1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

INNER DISTANCES

Programmer, Amanda VanValkenburg,
in Attendance

Friday, September 8 at 8 PM, $7-10

Inner Distances, a screening curated by Amanda VanValkenburg, examines how technology affects sense of place and sense of self. Relationships to location becomes abstracted through the mediation of devices. The internet creates familiar landing sites, social media pages become extensions of identity, and google maps can be used to explore topographically accurate recreations of locations around the world. Sense of place is an abstraction of location navigated by information, senses, and physical stimulus. This screening is focused on repurposing devices or software to explore concepts of space and technology, or other strategies that investigate relationships between the virtual and the physical.

This project was developed with support from High Concept Labs.

Program Details:

Parastoo Anoushahpour, Ryan Ferko and Faraz Anoushahpour
Bunte Kuh
(5 min)
Through a flood of images and impressions, a narrator attempts to recall a family holiday. Produced in Berlin and Toronto, Bunte Kuh combines a found postcard, family photo album, and original footage to weave together the temporal realities of two separate vacations.

Johann Lurf
Embargo
(10 minutes)
The oscillating sound of video games, glass facades, barbed wire and high walls that block our view of what goes on behind them. Someone has something to hide here. In EMBARGO we peer over the barriers, past red eyes and CCTV cameras and into state-of-the-art premises of arms and drone manufacturers. The elaborate recording techniques create quite a distinctive spatiality, drifting between distance and closeness. A science-fiction nightmare, dangerously close to reality.

Orr Menirom
Clinton and Sanders Looking at the World and Naming Things for the First Time
(11 minutes)
This short video is based on a CNN debate which took place in April 2016 between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The visuals of the debate have been removed and replaced with a series of dreamlike images. Paired with this alternative footage, the politicians’ words narrate a new and personal story, revealing the subconscious of the politicians. The debate turns into a Rorschach test onto which viewers can project their own thoughts and associations.

Brock Neilson
Reunion 1
(7 minutes)
The artist re-enters a space from their childhood as an adult, freely exploring and reimagining the tone of the space through the lens of an iphone and a year-long process of editing sound and footage on an apple desktop computer.

Daniel Spangler
The Age of Branches
(8 minutes)
A dramatic retelling of systemic collapse, unfolding on the scale of nanoseconds, The Age of Branches examines the American power infrastructure during a crisis of continental proportions, reframing the jargon of its technical port-mortem as mythic language.

Amanda VanValkenburg
Unnatural Disasters
(10 minutes)
A 3D sculpted environment full of architecture caught in the act of critical change. Simulated disasters oscillate on the border between realism and complete artifice with a slow observation of decay. Basing each vignette off of existing locations, the 3D re-enactment allows an destructive intervention that is ephemeral by design.

Calum Walter
Terrestrial
(10 minutes)
The observations of an object in motion: A mobile device captures the trajectories of objects liberated from and bound to land, against a backdrop of uniquely human dissonance. Terrestrial attempts to articulate a desire to transcend bodily limits with electronics and machines, while acknowledging an unavoidable level of dysfunction. The film was inspired by an incident in 2014 where a Blue Line train in Chicago failed to stop at its final destination, the O’Hare airport, and eventually came to a stop halfway up the escalator at the airport’s entrance. Terrestrial re- imagines this accident as an earthbound machine’s failed takeoff.

Blake Williams
Red Capriccio
(7 minutes) 
An anaglyph 3D found footage film about machines and landscape that interlaces motion with stasis, crescendos with glissandos, and reds with blues. Its triangular structure juxtaposes scenes of a parked Chevy Caprice police vehicle, a cruise along Montréal’s infamous Turcot Interchange, and a visit to a basement rave room.

About the Artists:

Parastoo Anoushahpour, Faraz Anoushahpour, and Ryan Ferko have worked in collaboration since 2013. Using various performative structures to work in relation to speci c sites, their projects explore collabora- tion as a way to upset the authority of a singular narrator or position. Currently based in Toronto, recent lm and installation work has been shown at Projections (New York Film Festival), Wavelengths (Toronto Inter- national Film Festival), International Film Festival Rotterdam, Internationale Kurz lmtage Oberhausen (Ger- many), Portland International Film Festival, Media City Festival (Windsor/Detroit), Experimenta (Bangalore), Crossroads Festival (San Francisco), and ZK/U Centre for Art & Urbanistics (Berlin), Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography (Toronto), SPACES Art Centre (Cleveland), and Trinity Square Video (Toronto).

