1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

Radius GRIDS

GRIDS Book Release and
FLEETING COMPONENTS Screening

Radius GRIDS Cover

Tuesday, July 7, 7 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

 

The Nightingale is delighted to host the release party of GRIDS, a book documenting the recent activity of Radius and the accompanying premiere of FLEETING COMPONENTS, a film by Stephanie Acosta.

Radius GRIDS was a four-part, year-long series of mobile radio broadcasts in Chicago that examined energy production, distribution, and consumption. The new GRIDS Book features on-site photographs and artist interviews with Antye Greie-Ripatti, Brett Bloom, Bonnie Fortune, Mari Keski-Korsu, Ethan Rose, Kristen Roos, and Amanda Gutiérrez. FLEETING COMPONENTS documents the GRIDS series through interviews, behind the scenes, and more.

Radius is an experimental radio broadcast platform based in Chicago, IL, USA. Radius features a new project monthly with statements by artists who use radio as a primary element in their work. Radius provides artists with live and experimental formats in radio programming. The goal is to support work that engages the tonal and public spaces of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Stephanie Acosta is a multi-disciplinary artist, curator and producer focused on experimental means to experiential goals. Acosta blends performance with practiced based research creating work at once in response to, and creator of, site and space.



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, new media, Uncategorized, video

THE ISLAND OF ST. MATTHEWS

And Other Recent Work
by Kevin Jerome Everson
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series

10551514_10204674539883096_1513699574695344939_o

 Monday, July 20,  7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

 

PROGRAM DETAILS
Fe26 (7 min, 2014)
Fe 26 is a 16mm short film by Kevin Jerome Everson that follows two gentlemen around the East Side of Cleveland, Ohio and examines the tensions between illegal work –in this case, the stealing of manhole covers and copper piping–and the basic survival tactics that exist in areas of high unemployment.

The Island of St. Matthews (64 min, 2013)
The Island of Saint Matthews is a 16mm feature film about the loss of family history in the form of heirlooms and photographs. Years ago filmmaker Kevin Jerome Everson asked his aunt about old family photographs. Her reply—that “we lost them in the flood” was the catalyst for this film, a poem and paean to the citizens of Westport, a community just west of Columbus, Mississippi, the hometown of the filmmaker’s parents. Residents, young and old, are here seen and heard reminiscing about the 1973 flood of the Tombigbee River. The film combines these interviews and conversations, filmed in front of a church, at a beauty school, on porches and backyards, with sequences of a waterskier on the Tombigbee River; a worker at the lock and dam; a young couple meeting with an insurance agent about flood insurance. The sound of a church bell—an original bronze sculpture made by the filmmaker and similar to the bell used to warn residents of an impending natural disaster—intones throughout, interspersed with a spare, elegiac score.

“With a sense of place and historical research, my films combine scripted and documentary elements with rich elements of formalism. The subject matter is the gestures or tasks caused by certain conditions in the lives of working class African Americans and other people of African descent. The conditions are usually physical, social-economic circumstances or weather. Instead of standard realism I favor a strategy that abstracts everyday actions and statements into theatrical gestures, in which archival footage is reedited or re-staged, real people perform fictional scenarios based on their own lives and historical observations intermesh with contemporary narratives. The films suggest the relentlessness of everyday life—along with its beauty—but also present oblique metaphors for art-making.” -Kevin Jerome Everson

Kevin Jerome Everson was born and raised in Mansfield, Ohio. He has a MFA from Ohio University and a BFA from the University of Akron. He is currently a Professor of Art at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Everson was awarded the prestigious 2012 Alpert Award for Film/Video and was the subject in spring 2012 of a mid-career retrospective at Visions du Reel, Nyon Switzerland, a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2011 and a retrospective at Centre Pompidou in 2009. 2014 Solo Museum exhibitions included the Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, VA; Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis and SECCA, Winston-Salem, NC. 2015. His films will be featured in the How to Remain Human exhibition at MOCA Cleveland May-Sept. 2015.

Programmed by Sally Lawton

RUN OF LIFE is a co-curated experimental documentary and expanded media series held at Constellation every third Monday of the month. The series pairs a recent feature experimental documentary with a short nonfiction work in any number of mediums – performance, video short, interactive presentation, audio doc, etc. At each event, a post screening Q&A will be moderated by either a local expert engaged in the movie’s subject matter or an artist involved in the making of the work. RUN OF LIFE seeks to join experimental and documentary media audiences while exploring experimental tactics within representations of reality; the empathetic connection that is built through sensory experience rather than factual arguments; and aesthetic shifts in documentary that come with the breakdown of the fourth wall.  RUN OF LIFE is co-curated by  Christy LeMaster, Beckie Stochetti, Robin Amer, Jillian Hansen-Lewis, Sally Lawton & Jenny Miller

 



Filed under: 16mm, documentary, experimental, narrative, Uncategorized, video

Next Page »