ANDEAN-GARDE

Experimental Documentation
in the Andes (1963-2014)
Presented by Tiempo Libre
Curator, Daniel F. Molero in person!

adelante

Sunday, September 14th at 7:30 pm, $7-10

The NIGHTINGALE is delighted to host this slate of short films that showcase a chronological development of experiments in non-fiction from filmmakers of the Andean region. These works articulate conflicted ideas about politics, media and indigenous representation.

Revolución / Revolution
Dir. Jorge Sanjinés
9 min – Bolivia – 1963
Made out of fragments of footage filmed while making propaganda documentaries for the state lottery, and edited according to theoretical precepts of Soviet montage, Revolución could be considered Bolivia’s first experimental film. In addition to using cinema to resist dictatorships and American imperialism, Jorge Sanjinés was also one of the first to theorize the representation of non-Western subjectivities in cinema.

Vía Satélite: En vivo y en directo / Via Satellite: live
Dir. Armando Robles Godoy
10 min – Perú – 1973
Five radial narrations of the same soccer match of the Peruvian national team juxtaposed with a suggestive montage of empty streets and emblematic monuments of the country’s capital city, Lima. Robles Godoy is Peru’s first and main auteur but still undiscovered for international audiences. His films, like The Green Wall (1970), are a mysterious combination of lyrical images and a fragmented structures.

Radio Belén
Dir. Gianfranco Annichini
11 min – Perú -1983
Located in the middle of a market and a port on the Amazon jungle, a poor radio station can only broadcast through speakers. The filmmaker reduces his commentary to a few final shots, the rest is from the voice of the people.

Enterprisse
Dir. Kiro Russo
9 min – Bolivia – 2010
The man, the city, the machine. Once he’s up in the Enterprisse, he has to follow the instructions. Russo’s next short film, Juku, premiered at Sundance 2012.

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Filed under: documentary, experimental, film, international, video

SUITCASE of LOVE and SHAME

Premiere Screening  for RUN OF LIFE:
Experimental Documentary Series
Screening at Constellation
(3111 N. Western Ave.)

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Monday, September 22nd at 7:00pm,
$8 in advance / $10 at the door
Purchase tickets here

The Nightingale’s Christy LeMaster and Kartemquin Film’s Beckie Stocchetti join forces to present RUN OF LIFE, a co-curated experimental documentary and expanded media series to be held at Constellation  beginning September 22nd, 2014 and running every third Monday for nine months through May 2015.

This new series pairs a recent feature experimental documentary with a short nonfiction work in any number of mediums – performance, video short, interactive presentation, audio doc, etc. At each event, a post screening Q&A will be moderated by either a local expert engaged in the movie’s subject matter or an artist involved in the making of the work. RUN OF LIFE seeks to create a space for audiences in Chicago to explore and converse about this important and often under-recognized form of media making: “We aim to investigate experimental tactics within representations of reality; the empathetic connection that is built through sensory experience rather than factual arguments; and aesthetic shifts in documentary that come with the breakdown of the fourth wall.

PREMIERE SCREENING
SUITCASE OF LOVE AND SHAME
Dir. Jane Gillooly // 70 min // 2013 // video

Tender, erotic, and pathetic, this reconstructed narrative examines the obsession to chronicle the details of an adulterous affair. Suitcase of Love and Shame is a mesmerizing collage woven from 60 hours of reel-to-reel audiotape discovered in a suitcase purchased on eBay. Recorded in the 1960’s, a Midwestern woman and her lover become reliant on recording devises to document and memorialize their affair. The film aims at a cross-generational consciousness about exhibitionism, privacy and voyeurism. Focusing on the aural and experiential nature of the audio the imagery in the film is restrained – abstract, evocative and expectant, so that the audience will see with their ears. The listener/viewer is variously located within and outside of the events – complicit and voyeuristic. The “eavesdropping viewer” is compelled, despite feeling embarrassed and uncomfortable with the knowledge and access they have been given into the transgressions they imagine they see. Selected to screen as part of the distinguished Art of The Real series at the Film Society at Lincoln Center 2014, the film has screened internationally winning Best International Film at Images Festival in Toronto.

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Filed under: documentary, experimental, film, found footage, narrative, new media, surveillance, Uncategorized, video

DEAREST CHICAGO …

DEAREST CHICAGO, PLEASE LOVE ME!
YOURS TRULY, DETROIT
A Detroit Mini-Festival
Programmer Brandon Walley in person!

vacancy

Saturday, August 23rd at 6:00, 8:00, & 10:00 pm
$5 per screening or $10 for all

The NIGHTINGALE is delighted to host  Detroit filmmaker and programmer, Brandon Walley, to present 3 separate moving image programs that survey the cultural and physical landscape of Detroit from filmmakers that have lived there and created these works over the past decade. This mini-film-fest titled DEAREST CHICAGO, PLEASE LOVE ME! YOURS TRULY, DETROIT is a retort against the two extremes of content that usually dominate media about Detroit; that of exploitive ruin porn or the over-simplification that Detroit is quickly rising from the ashes.

