1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

REVOLUTION IN ROJAVA

US Midwest Speaking Tour 2017
Presented by Chicago Committee for
Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava

Saturday April 22nd at 4:00 pm, $5-10 suggest donation
The Nightingale (1084 N. Milwaukee)

 

Join the Chicago Committee for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava and Black Rose Chicago for a speaking event and fundraiser, to hear eyewitnesses, a YPG volunteer and experts give an up-to-date account of this vital and fascinating struggle, and have your questions about its incredibly complex circumstances answered.

Organizers:
Chicago committe for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava
https://www.facebook.com/ccskr/
Black Rose/Rosa Negra Chicago
https://www.facebook.com/blackrosechicago/

In 2017 the war with fundamentalism rages on for the Syrian Democratic Forces– northern Syria’s multiethnic armed coalition animated by the Democratic Confederalist ideology. They are currently at the threshold of the capital of al-Baghdadi’s brutal “caliphate,” Raqqa.

The northern Syrian territories, liberated from the control of both the Ba’athist regime and local jihadists, are also facing serious challenges, from the direct ground invasion and attacks of Erdoğan’s increasingly authoritarian Turkey to conflict with the Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq, all while struggling to rebuild a ravaged landscape, and still advancing an unprecedented experiment in egalitarian, participatory democracy and the elimination of ancient patriarchical norms.

At the same time, the revolutionaries’ tactical cooperation with imperialist powers, the US and Russia, as well as with the Assad regime, has sparked significant controversy in numerous circles on the left.

LIST OF SPEAKERS:
Mike Fonda
Ferit Kut
Gönül Düzer

BIOS:
Mike Fonda joined the People’s Protection Units (YPG) in the spring of 2015 where he served on the front line in Cizîrê‎ Canton, Syria as an infantryman, linguist and interrogator. Prior to joining the YGP, Mr. Fonda served in the Marine Corps for 6 years as an infantryman and linguist, deploying to Iraq twice and receiving the Purple Heart. After the Marine Corps, Mr. Fonda deployed as a Defense Contractor to Iraq and Afghanistan as a Counterintelligence Specialist. He holds a Master’s Degree in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies from the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Ferit Kut was fired from his position as a lecturer at Dicle University in February 2015 in retaliation for his advocacy for the right to native-language education. He is a PhD candidate in Pedagogy of Early Child Development at Yeditepe University and holds an MA in the same field from Dicle University. Currently, he is a board member of the Kurdish Cultural Center of Illinois.

Gönül Düzer is an activist Zaza woman who grew up in Istanbul, Turkey. She received an International Relations BA at Middle East Technical University and a Global Political Economy MA at University of Kassel. Her master’s thesis was “A Feminist Analysis of Women Workers’ Engagement in Labor Resistances: a Case Study of Istanbul’s Garment Industry”. She has been an activist on labor, gender and immigration issues in Turkey, Germany and the US. She has worked as a waiter, salesperson and labor organizer. Currently she is working as a math tutor in Chicago. She is a board member of the Kurdish Cultural Center of Illinois, and a member of Chicago Committee for Solidarity with Kurdistan and Rojava.



Filed under: anarchy, autobiography, environmental, feminism, international, social justice, Uncategorized

BAD ROMANCE

Screening and Performance

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, February 17th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Bad Romance features video works by performers and video artists that play with well-worn conventions of portraying seduction, romantic relationships, or intimate encounters in popular culture. The artists included in this screening expose the underlying mechanics of creating these seductive, and often instructive, images and scenes. They place themselves or their loved ones in front of the camera, employ illuminating voice-overs, construct awkward revelations and propose humorous antidotes to problematic romantic tropes.

