California Picture Book

Recent Bay Area Film and Video

Vanessa O'Neill — Suspension

Vanessa O’Neill — Suspension

Friday, April 24, 8 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL
Organized by Mary Helena Clark and tooth
Mary Helena Clark in person!

Tonight’s program consists of films and videos by Bay Area filmmakers who are involved with and in support of recent efforts to build a DIY film collective in Oakland, California. As film stocks are discontinued and artists’ spaces disappear, this effort aims to pull resources, share knowledge, make space for collaboration, and continue the rich traditional of experimental film in the Bay Area. Proceeds from tonight’s screening will go towards the lab.

John Davis — Demolished Every Second (2014, 4:25 minutes, 16mm > video)
This short work utilizes imprints from Soviet-era film leader culled from dozens of films viewed while working as an artist in residence in Dushanbe, Tajikistan in 2014. The material was largely 1980’s-era educational and propaganda films that contained a broad range of content, but had only subtle variations on more or less the same leader. Foregrounding the often ignored hand-written or machine printed artifacts found on leader, the imprints become the primary source material for a psychotronic audio/visual salvo set to an original score.

Mary Helena Clark — The Sound of Running in my Voice (2014, 5 minutes, DV)
We ape naturalism.

Michael Bucuzzo — Orion’s Belt (2011, 5 minutes, 16mm > video)
What happens to the body when it dies? What happens to the mind when it forgets the body is dead?

Zachary Epcar — A Time Shared Unlimited (2010, 10 minutes, 16mm + video)
Near-future leisure time activities and anxieties as a series of minor incidents continually interrupted, alternating between an overcrowded virtual space and a virtually abandoned city space.

Christina Kolozsvary — Nocturnes for Anatomers (2012, 6 minutes, video)
Nocturnes for Anatomers is a surrealist trip to the doctors office. A young woman suffers from mysterious illnesses caused by her neglect for her body, and her hidden desires. Diagnoses of the patient follow the charts of the cosmos, as anatomy and astrology combine.

Kent Long — The Waves (2003, 8 minutes, 16mm)
An interpretation of water’s eternal patterns of light and sound.

tooth — palms (2011, 3 minutes, super 8)
a california portrait. obscured investigation of the myth of “paradise”. palm trees are a non-native plant species to california, and their roots span equal parts as far underground as the trees tower above the earth. within this, an overlapping symbology.

Zach Iannazzi — California Picture Book (2013, 14 minutes, 16mm)

Vanessa O’Neill — Suspension (2008, 10 minutes, dual 16mm)
A toned and black-and-white reel, layered to create subtle shifts of hue and tone of abstracted seascape.



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, video

KALEIDOSCOPIC VISIONS

Films by Saul Levine
Saul Levine in person!

SaulShowStill4

Saturday, May 2, 8 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

“Saul Levine is the foremost dissenting filmmaker in America. With about 35 years of consistent production behind him, and no signs of fatigue, he can show us the shape of a life passionately and uncompromisingly devoted to filmmaking. His works are high-energy messages of friendship, records of sexual love and political activism, radiated by humor, prophetic anger, loneliness and even though rarely, representing repose.” — P. Adams Sitney (**)

“A friend of mine who worked for Yale’s AV department showed me three films that changed my life. Maya Deren’s AT LAND, CHOREOGRAPHY FOR THE CAMERA, and Viking Eggling’s SYMPHONIE DIAGONAL. From Deren’s films I saw that cinemas ability to represent figures in time and space poetically could be a paradigm of consciousness; Eggling showed me that nonfigurative shapes could evolve and change musically. I saw that I could use film to understand the world around me directly. I could also use editing to make relationships between what I was seeing in front of the camera and what was going on in my mind. I stopped making editing decisions based on story and started making them based on shape, memory and association.” -Saul Levine (*)

Program Notes:

The program title KALEIDOSCOPIC VISIONS was inspired by P. Adams Sitney’s description of Saul’s unique style of shooting and cutting as “…fused with the kalei­do­scop­ic fury of mem­o­ry…”. The program selects films by Saul Levine from 1973 to 2011. The films represent roughly three of Saul’s major formal approaches to the small gauge formats of Regular 8mm (presented as a digital transfers and a 16mm blow up) and Super 8mm (presented in Super 8mm and 16mm blow ups).

The first part of the program, ON THE SPOT (1973) and NEARSIGHT (1977-78), showcase Saul’s early rigorous in-camera work that directly responds to his subjects. Saul uses single frame shooting, repetitious movement, and variations in exposure to create “nonfigurative shapes that evolve and change musically” (*). These two films differentiate themselves from structuralist films of that era by their personal and intuitive sense. In Saul’s films we feel through his camerawork an emotionally raw response to the world that allows the viewer to “hitch a ride” into the author’s “state of mind” or “level of consciousness” (***).

The middle of the program, BOPPING THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA BLUE  and A FEW TUNES GOING OUT: GROOVE TO GROOVE, represent two films from Saul’s innovative body of Super 8mm Sound work that uses splicing to layer sounds over images from varied places or moments. Saul’s frame by frame cutting technique challenges the apparatus of the projector to represent records of “real time”. It exploits the difference in time and space of twenty six frames between the projected image and the projector’s sound head. By doing this he creates experiences of coinciding events within a single moment- multiple thoughts, memories, personal, political, local or global. Both from the series A FEW TUNES GOING OUT, the second film GROOVE TO GROOVE, shows Saul editing with this single frame and two frame method.

A comedic break, AS IS IS, is a personal and insightful portrait of the struggles of owning a pet chameleon.

The last portion of the program shows Saul’s recent experimentations of recording light with the Super 8mm camera in his working series titled: LIGHT LICKS:BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON.  JAMMING reflects on a 2004 demonstration at the National Republican Convention in New York while I WANT TO PAINT IT BLACK is “inspired by the absence of a contemporary Jewish community” (**) in Prague. Both films show the rich visual records Saul captures by spilling light into the frame beyond the camera’s aperture (see the still below)

(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, film, painting, Super 8mm, Uncategorized, video

INCALL: A Film by Brock Riebe

INCALL, the LAST call you’ll ever make!

smaller poster for online 2

Friday, April 10, 8 pm, $10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

ABOUT THE MOVIE
Kasey is down on his luck. He has no family or friends except an obnoxious, overbearing female (Beth) who always seems to show up at the wrong time (is it love?). To make ends meet, Kasey does “incall” massage from his apartment. Unfortunately, some of his married, middle aged, male clients are more interested in things OTHER than massage. Enter Marco, a sexy drifter, in the country under mysterious circumstances. After the accidental death of one of his massage clients, and through a bizarre set of circumstances, Kasey enlists the help of Marco to dispose of the body. What started as an accident soon becomes intentional as the duo lure unsuspecting men to their deaths. Its a race against time to get enough cash together to leave the country before they’re caught by the police, the landlord or the obnoxious Beth! How will this sex charged thriller end? Wouldn’t you like to know?!

INCALL: The last call you’ll ever make!

Brock Riebe is a filmmaker, actor, writer, singer/songwriter from Madison, WI. He has earned a degree in Communications from the University of WI at Madison. Incall is both his feature film acting as well as directorial debut. His goal as a filmmaker (and actor) is to create stories, characters and scenarios that deal with issues, not readily or honestly explored by mainstream media, in a fresh, innovative and entertaining way. He has lived and worked in New York City, San Francisco, Miami, and Chicago.

Learn more about the film and watch the trailer at www.incallmovie.com

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, film, queer, video

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