1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

Mary Curtis Ratcliff of Videofreex

Celebrating Videofreex’ 50th anniversary

Wednesday, July 31, 7 PM, $7-10 suggested donation – cash only

Mary Curtis Ratcliff in person!

The Nightingale is thrilled to welcome Mary Curtis Ratcliff, a founding member of the collective Videofreex, to Chicago to screen three videos made from 1969-1970, on the occasion of the group’s 50th anniversary. Mary Curtis Ratcliff—visual artist, videomaker, and political activist—participated in the creation of these tapes both on an off camera as videographer, interviewer, and interviewee. Chicago Travelogue: The Weatherman (1969), Fred Hampton: Black Panthers in Chicago (1969), and Curtis’s Abortion (1970) provide a window into the political movements and ideologies that are as important today as they were fifty years ago.

The Videofreex began in 1969 as part of the Manhattan video scene and eventually moved to upstate New York to operate a community video center and the first pirate television station in the U.S. on Maple Tree Farm in Lanesville, NY throughout the 1970s. Since 2001, the Videofreex archive has been held at the Video Data Bank at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Shortly after founding the collective, Mary Curtis Ratcliff, Parry Teasdale, and David Cort were hired by CBS to produce video footage of the emerging youth culture in Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York for a television pilot called Subject to Change. Though the program never made it to the air, the interviews that they recorded helped inspire the wave of political video documentaries now known as “Guerrilla Television.”

In an interview with the Videofreex, media artist Ralph Hocking once said that “99.99% of videotapes produced are boring as hell to 99.99% of the people who watch them.” What makes the Freex unique is that somehow so many of their tapes fit within the .01% that speak to more than just “video people.” They belong to that slim percentile of video that is essential: they capture the reality of the past and confront us with the urgency of our present.

Program Notes:

Chicago Travelogue: The Weathermen, 1969, 22:30

David Cort and Mary Curtis Radcliff interview participants after the “Days of Rage” protest organized by the Chicago-based Weathermen in October of 1969. The Videofreex question the destructive methods of the new group but allow the students to speak about the personal importance of their radical experiences.

Fred Hampton: Black Panthers in Chicago, 1969, 24:00

Mary Curtis taped Parry Teasdale and David Cort’s interview with the twenty-one year-old deputy chairman of the Black Panther Party of Illinois just months before he was murdered by the Chicago Police. Members of the Videofreex reportedly broke into CBS offices to rescue the master copy of the interview after their pilot was canceled, and screenings of the video were instrumental in organizing the campaign for a civil case against the CPD.

Curtis’s Abortion, 1970, 22:59

Fellow Videofreex Nancy Cain and Carol Vontobel speak with Mary Curtis about her experience with recently legalized abortion in New York. The participants’ thoughtful conversation turns the informational tape into an unexpectedly warm document of friendship and the women’s rights movement.

All videos will be screened digitally, and were preserved and digitized by the Video Data Bank. Programmed by Zach Vanes and Emily Eddy.



Filed under: anniversary, archival, artist in attendance, autobiography, collaboration, documentary, documentation, feminism, social justice, urban, video

Everywhere is Anywhere

Video and performance work by Sara Condo

Tuesday, December 11 at 8:00 PM, $7-10

The Nightingale is excited to welcome multidisciplinary artist Sara Condo to present a selection of her video and performance work. Condo grapples with technology, landscape and feminism, finding unexpected meanings along the highways and byways of the United States. Trust the journey.

The program includes:

Everywhere is Anywherea scrolling landscape photograph and science fiction piece mourning the death of the “American Dream.” The video follows the zen warrior path of the main character, D a queer cyberpunk goddess, who wanders across the land following the death of her estranged father, whom we will call The Wizard. D is on a spiritual journey on a search to unravel the layers of patriarchal power systems embedded in the fabric of her life. Struggling to come to grips with the loss of her ego, she completes walking meditation upon the built environment. Using the landscape as her friendly companion, D reflects on the history of each location and her place within.

The Wizarda live performance piece incorporating computer generated audio and video visuals

Wanderlust, a short experimental documentary centered around a woman who travels alone. As she travels, she contemplates notions of female hysteria, agriculture, and the dawning of the New Age.

Total screening time: approx 55 minutes



Filed under: artist in attendance, autobiography, expanded cinema, feminism, geography, landscape, music, performance, travel

Nick Alonzo presents…

Friday, May 4th at 7:30 PM
Suggested donation $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Nick Alonzo as he presents his new film

The Art of Sitting Quietly & Doing Nothing (2018)

Plot: The semi-autobiographical dramedy focuses on an impulsive young man named Carl (played by newcomer actor Alex Serrato), who begins to reflect on his past life in the city as he currently resides in the woods after being dumped by his long time girlfriend, Gloria (played by actress/filmmaker Alycya Magaña).

Director: Nick Alonzo
Cast: Alex Serrato, Alycya Magaña

Director’s Bio: Nick Alonzo is an independent, self-taught filmmaker based Chicago. In 2013, Nick directed, wrote and produced his first short film “Cut” a dark-comedy short about a man bleeding to death after accidentally cutting himself with a document file. The short – filmed on a $30 budget – was selected and screened at Columbia College for the 2013 CineYouth Film Festival.

In the summer of 2014, Nick made his first feature-length film, “Shitcago” a 65 minute black/white comedy shot entirely in the city of Chicago without any filming permits. Loosely based on personal events and people he met in his hometown in Chicago, the film follows a young loner as he wanders the city of Chicago and encounters many idiosyncratic characters. The film screened locally around the city of Chicago including at Pilsen Outpost, Comfort Film, and Transistor Chicago.

In 2017, Nick was one of the five filmmakers who participated in Destroy Your Art, a film collective where filmmakers were invited to create a short film, screen it to a live audience, and destroy it after the screening. The event was created by filmmaker Jack C. Newell and Rebecca Fons.

The event will start at 7:30pm with an introduction from the director. A Q&A session with the filmmakers and cast will follow.

Programmed by Raul Benitez.



Filed under: artist in attendance, autobiography

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