fact that you can evoke a sense of mystery, of wonder or curiosity in an environment, a landscape, a room, anyplace, by suspending time. So much of the information that we perceive in film is explained or presented to us in such a way that we can’t help but rationalize it. Once someone leaves us to our own interpretive devices, we can feel a great reprieve and the opportunity to actually give something to the work. It’s like sitting and looking at a painting, at first it might not grab you, but the longer you look at it, the more things reveal themselves.” (Peter Hutton in A Critical Cinema 3, interview with Scott MacDonald)

Program Details:

A Roll for Peter (2016)
16mm and 16mm x 2, black & white, silent, 60 minutes

Participating Filmmakers:
Dominic Angerame, Roddy Bogawa, Cassandra Bull, Jacob Burckhardt, Jesse Cain, David Gatten, Richard Max Gavrich, George Griffin, Eve Heller, Mott Hupfel, Nikolas Jaeger, Amanda Katz & Josh Lewis, Theodore Rex King, Robbie Land, rebecca (marks) leopold, Paul Marcus, Daryl Meador, Mary Beth Reed, Jennifer Reeves, Dave Rodriguez, Peter Rose, Lynne Sachs, Josephine Shokrian, Fern Silva & students, Jordan Stone, Mark Street, G. Anthony Svatek & Zachary Nichols, Eric Theise, Audrey Turner, Michael Wawzenek, Max Weinman & Jake Carl Magee, Timoleon Wilkins

*Catalogues from the Thomas Cole Historic Site screening and tribute on October 9, 2016, which honored and recognized Peter Hutton as a Hudson River Filmmaker, will be available at The Nightingale on Saturday, March 25.

Further information about the film:
http://erictheise.com/films/a-roll-for-peter/

 


Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, dual projection, experimental, film, geography, hand-processing, international, landscape, place, travel, Uncategorized

HAND AND MACHINE

Recent 16mm Films by Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Filmmakers in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 15th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Cinema was the first inescapably mechanical art. But in this post-mechanical age, the traditional apparatus of cinema has all to rapidly been deemed obsolete and primitive. Yet the handing over of industrial machinery to anti-industrial users represents one of the prime creative opportunities for re-appraising and re-interpreting the nature of ourselves as transformed by the age of machines.

Post mechanical age, the humanness of the machine can be made evident. Post mechanical age, machine craft is the new hand craft. The Nightingale welcomes Australian DIY cine experimentalists Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie to present this program of seven recent film works exploring the primitive apparatus of cinema and the relation between hand and machine.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1280285592006760/

Program Details:

Blue Line Chicago
2014, 10 minutes, 16mm
Architectural abstractions of the second city.

Ginza Strip
2014, 9 minutes, 16mm
The Ginza of fable and memory. This is the first film I have finished using the ‘chromaflex’ technique that we developed. This is a very much hands on color developing procedure that allows selected areas of the film to be colour positive, colour negative, or black and white.

LUX
2010, 6 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie
‘L’, ‘U’ and ‘X’ shapes in an inner urban industrial suburb captured on regular 8mm as the old ‘Lux’ stove factory undergoes conversion into more apartments than the brain can comfortably imagine. The rise and fall of industry, the rise and rise of apartments in a seething, pulsating transition.

Crossing
2016, 11 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Across the sea. Across the street. Cross processed super 8 footage of fraught neighbours Korea and Japan in grain focused enlargement.

Invention of the Wheel
2015, 14 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
On man and machine.   On the wheel upon which man turns and is turned.     On ‘homo mechanicus’ – ‘machine man’.

Pancoran
2017, 7 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Jakarta traffic moves with the harmonious chaos of complex self organising entities everywhere. Through contact printer matteing techniques this mass transport becomes denser and denser until only the fluid futility of motion/motionlessness remains.

Jakarta traffic stands as proof of the paradox of motion.

Last Train
2016, 12 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie and Richard Tuohy
Found in the (now lost) archive of Lab Laba Laba, footage from a trailer for the Indonesian film ‘Kereta Api Terakhir’ (The Last Train) melts into a soup of chemigrammed perforations.

A film made in seven cities, and none.

Etienne’s Hand
2011, 13 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy
A movement study of a restless hand. Made from one five second shot. Sound constructed from an old French folk tune played on a hand cranked music box.

Inside the Machine
2016, 12 minutes, 3 x 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Lines. Direct optical sound. An alarm from the past and the voice of the machine.