Steven Summers – Chicago, IL
First Time, 6:22, 2016

Charmaine Ortiz – Carolina Beach, NC
Search: “How to draw a Woman”, Male Perspectives from YouTube result pages 1-50, 2012, 10:00

Marlo Koch – Chicago, IL
Cherry, 2014 6:27

Marlo Koch and Emerson Sigman – Chicago, IL
Wide Open, 2016, 2:39

Karin Stothart – Los Angeles, CA
Beach, 2013, 6:12
White Horse, 2012, 4:32

Casey Smallwood – Chicago, IL
Four Scenes for Mother, 2011,12:56
Smallwood Satyricon, 2013, 11:35

With Performance by Marilyn Volkman – Chicago, IL
NEO-Craft: The Easiest and Quickest Way to Gain Advantages for Prosperity, Happiness and Romantic Love

Programmed by Sara Holwerda

  • Image Credit: still from White Horse, by Karin Stothart


Filed under: artist in attendance, autobiography, feminism, narrative, performance, queer, Uncategorized, video

PETER HUTTON

Swimming in the Valley of the Moon
White Light Cinema and the Nightingale
present Three Films by Peter Hutton

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Sunday, November 20th, 7 pm, $7-10

This year, the experimental film world lost one of its keenest eyes.

Peter Hutton was an elegant ruffian, a casual radical, insistent on looking deeply, on seeing as seeking, on stilling oneself and attuning one’s sense of time to match the place. The films tonight, like most of his oeuvre, are presented in silence.

Hutton’s films find their place in the trajectory of landscape art. The twin artistic influences that dominated Hutton’s early creative life were East Asian aesthetic philosophies and his experience as a merchant marine. He remarked often that this trained him to see. It was a skill that he continued to hone over four and a half decades. He worked slowly: shooting and exploring, watching and re-watching, maintaining and honing a clarity of vision as patient as it was explorative. His films are transportive—not simply to the times and places of their making, but for our senses of seeing. This work is gorgeous—it can make celluloid fetishists of the most hardened viewer—and leaves the viewer in a state of grace, unencumbered by trying to explain its virtues. In addition to the internal composition and tonality of his images, his film are guided by his dedication to revealing stillness in motion and motion in stillness, a devotion to the poethics of sequence and a trust in both his subjects: those opposite his lens and those before the screen. We are made more patient through his films.

Tonight’s screening features a very early work, made in graduate school, which diaristically traces his life at the time and his Bay Area countercultural milieu; one of the many excellent films he made of the eponymous river over the thirty-plus years he lived in the Hudson River Valley, teaching at Bard; and a city symphony for Łódź in the midst of a transformation. We hope you can join us for this too-rare opportunity to honor the life and work of Peter Hutton. (JM)

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Filed under: 16mm, autobiography, documentary, environmental, experimental, film, travel

CANTOS

Recent 16mm Films by Margaret Rorison
Filmmaker in Attendance!

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The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, November 18th, 7 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale welcomes Margaret Rorison to present a program of short films shot on 16mm from 2012-2016. Many of these works have developed from travel and explorations through rural and urban landscapes and function as odes to memories of experience. Some films are explorations of the relationship between time and the frame, between pacing and cut and of memory … Sound is an important component to these works as well. Rorison has composed many of the soundtracks with the use of field recordings, contact mics and lucid narrations made by her grandfather. One of her most recent films, Memory of August is an ode and portrait study of her 95 year old grandmother, Margaret Bennett, the widow of Harry Bennett who has been another strong influence in Rorison’s earlier work. Prior to filmmaking, Rorison worked primarily with painting and poetry and is interested in exploring these methods of language and thought through the medium of 16mm film.

“Rorison’s works frequently wander through empty or seemingly empty spaces. Her soundtracks—often consisting largely of electronic music on the drone/noise spectrum—often create a sense of warm alienation, coloring the films’ empty landscapes. Rorison’s films abound with “negative space” compositions—shots which frame a “nothing” (for example an empty sky, a wall, water) against borders of dark (shadows, bridges, walls)… this seems to suggest something of a turning away from the world of the social and a turn towards a state of introspection. These films relish solitude and alone-ness, and even while this solitude is sometimes tinged with dread or alienation, even as the filmmaker’s visions tend toward the apocalyptic, this solitude is asserted often as a source of strength.” — Steve Polta, Artistic Director, San Francisco Cinematheque

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Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, archival, artist in attendance, autobiography, documentary, essay, experimental, film, found footage, geography, hand-processing, landscape, literature, music, performance, place, poetry, social justice, sound, surveillance, travel, Uncategorized, video