 Brandon Walley is the Program Director for CORKTOWN CINEMA, the new incarnation of The BURTON THEATRE: an eclectic independent cinema that features art house, avant-garde, LGBT, foreign, local, and cult films. For the past six years he has also acted as the Regional Programmer for Media City International Film Festival in Windsor, Ontario. As a filmmaker, Brandon’s work has been received at film festivals and art exhibitions internationally.

This screening continues a dual city moving image dialogue. Last summer at Trinosophes in Detroit, The Nightingale’s Christy LeMaster presented CHICAGO LOVES DETROIT: Recent Short Film & Video Work from Chicago.

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Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, video

DEAD BIRDS by Robert Gardner

Free Memorial Screening
Presented with Documentary Educational Resources, Studio7Arts, and UIC Daley Library

Bob70percent
(photograph by Akos Ostor)

July 21st at 8:00 pm, Free

“In Dead Birds my fondest hope was that my camera be a mirror for its viewers to see themselves.” -RG

The Nightingale Cinema is honored to present a FREE screening of Dead Birds (1964) to note the recent passing of legendary nonfiction filmmaker Robert Gardner. This commemorative screening of his most influential film, Dead Birds, is a 16mm print from the University of Illinois at Chicago’s (UIC) Daley Library. The print is being made available to the public with special permission from Gardner’s family, Studio7Arts and Documentary Educational Resources of Watertown, MA (DER.org).

There is a fable told by a mountain people living in the highlands of New Guinea about a race between a snake and bird. It tells of a contest which decided whether men would be like birds and die, or be like snakes which shed their skins and have eternal life. The bird won, and from that time all men, like birds, must die. 

-from the film Dead Birds

Screen shot 2014-07-02 at 1.22.42 PM

Gardner’s own synopsis of Dead Birds

Dead Birds is a film about the Dani, a people dwelling in the Grand Valley of the Baliem high in the mountains of West Papua. When I shot the film in 1961, the Dani had a classic Neolithic culture. They were exceptional in the way they dedicated themselves to an elaborate system of ritual warfare. Neighboring groups, separated by uncultivated strips of no man’s land, engaged in frequent battles. When a warrior was killed in battle or died from a wound and even when a woman or a child lost their life in an enemy raid, the victors celebrated and the victims mourned. Because each death needed to be avenged, the balance was continually adjusted by taking life. There was no thought of wars ever ending, unless it rained or became dark. Wars were the best way they knew to keep a terrible harmony in a life that would be, without them, much drearier and unimaginable.

Dead Birds has a meaning that is both immediate and allegorical. In the Dani language the words refer to the weapons and ornaments recovered in battle. Their other more poetic meaning comes from the Dani belief that people, because they are like birds, must die.

Dead Birds was an attempt to film a people from within and to see, when the chosen fragments were assembled, if they could speak not only about the Dani but also about ourselves.

-from robertgardner.net

 

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Filed under: documentary, film, Free Screening!, Uncategorized

ELEGY TO CONNIE

Animated Documentary by Sarah Paulsen

Women in women

 Saturday, July 19th at 8:00 pm, $7-10

On February 7th, 2008, in Kirkwood, Missouri, an affluent suburb of St. Louis, Lee “Cookie” Thornton opened fire in a city meeting killing five people, among them councilwoman Connie Karr. Thorton had long been an resident of the adjacent Meacham Park, which was subsumed by Kirkwood via eminent domain for commercial development in the late 90′s. ELEGY TO CONNIE (2014) is a feature-length animated documentary that examines the complex events prior to and after the shootings as retold by a group of grassroots community builders who were close with the late councilwoman. The film was made partially in collaboration with these women and is based on their stories. Paulsen’s intricate and beautiful animations serve as a platform to explore memory, mass shootings, citizen representation, the utopian suburban dream, and healing after tragedy.

A discussion with the filmmaker will follow the screening.

ELEGY TO CONNIE is supported by a Mid America Arts Alliance Grant underwritten by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Missouri Arts Council.

Sarah Paulsen is an artist, filmmaker and community organizer whose artwork has been exhibited widely in local and national exhibitions, and whose films have been featured in the St. Louis International Film Festival, the True/False Film Festival (St. Louis, MO), and the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, among many others. A 2010 C.A.T. Institute fellow, she has also completed numerous residencies – including the Cite Internationale des Arts, Paris – and orchestrated several large-scale St. Louis-based community projects. In 2009 she founded the now-annual People’s Joy Parade on Cherokee Street, which will soon be in its sixth year. Paulsen holds a B.A. in visual art from the University of Missouri, Columbia and an M.F.A. from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Art at Washington University. She lives and works in St. Louis, where she teaches art and animation at the St. Louis Art Museum, Marian Middle School and the St. Louis Community College, Forest Park.

Programmed by Christy LeMaster

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, video

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