1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

UIC MFA 2017

Works for the Screen

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 29, 7:00 pm, Free

 

Coinciding with the 2017 MFA Thesis Exhibitions at Gallery 400, the graduating MFA students from the School of Art & Art History at University of Illinois at Chicago present a series of works for the screen at Nightingale Cinema.

Program Details:

 Caleb Foss, Dirty Data, 9 minutes
Dirty Data science fictionalizes everyday systems that place an individual in a hall of two-way mirrors, the other side of which lies an unknown spectator.  Drone video, biometrics, virtual reality, facial tracking, and a cardboard box collide in one apparatus built to dissect Caleb Foss’ head and soil the data inside.

Chris Hoag, Botany w/Canal Stamps & Artifact, 2017, 16mm, 2 mins.
Botany w/ canal stamps & artifact.

Lorenzo Gattorna, way of the gods, 2016, S8/35mm to HD, 10:05 mins.
“The mysterious stirs a reaction: an ah! This ah! is not an ah ha! or Eureka — that is, an exclamation of discovering an answer. The ah! response to mystery is more a dumbfounded recognition and appreciation of an inexplicable power or presence. For Shinto, though, the point is to accept the awesome as part of the world in which we live. To deny or try to eradicate the wondrous mystery is no less than to run away from home.”

—Shinto: The Way Home, Thomas Kasulis
Music: In a Silent Way, Miles Davis, 1969

Nellie Kluz, All The Witches, 2016, 4:05 mins.
Witches, cinematographers and other members of the crew pass a night together in the woods in Film City, Mumbai.

Zachary Hutchinson, FINAL DAYS, 2016, 3:48 mins.
“It’s basically the queer rapture.”

Chris Hoag, Heat Sink w/ Heat Sinks & Favor Spelled the British Way, 2017, 16mm, 2 mins.
Heat sink w/ heart sinks & favor spelled the British way.

Jose Luis Benavides, Lulu’s Journal, 2017, digital video, 4:32 mins.
In this video-poem the artist collects his own thoughts projected in the voice of his mother to tell parts of her story previously untold in their many recorded conversations throughout the documentary process. Through a collection of episodic journal entries and poetic investigations, the voice of the young artist Amanda Cervantes reenacts the queer, Latina youth of Lourdes or Lulu. Rather than embody her they reflect a psychic space and interiority; the private place of reflection and consciousness muted by the institution and the insidious powers of patriarchal Western culture.

Chris Hoag, Pork Operations w/ Spinning & Bauble from the Shelf by the Ficus, 2016, 16mm, 1 min.
Pork operations w/ spinning & bauble from the shelf by the Ficus.

Jose Luis Benavides, Postcard from Read, 2015, digital video, 3:08 mins.
Modeled after collectable postcards of American mental institutions and asylums, this video-poem juxtaposes the bucolic landscapes of Chicago-Read Mental Health Center with a narrated nightmare journaled by the artist’s mother, Lourdes Benavides, who spent her teenage years at the aforementioned facility. Her voice and dream reflect a psychosexual landscape and the effects of institutionalized homophobia on one woman of color. Through the broken fences and cattail reeds, this video postcard mimics a style of historic ephemera to questions the legacy of institutions and the lasting ties of queer bonding and inherited trauma.

Chris Hoag, Chase Liquid w/ Sections, esp. Section IV, 2016, 16mm, 2 mins.Chase liquid w/ sections, esp. section IV.

Jose Luis Benavides, 1972 Commission on Mental Health, 2016, digital video, 7mins.
Sourced from official transcripts of the February 15, 1972 Commission on Mental Health held at Chicago-Read Mental Health Center, the artist unearths and revives this historic text. In this all Latina-centered reenactment the artist recast this commission in a queer, brown, accented and feminist scene of resistance to highlight the lack of Latina and women’s voices on the committee and/or the witnesses stand. The reenactment simultaneously pays homage to the bravery and strength of Patricia Krochmal, a Chicago reporter who admitted herself undercover at Chicago-Read to expose conditions of abuse and neglect, spawning the hearing itself. Through these investigations into the archive the artist attempts to answer questions regarding his mother’s possible treatment and conditions at the very institution she was held only a few years later.

Zachary Hutchinson, trash kick, 2016, 15 seconds
“I kick a trash can away from my reflection in a polar fleece suit I just made and Comfort Plus heels.”

Nellie Kluz, Pairs, 2015, 5 mins.
Gesture and communication systems: work, spiritualists, and baseball.

Zachary Hutchinson, pig kick, 2016, 15 seconds
“I kick a pig away from my reflection in a polar fleece suit I just made and Comfort Plus heels.”

 Zachary Hutchinson, pig kick 2, 2016, 1 min.
“I kick a pig down five flights of stairs in a polar fleece suit I just made and Comfort Plus heels.”

Chris Hoag, 6 Drachms w/ Lens Pivoting & Dens, 2016, 16mm, 2 mins.
6 drachms w/ lens pivoting & dens.

 Zachary Hutchinson, My new outfits, 2017, 3:30 mins.
“I show my collection of polar fleece suits and my Comfort Plus heels.”

Chris Hoag, The Sherwin-Williams Harmony Collection w/ Kodak 7266 & Parakeet, 2016, 16mm, 3 mins.
The Sherwin Williams harmony collection w/ Kodak 7266 & parakeet.