 

Richard Tuohy (b. 1969, Melbourne, Aus.) began making works on super 8 in the late nineteen eighties. After a brief hiatus from cinema (including formal study in philosophy for seven years) he returned to filmmaking in 2004. Since then he has created almost 40 films.   His films have screened at venues including the Melbourne IFF, EMAF (Osnabruck), Rotterdam IFF, New York FF, Ann Arbor and Media City and he has toured Europe, North America and Asia presenting solo programs of his work. His films are typically highly structured and and have strongly formalist concerns. He is the proprietor of the artist-run film lab nanolab – the only lab for small gauge film in Australia. His works are firmly in the ‘hand-made’ film tradition. An advocate for the possibilities of hand made cinema, Tuohy has devoted much time and effort in sharing his knowledge through workshops and classes both in his native Australia (notably through the Artist Film Workshop in Melbourne of which he is the founder and convener) and internationally. He was also a co-founder of the AIEFF experimental film festival in Melbourne.

As a young person Dianna Barrie found her way into filmmaking as a middle ground between the pursuit of abstract music and philosophy. Ever pushing the limits of the hand processing of super 8 led to the establishment of nanolab with Richard Tuohy, and into the intersection of hand making and industrial cinema technology. This exploration has spread beyond individual work to the establishment of Artist Film Workshop, where celluloid is embraced and advocated by a community of practitioners in Melbourne.

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, hand-processing, international, performance, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized, urban

Eleanore & The Timekeeper

 ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE ARTS OF LIFE

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, March 4th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

https://www.facebook.com/events/1844903545748468/

The Nightingale is proud to present a special screening of the experimental social issue documentary ELEANORE & THE TIMEKEEPER, in remembrance of Eleanore Hickman, who passed away on November 25th, 2016, at the age of 100.

This event is also a fundraiser for the Arts of Life Inc., a Chicago based organization serving disabled artists by providing studios, classes and opportunities for growth.

Thomas Comerford’s band will be performing live at the event.

$7 – $10 Suggested Donation at the Door

ELEANORE & THE TIMEKEEPER
Documentary, 76 minutes, 16mm film on video, 2010, USA
Directed by Danièle Wilmouth

The complexities of a mother’s sacrifice are discovered when Eleanore, at age 91, moves her developmentally disabled son Ronnie into a group home, after 64 years of devoted companionship and daily ritual in their modest Pennsylvania farmhouse. ELEANORE & THE TIMEKEEPER chronicles the lives of Eleanore and Ronnie Hickman, the Director’s grandmother and uncle. Shot on 16mm, the film is a quiet love story between a mother and son, which records the inevitable transformation in their relationship, and shifting definitions of home over a seven-year span.

Set in a farming and logging community in rural Pennsylvania, ELEANORE & THE TIMEKEEPER celebrates the minor spectacle of the everyday. Featuring a rich and textured musical score composed by the New York avant-garde string quartet ETHEL, the film re-frames social issues, including end of life preparations, resources for adults with disabilities, and loneliness among the elderly. Through the magnified lens of this mother and son relationship, ELEANORE & THE TIMEKEEPER celebrates life’s natural cycles of monotony and impermanence.
Website: http://www.hairlessfilms.org/eleanore.html

Awards: Nesnandy + Schwartz Feature Documentary Competition, 2nd Place, Cleveland Int. Film Festival (2011), and Best Documentary Feature, 2nd Place, Athens International Film Festival (2012).

* In English, with English subtitles for the hearing impaired.

** Please Note: The Nightingale Cinema itself is ADA accessible, however it does not have an accessible bathroom. We apologize for this inconvenience!

ABOUT ARTS OF LIFE:
The Arts of Life opened in 2000 on Chicago’s near west side and is the first Alternative Day Program in Chicago for people with disabilities that focused on artistic vocational opportunities. Today, The Arts of Life has two professional art studios that support over sixty artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities to engage in a variety of artistic mediums.
Website: http://artsoflife.org/

Guiding Values:
The Arts of Life is guided by Four Core Values, which encourage personal and professional development of its artists and Teaching Artist Residency Program participants: Inspiring Artistic Expression, Building Community, Promoting Self-Respect and Developing Independence.