Johann Lurf is an artist and filmmaker, using the moving image to analyse and restructure space and film. His practice involves observational and documentary filmmaking especially in the field of structural film, as well as an approach to found footage which is strongly oriented on filmic language itself. Born in 1982 in Vienna Lurf has studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and the Slade School of Art in London. He graduated from Harun Farocki’s film class in 2009. He received the State Grant of Austria for Video and Media Art and participated in the Artist-in- Residence Programs at the MAK Center for Arts and Architecture in Los Angeles 2011, the SAIC in Chicago 2015 and in Tokyo 2016. His work has been shown internationally and recognized with awards in numerous exhibitions and festivals.

Orr Menirom’s work explores the border between what is real and what is barely or beyond perceptible. Mixing appropriated materials with self shot footage, she cuts and pastes sentences and uses other people’s words to question language as the border between the political and the existential. Originally from Tel Aviv, Israel, Menirom is an alumna of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (2016), the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA, 2014), Kuvataideakatemia (exchange student, 2009) and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (BFA, 2010). She was a 2016-17 research fellow at the Jan Van Eyck Academy (NL). Solo and two person shows include The Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, Des Moines Art Center (IA), Aspect/Ratio Gallery (IL) and Fafa Gallery (Helsinki, Finland). Screenings include the International Film Festival Rotterdam (NL), Expo Chicago (IL) and Chicago Underground Film Festival (IL). Awards include a New Artist Society Merit Scholarship, Toni and Tim Urban Artist-in-Residence and an Anna Louise Raymond Fellowship.

Brock Neilson grew up in a rural part of Idaho and is currently based in Salt Lake City. They typically work in abstract sound, costume-making, drag performance and electronic music.

Based in a diverse and expanding multimedia practice, Pennsylvania-born artist, musician, and writer Daniel Spangler creates speculative, narrative-based works that examine the construction of personal and mass-media languages used by humans to reconcile themselves with the complexities of the natural world–a process by which storytelling arises as an emergent phenomena. Formerly a visual effects artist, he attended the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, and later received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was awarded the New Artists Society Fellowship. His work has been exhibited and screened at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Anthology Film Archives in New York, the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago, and many others.

Amanda VanValkenburg uses her background in painting and drawing to inform her work with 3D software to make videos that play in the uncanny valley. Her work has been shown in the MCA, Mana Contemporary, the Gene Siskel, the Elmhurst Museum, the Nightingale, 6018 North Gallery, Links Hall, LeRoy Neiman Center Gallery, and the Chicago Digital Media Festival. She was recently a High Concept Labs sponsored artist and an Oxbow Artist in Residence.

Calum Walter is an artist focusing on sound and the moving image. He has a BFA from the University of Colorado where he studied filmmaking with an emphasis on sound, and later received a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work has screened at places including the New York Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Rencontres Internationales Paris/Berlin, Hong Kong Arts Centre, Slamdance, FIC Valdivia, and Ann Arbor Film Festival. He lives in Chicago and teaches in the department of Radio, Television and Film at Northwestern University.

Blake Williams was in born in Houston, Texas and currently lives, works, and writes in Toronto, Canada, where he is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute. His stereoscopic videos propose mutant and imaginary histories of representational media by exploring the buried or ‘useless’ functionalities of visual technologies. His work has screened at venues such as the Toronto International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Locarno Festival, and International Short Film Festival of Oberhausen.



Filed under: animation, architecture, artist in attendance, collaboration, experimental, geography, new media, Uncategorized

CHICAGOLAND SHORTS: VOL. 3

Recent Moving Image Work from Chicago

GIANTS ARE SLEEPING by Amanda Gutierrez

The Nightingale, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Thursday, July 27, 7:30 pm, $7-10

Chicagoland Shorts celebrates the new wave of independent cinema in Chicago. Vol. 3 champions work by underrepresented filmmakers and combines experimental genres into one seamless anthology.

Program Details:
ZWISCHEN
Lori Felker
ZWISCHEN (“between” in German) exists on the thin line between opposing forces. Dirt moves over light to a hand-drawn soundtrack of noise and space. 3min, 2006.

BLOKD
Martin Mulcahy
Through the voices and tools of his great grandfather, an early avant-garde filmmaker, a man explores the world as if we are living inside a movie set. 5min, 2016.

YO NO SOY ESA
Diana Delgado Pineda
On an ordinary winter afternoon, a mother does laundry and her daughter puts her clothes away. What could happen when Mom isn’t looking? 6min, 2014.

