1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

Duke & Battersby

short works by Emily Vey Duke & Cooper Battersby

Friday, November 22nd, 7 PM, $7-$10

(2001-2019, Canada / United States, digital, 52 min + discussion)

Cooper Battersby (b. 1971, Penticton British Columbia, Canada) and Emily Vey Duke (b. 1972, Halifax Nova Scotia, Canada) have been working collaboratively since June 1994. They work in printed matter, installation, new media, curation and sound, but their primary practice is in single-channel video. Between discussions of life, death, and sexuality, Duke & Battersby craft a simultaneously cute, violent, and emotive universe, starting a poetic and psychoanalytic dialog between humans, animals, plants, and their camera.

Bad Ideas for Paradise
(2001, 20 min)

Lesser Apes
(2011, 12 min)

Here is Everything
(2013, 14 min)

Civil Twilight at the Vernal Equinox
(2019, 6 min, Work in Progress)

This program is produced in partnership with The Block Museum.



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, environmental, essay, experimental, feminism, new media

FLEEGIX

Friday, August 2nd, 7 PM, $5-10 suggested donation – cash only

FLEEGIX is a science-fiction film set on Earth,  although some of the population have become convinced that they are in fact living on the planet Mars.

The film investigates the nature of belief systems which overlap, co-exist, and create conflict in any human society.
Its subject is the nature of reality. It takes place in a recognizeable world of parks, parking lots, gas stations and video stores, which makes the episodes stranger and more tangible. It does not create a fantasy world: the extraordinary is mapped onto a recognizable landscape.
The film is inspired by and loosely adapted from on a Young Adult novel by Daniel Pinkwater, Alan Mendelsohn, the Boy From Mars, in which alienated high school students Leonard and Alan escape boredom through developing telepathic powers and learn to travel to other dimensions overlapping their own. I have received permission from the author to make a film that is a creative interpretation of his book.

The film was shot on color 16mm and includes both live action, stop motion and hand drawn animated segments. The appearance of animation in the narrative is to illustrate propaganda, such as depictions of newsworthy events on Mars.
This film is an organism that grows and continues to develop a web of connected motifs and ideas.
FLEEGIX is constructed through the accumulation of short scenes that echo and lead into each other, making connections across time and space. It is a a “Situationist Fairy story” …, a non-linear narrative that is based around a series of surprising images, that nonetheless describes an entire world.

At the heart of the film is the question as to how Fleegix (a beverage enjoyed by Martians) is manufactured.The film details further conflict among New York “Potato-Eyed” Martians who express themselves in animated movement, and the Hand Shadow Punks of Baltimore, who represent a pre-cinematic faction.
The film proposes various absurd answers to this question, and the dispute takes on symbolic and mythological proportions.

Programmed by Nabil 


Filed under: 16mm, anarchy, animation, artist in attendance, environmental, expanded cinema, experimental, film, music, new media

PAIN IS JUST A PROGRAM,

BUT SO IS PHOTOSHOP

Jacob Ciocci presents: “April fools! Pain is just a Program made by your Mind: the video Program. New Videos made by your Mind by Jacob Ciocci” presented on April Fools Day, the day that was made by your mind

Monday, April 1 at 8 PM (doors 7:30), $0-7-10

The Nightingale is fool-less-ly excited to bring relatively new Chicagoan Jacob Ciocci and some of his (relatively and, as they say, brand) new work to the big screen. For a legally voting or vaping aged human’s life, Ciocci has produced an immense body of work in video, performance, animation, sound, netart, sculpture, drawing, publication, painting and whatever else there is that has exhibited in museums and punk houses alike, populated by an idiosyncratic cast of characters from the far edges of junk culture, the bleating hearts of pop op and whatever a mind is. Formally diffuse, but with key ties (ecstatic color and movement, 31st century collage, heavy/heady/leafy sentiments), his work continues to grow and deepen, responsive both to Culture and culture, never shifting away from the lens (like a camera, like a projector) of his own subjectivity.

If you didn’t zone deep to paperrad.org or (f/b)reakdance at an Extreme Animals show, did you really vote against Romney?

Or, as a recent excursion to Planet Fitness for Jacob yielded:

It’s April fools but who is the biggest fool? An internet troll, a gremlin, the joker, or me, who still believes in these fantastic creatures ?

On April 1st Watch out for internet trolls gremlins and jokers and real trolls and fake jokers aka jokesters.

It’s always April fools day with all these trolls gremlins and jokers all over the place

On the internet it’s always April fools day so don’t get tricked by a troll gremlin or joker when you check your email

On the internet it’s always April fools day. Never trust a troll, a gremlin or a joker and definitely never ever trust yourself

If a troll asks for your password on April fools day give it to them it’s a reverse prank

Listen to the fools, the trolls and the jokesters for they have the mystical passwords and might steal your bank info

Can you handle life inside The mind of a fool, just for one day? What if that fool also happened to be a troll mixed with a gremlin and stole your password?

Jacob Ciocci (b. 1977, Lexington, KY) is a multimedia artist and musician. Ciocci was a member of the influential art collective Paper Rad whose work in the field of net.art––one of contemporary arts’ recent movements of the true avant-garde––helped ignite the genre, and is considered formative to a generation of younger artists whose works deals with the digital. He is also a co-founder of the long running electronic music and performance group, Extreme Animals.In his videos, installations and performances, the cultural symbols and technological tools of our time, both the popular and the obscure confront one another and the viewer on a visceral, emotional, and experiential level.

Ciocci has had recent solo exhibitions with Interstate Projects, New York; And/Or Gallery, Los Angeles and Prosjektrom Normanns, Norway. He has exhibited and performed his work at a range of venues, including MOMA, the New Museum, and the Tate Britain. Recent activities include a series of cell-phone charging sculptures for the Difference Engine group exhibition at Lisson Gallery (summer 2018) and “Appetite For Destruction” a short essay about the online “Finger Family Video” phenomenon. Ciocci is also the second Google Image result for the phrase “making friends with computers”.

programmed by Jesse Malmed



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, experimental, found footage, new media, Uncategorized, video

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