 

Total Running Time: 64 minutes



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, experimental, film, video

The HARD EARTH

Filmmaker Sally Lawton in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, April 8th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Join us for this special premiere screening of The Hard Earth, a feature documentary by Sally Lawton, preceded by The 51st Star, a short 16mm film by Ian Curry.

THE HARD EARTH is an experimental documentary charting the relationship of five Ukrainians and one Ukrainian American to the 2014 revolution and preceding war.

The film is shot over the central and western regions of Ukraine, immediately post-revolution. Six figures explain their relationship to previous and furthering events in their homes and towns. First the Euromaidan protests are discussed as a singular, illuminating event. After abstracted information, stories of the annexation of Crimea, war in the East, and the disillusionment of the USSR, reveal complex portraits.The director examines interpersonal relationships and how the making of the film impacts realizations. The guides and narrations take on specific forms, showing the miniature in global news stories. The elusive categorization of Ukraine, free and yet oppressed is framed by the difficulty and ease of documentation.

SALLY LAWTON is making film and video work in Chicago and grew up in Detroit. She owns Sincerely Productions which makes commercials for local businesses. She has done curatorial work with experimental film and documentary in Chicago. Her academic background is in film and nonprofit studies, graduating from DePaul University in 2013. Her interest in this project began after her friend, Maya Demianczuk, returned from the Euromaidan. Sally began filming interviews primarily for a public archiving project Maya began, which lead to traveling to Ukraine in summer 2015 and collecting material for the film.

IAN CURRY’s moving image work takes inspiration from the many genres within the 16mm format such as: silent, educational, experimental, avant garde, ethnographic, and documentary films. He combines formal strategies gleaned from celluloid’s history through experimentation to produce stunning imagery that embraces the feeling of a memory or reflection. His films use contact printing, multiple exposures, and in-camera editing or feature on the fly remixing with multiple projectors driving the audience down expanded cinema alley. Characterized by unique moments or observations, rushing energies of light, and striking rhythmic edits; concepts of film and performance are married into a raw celluloid trip with 16mm prints, projectors, and double system soundscapes.

 



Filed under: artist in attendance, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, geography, international, narrative, place, social justice, travel, video

A ROLL FOR PETER

A Tribute Screening for Peter Hutton
Contributors, Michael Wawzenek and           Paul Marcus, in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Saturday, March 25th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

The Nightingale is pleased to present A ROLL FOR PETER, a multi-maker, 16mm, black & white tribute to filmmaker Peter Hutton (1944-2016).

Participating filmmakers, Michael Wawzenek and Paul Marcus, in attendance!

Many filmmakers and artists were deeply affected by Peter’s death in June 2016. Twenty-plus former students, colleagues, and admirers of Peter Hutton answered an invitation to shoot A ROLL FOR PETER. The parameters were simple: shoot a single 100 foot roll of 16mm black and white reversal film. The rolls are strung together with black leader separating the rolls, as Peter often separated the single shots in his films. Organized and assembled by Jennifer Reeves and Mark Street, and set on tour thanks to the energies of Eric Theise, this series of pieces speaks to Peter’s strong contemplative aesthetic ethos. Each filmmaker has 2 minutes and 47 seconds of screen time to commune with Peter’s memory, and the collected rolls become more than the sum of their parts.

The organizers write, “Peter Hutton’s contemplative, visually arresting landscape and urban films invite us to take our time within silent cinematic tableaux of place, so that we may discover the beauty of overlooked moments. His carefully composed long-duration shots, whether of city, nature, sea or factory, remind us of the wonder we can discover in the familiar. As we observe with patience, humility and vulnerability, Peter’s work offers us a sanctuary from the frantic, goal oriented state of current visual culture.”

“To me one of the most attractive things about cinema is the fact that you can evoke a sense of mystery, of wonder or curiosity in an environment, a landscape, a room, anyplace, by suspending time. So much of the information that we perceive in film is explained or presented to us in such a way that we can’t help but rationalize it. Once someone leaves us to our own interpretive devices, we can feel a great reprieve and the opportunity to actually give something to the work. It’s like sitting and looking at a painting, at first it might not grab you, but the longer you look at it, the more things reveal themselves.” (Peter Hutton in A Critical Cinema 3, interview with Scott MacDonald)

Program Details:

A Roll for Peter (2016)
16mm and 16mm x 2, black & white, silent, 60 minutes

Participating Filmmakers:
Dominic Angerame, Roddy Bogawa, Cassandra Bull, Jacob Burckhardt, Jesse Cain, David Gatten, Richard Max Gavrich, George Griffin, Eve Heller, Mott Hupfel, Nikolas Jaeger, Amanda Katz & Josh Lewis, Theodore Rex King, Robbie Land, rebecca (marks) leopold, Paul Marcus, Daryl Meador, Mary Beth Reed, Jennifer Reeves, Dave Rodriguez, Peter Rose, Lynne Sachs, Josephine Shokrian, Fern Silva & students, Jordan Stone, Mark Street, G. Anthony Svatek & Zachary Nichols, Eric Theise, Audrey Turner, Michael Wawzenek, Max Weinman & Jake Carl Magee, Timoleon Wilkins

*Catalogues from the Thomas Cole Historic Site screening and tribute on October 9, 2016, which honored and recognized Peter Hutton as a Hudson River Filmmaker, will be available at The Nightingale on Saturday, March 25.

Further information about the film:
http://erictheise.com/films/a-roll-for-peter/

 


Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, artist in attendance, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, dual projection, experimental, film, geography, hand-processing, international, landscape, place, travel, Uncategorized

Next Page »