(more…)



Filed under: animation, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, documentary, experimental, new media

HAND AND MACHINE

Recent 16mm Films by Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Filmmakers in attendance!

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee
Wednesday, March 15th, 7:00 pm, $7-10

Cinema was the first inescapably mechanical art. But in this post-mechanical age, the traditional apparatus of cinema has all to rapidly been deemed obsolete and primitive. Yet the handing over of industrial machinery to anti-industrial users represents one of the prime creative opportunities for re-appraising and re-interpreting the nature of ourselves as transformed by the age of machines.

Post mechanical age, the humanness of the machine can be made evident. Post mechanical age, machine craft is the new hand craft. The Nightingale welcomes Australian DIY cine experimentalists Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie to present this program of seven recent film works exploring the primitive apparatus of cinema and the relation between hand and machine.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1280285592006760/

Program Details:

Blue Line Chicago
2014, 10 minutes, 16mm
Architectural abstractions of the second city.

Ginza Strip
2014, 9 minutes, 16mm
The Ginza of fable and memory. This is the first film I have finished using the ‘chromaflex’ technique that we developed. This is a very much hands on color developing procedure that allows selected areas of the film to be colour positive, colour negative, or black and white.

LUX
2010, 6 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie
‘L’, ‘U’ and ‘X’ shapes in an inner urban industrial suburb captured on regular 8mm as the old ‘Lux’ stove factory undergoes conversion into more apartments than the brain can comfortably imagine. The rise and fall of industry, the rise and rise of apartments in a seething, pulsating transition.

Crossing
2016, 11 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Across the sea. Across the street. Cross processed super 8 footage of fraught neighbours Korea and Japan in grain focused enlargement.

Invention of the Wheel
2015, 14 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
On man and machine.   On the wheel upon which man turns and is turned.     On ‘homo mechanicus’ – ‘machine man’.

Pancoran
2017, 7 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Jakarta traffic moves with the harmonious chaos of complex self organising entities everywhere. Through contact printer matteing techniques this mass transport becomes denser and denser until only the fluid futility of motion/motionlessness remains.

Jakarta traffic stands as proof of the paradox of motion.

Last Train
2016, 12 minutes, 16mm, Dianna Barrie and Richard Tuohy
Found in the (now lost) archive of Lab Laba Laba, footage from a trailer for the Indonesian film ‘Kereta Api Terakhir’ (The Last Train) melts into a soup of chemigrammed perforations.

A film made in seven cities, and none.

Etienne’s Hand
2011, 13 minutes, 16mm, Richard Tuohy
A movement study of a restless hand. Made from one five second shot. Sound constructed from an old French folk tune played on a hand cranked music box.

Inside the Machine
2016, 12 minutes, 3 x 16mm, Richard Tuohy and Dianna Barrie
Lines. Direct optical sound. An alarm from the past and the voice of the machine.

 

Richard Tuohy (b. 1969, Melbourne, Aus.) began making works on super 8 in the late nineteen eighties. After a brief hiatus from cinema (including formal study in philosophy for seven years) he returned to filmmaking in 2004. Since then he has created almost 40 films.   His films have screened at venues including the Melbourne IFF, EMAF (Osnabruck), Rotterdam IFF, New York FF, Ann Arbor and Media City and he has toured Europe, North America and Asia presenting solo programs of his work. His films are typically highly structured and and have strongly formalist concerns. He is the proprietor of the artist-run film lab nanolab – the only lab for small gauge film in Australia. His works are firmly in the ‘hand-made’ film tradition. An advocate for the possibilities of hand made cinema, Tuohy has devoted much time and effort in sharing his knowledge through workshops and classes both in his native Australia (notably through the Artist Film Workshop in Melbourne of which he is the founder and convener) and internationally. He was also a co-founder of the AIEFF experimental film festival in Melbourne.

As a young person Dianna Barrie found her way into filmmaking as a middle ground between the pursuit of abstract music and philosophy. Ever pushing the limits of the hand processing of super 8 led to the establishment of nanolab with Richard Tuohy, and into the intersection of hand making and industrial cinema technology. This exploration has spread beyond individual work to the establishment of Artist Film Workshop, where celluloid is embraced and advocated by a community of practitioners in Melbourne.

 

Programmed by Lorenzo Gattorna



Filed under: 16mm, 8mm, architecture, archival, artist in attendance, Asian, cityscape, collaboration, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, film, found footage, hand-processing, international, performance, Super 8mm, travel, triple projection, Uncategorized, urban