1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

BLUE FISH

blue fish Japanese Environmental
Documentary Film Festival


November- December  2017

The earth is breathing; so are humans. This fall, between October 1 and November 19, the Nightingale Cinema presents Japanese environmental documentaries to reflect upon humans’ relationship with nature. The films introduce the lives of people such as fishermen and farmers of Iwai-shima island who have been protesting against and stopping the construction of a nuclear power plant since 1982, as well as organic farmers in Fukushima who have been going through the aftermath of the 2012 nuclear power plant accident. This festival will expand the knowledge of Chicago’s urban audiences about global environmental issues and synchronize contemporary concerns about the planet through the lens of the not-so-Far East.
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Filed under: artist in attendance, Asian, documentary, environmental, international

CHICAGOLAND SHORTS: VOL. 3

Recent Moving Image Work from Chicago

GIANTS ARE SLEEPING by Amanda Gutierrez

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, July 27, 7:30 pm, $7-10

Chicagoland Shorts celebrates the new wave of independent cinema in Chicago. Vol. 3 champions work by underrepresented filmmakers and combines experimental genres into one seamless anthology.

Program Details:
ZWISCHEN
Lori Felker
ZWISCHEN (“between” in German) exists on the thin line between opposing forces. Dirt moves over light to a hand-drawn soundtrack of noise and space. 3min, 2006.

BLOKD
Martin Mulcahy
Through the voices and tools of his great grandfather, an early avant-garde filmmaker, a man explores the world as if we are living inside a movie set. 5min, 2016.

YO NO SOY ESA
Diana Delgado Pineda
On an ordinary winter afternoon, a mother does laundry and her daughter puts her clothes away. What could happen when Mom isn’t looking? 6min, 2014.

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Filed under: animation, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, documentary, experimental, new media

STOM SOGO

PS When You Thought You Are Going To Die

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Friday, June 30th, 7:30 pm, $7-10

“[A] movie’s reality should be as nasty and fucked up as possible, so we want to get fuck out of the theater and hope for something better in life…. I try not to have a message or even word in my movie. But I usually have some sick stories behind each of the movies. Those are just mental eye candy that it taste sweet first, seizure second.” – Stom Sogo

The Nightingale is pleased to present another tribute to Stom Sogo on the day before he died. A special thanks goes to Anthology Film Archives, John Klacsmann, Karen Johannesen and the following for their kind words and continued support of such an incredible, unstoppable force.

“A dynamo whose thunderous potential was cut short by his premature death, Japanese moving-image artist Stom Sogo (1975-2012) remains a romantic rebel if ever there was one. For over two decades he created a hair-raising body of aggressively beautiful films and videos. His distinctive, psychically charged work revels in optic and aural jolts just as much as it attempts a sincere connection with the viewer. While he mastered numerous approaches, his primary technique involved heavy amounts of re-photography, a process that allowed him to fashion multiple electrified layers of strobing imagery. Other pieces demonstrate his uncanny editing prowess in their startling juxtaposition of home movies with materials taken from an expansive array of unlikely sources.” – Andrew Lampert

“Total anarchy, pushing the limits, going out/within further and further, marveling at all the beauties and laughing at all the absurdities. To me this is what Stom was all about at all times.” – Raha Raissnia

“The films of Stom Sogo are incantatory and self combustible. An erratic master of low tech do-it-yourself sortilege, he puts his works through seemingly perpetual remakes.” – Mark McElhatten

“Stom was both cunning and tender, even now I use him to measure imposters. He certainly laughed at the solemnity with which the courtiers behave. He always wanted more, again.” – Albert Herter

 

Program Details:

SILVERPLAY, 2002, video, 16m
Song for TV, 2002, video, 4m
YA PRIVATE SKY, 2001, S8mm/video, 3.5m
SLOW DEATH, 2000, S8mm to video, 16m
PERIODICAL EFFECT, 2001, S8mm/video, 10m
REPEAT, 2006, video, 9.5m
PS WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, 2003, video, 14m

 

STOM SOGO was born in 1975 and moved to the United States in 1992. He graduated with a BA in art and film from Hunter College, New York, in 2000. Sogo started Open Screenings at Anthology Film Archives in 1995, inspiring a whole crew of filmmakers. His Super8 films and video works have screened at various festivals and exhibitions including Rotterdam Film Festival; the Whitney Biennale; Lincoln Center, MoMA, Light Industry, Union Docs, Chicago Filmmakers, Image Forum (Tokyo), Microscope, and many others.

 

Films/videos courtesy of Anthology Film Archives, New York

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: archival, Asian, autobiography, cityscape, documentary, experimental, film, found footage, home movies, international, landscape, music, place, re-photography, rural, sound, Super 8mm, travel, Uncategorized, urban, video

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