THE NIGHTINGALE:
An event space featuring independant and experimental films and performances. http://nightingalecinema.org/
Their address is:
1084 N Milwaukee Ave
Chicago, IL 60642

ABOUT DANIELE WILMOUTH:
Danièle Wilmouth creates hybrids of experimental, narrative and non-fiction cinema. Her works have been exhibited at a variety of venues around the globe including; the Kunst Museum Bonn, the National Gallery of Armenia, Television Canal+(a), Argentina, PBS WTTW, Arsenal Institute for Film and Video Art, Tampere Short Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Cambridge International Film Festival, the American Dance Festival, Margaret Mead Film and Video Festival, Thessaloniki Film Festival, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the National Gallery, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. A collection of her short films was recently included in the 2016 BODY+ACT exhibition at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul, South Korea. In 2013, she was featured in Dance Films Association’s ‘Meet the Artist Series’ with a solo show at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Retrospectives of Wilmouth’s works have been held in Russia (2004, St. Petersburg International Dance Film Festival), and South Korea (2012, EXiS Film Festival, Korean Film Archives, Seoul). She currently teaches Film, Video, New Media and Performance at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Columbia College.

ABOUT THOMAS COMERFORD:

Since 2010, Comerford’s backing band has always had a number of friends and players coming and going from show to show and LP to LP, but lately has coalesced around drummer Kriss Bataille (Urge Overkill); singer-percussionist Beth Yates (Smog; The Pillowhammer); bassist Matty Cummings (Big Buildings; Magic Gloves); pedal steel guitarist Tom McGettrick (Mar Caribe); singer Crystal Hartford (Dust Bunnies; Hartford-Focht); and lead guitarist John Roeser (Innkeepers; Electric Airlines). Once this lineup fell into place in the winter of 2015, Comerford began writing a collection of new songs which the band began to track in the fall of 2015. Comerford has also been moving forward on  new material in the studio with an array of other players, including the Chicago band Panoramic and True; acclaimed upright bassist Tatsu Aoki; cellist Jamie Kempkers (Miyumi Project); drummer Seth Vanek (Roommate; Thin Hymns); engineer Nick Broste (Shape Shoppe); singer Angela James and long-time collaborators Robbie Hamilton (Robbie Skye) and Gregg Ostrom. Writes Comerford, “The idea is to keep working on the writing, revising, arranging and recording whenever opportunities present themselves, and bringing material that calls on the strengths of the particular collaborators to any given session. Not too worried about what this is yet as far as LP, EP, Boxed Set or what — just trying to stay focused on the songs and the performances.” Comerford plans to continue recording the new material through the 2017 before deciding on the release plans for it — as of February 2017, there are approximately 20-some songs in-progress.

https://thomascomerford.bandcamp.com/



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film

NEAR DEAD

Recent Films and Videos by Michael Wawzenek
Filmmaker in attendance!

Wawzenek_BreakboneFever_Still_nightingalewebsite

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, December 16th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Chicago-based filmmaker Michael Wawzenek who brings recent work on video and 16mm, including an expanded cinema 16mm projector performance.

His work investigates the precipice between life and death, translates into video the emotions of near-death experiences and examines what it means to be present.

Come see an all encompassing sunrise, a glitter glitch fist, a video re-make of a John Cage classic, and a 16mm tribute to Peter Hutton.

TONIGHT ONLY – LIVE! expanded cinema performance including sounds by M. Azzarello !

 

Program Details:

No Gloves (2016, 16mm, silent, 3 min)
In memory of Peter Hutton.

Breakbone Fever (2013, video, 7 min)
An all consuming fever takes its toll as it transfixes and grows. A recreation of my experience contracting Dengue Fever via the sights and sounds of Bali.

Blue Island  (2014, video, 7 min)
A meditation on abruptness and loss. From Blue Island Ave in Chicago to the Mississippi Swamps. In Memory of Robert Johnson and Bessie Smith.

Interleukin 1 (2016video, 3 min)
The fist is clenched, but how do you defeat an attack from within?

be (w)here (2015, 16mm on video, 6 min)
A question, a command, a caution.
In collaboration with Traci Hercher.

4’33” 4:3 (2015, video, 5 min)
After John Cage.

NEAR DEAD (2016, 16mm, ~10 min)
Live projector performance with live audio by M. Azzarello

Risings (2012, video, 20 min)
Foreigners are impressed, Thai children are impressed upon and all the while one man sits obstinately. Three unadulterated looks at the rise of globalization as seen from the streets of Thailand.

 
Total runtime ~1hr

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, video

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