EYEWORKS 2014

Experimental Animation Festival

PageImage-513947-4863611-eyeworks_face

Friday & Saturday, November 14-15th
Doors open one half hour before every screening

Mark your calendars! The 2014 Eyeworks Festival, now in its 5th year,  returns to The Nightingale. The kickoff program will be at the Museum of Contemporary Art on Nov. 11, with additional screenings, including a program with  festival guest Caleb Wood, at the Nightingale on Nov. 14-15.

Nightingale Program 1
Friday, November 14, 2014
7:00 PM, admission $10Festival guest Caleb Wood in person! Caleb will be showing a program of his animated short films, as well as a selection of films that have inspired his work.
Wood’s animations have been screened at top animation festivals internationally, and his work has been featured on Adult Swim. He was selected for the prestigious Animation Artist in Residency Tokyo program in 2013, where he made his film “Goodbye Rabbit Hop Hop.” He will introduce the program of his work, which will include around 20 short pieces, and participate in an audience Q&A after the screening.

 

Nightingale Program 2
Saturday, November 15, 2014
5:00 PM, admission $10
Robert Breer, 69, 1968
Doris Chase, Circles I, 1971
Larry Cuba, 3/78, 1978
Chris Sullivan, The Beholder, 1983
Nicole Hewitt, In/Dividu, 1998
Neil Taylor, Copy Copy, 1999
Sandra Desmazieres, Sans Queue Ni Tete, 2001
Laszlo Csaki, Days That Were Filled With Sense by Fear, 2002-03
Daniel Barrow, Advanced Search Terms, 2012-13
Sarina Nihei, Trifling Habits, 2013
Karolina Glusiec, Velocity, 2013
Nick Butcher, Sidewalk, 2014
Allison Schulnik, Eager, 2014


Nightingale Program 3
Saturday, November 15, 2014
8:00 PM, admission $10Note: Program 3 is a modified version of the MCA program, screening Tuesday Nov. 11.
John Whitney Jr, Terminal Self, 1971
Florence Miailhe, Hammam, 1992
Georges Schwizgebel, Jeu, 2006
Hoji Tsuchiya, Black Long Skirt, 2010
Leslie Baum and Frederick Wells, Megillat Breakdown, 2013
Eri Kawaguchi, Flower and Steam, 2013
Joung Yumi, Love Games, 2013
Johan Rijpma, Descent, 2014
Joshua Mosley, Jeu de Paume, 2014
Yoriko Mizushiri, Snow Hut, 2014
Jake Fried, Headspace, 2014
Zeitguised, Birds, 2014
All programs preceded by works by Neil Taylor: “Roll Film” and “Short Lives”

Check here for more exciting EYEWORKS news!



Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, experimental, film, international, video

SUGGESTIVE GESTURES

David Finkelstein in person!
Shorts by Thorne Brandt and Jesse Malmed!

glorious_gestures

Monday, October 27th at 7:00 pm, $7-10

A poet’s journey though corridors of liquid geometry where words float and echoes are visual; where portals open onto morphing gardens with unlimited horizons.

—Mike Kuchar

The Nightingale is proud to host the Chicago premiere of David Finkelstein’s debut feature, Suggestive Gestures. An oneiric, surprising odyssey through seductive, hyperreal and overwhelming spaces that float somewhere between the screen and your body. Piloted by expansive and elastic improvisation, the work unfolds into continually unpredictable and astonishing new territories.

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Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, experimental, video

ELEGY TO CONNIE

Animated Documentary by Sarah Paulsen

Women in women

 Saturday, July 19th at 8:00 pm, $7-10

On February 7th, 2008, in Kirkwood, Missouri, an affluent suburb of St. Louis, Lee “Cookie” Thornton opened fire in a city meeting killing five people, among them councilwoman Connie Karr. Thorton had long been an resident of the adjacent Meacham Park, which was subsumed by Kirkwood via eminent domain for commercial development in the late 90’s. ELEGY TO CONNIE (2014) is a feature-length animated documentary that examines the complex events prior to and after the shootings as retold by a group of grassroots community builders who were close with the late councilwoman. The film was made partially in collaboration with these women and is based on their stories. Paulsen’s intricate and beautiful animations serve as a platform to explore memory, mass shootings, citizen representation, the utopian suburban dream, and healing after tragedy.

A discussion with the filmmaker will follow the screening.

ELEGY TO CONNIE is supported by a Mid America Arts Alliance Grant underwritten by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Missouri Arts Council.

Sarah Paulsen is an artist, filmmaker and community organizer whose artwork has been exhibited widely in local and national exhibitions, and whose films have been featured in the St. Louis International Film Festival, the True/False Film Festival (St. Louis, MO), and the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, among many others. A 2010 C.A.T. Institute fellow, she has also completed numerous residencies – including the Cite Internationale des Arts, Paris – and orchestrated several large-scale St. Louis-based community projects. In 2009 she founded the now-annual People’s Joy Parade on Cherokee Street, which will soon be in its sixth year. Paulsen holds a B.A. in visual art from the University of Missouri, Columbia and an M.F.A. from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Art at Washington University. She lives and works in St. Louis, where she teaches art and animation at the St. Louis Art Museum, Marian Middle School and the St. Louis Community College, Forest Park.

Programmed by Christy LeMaster

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, video

AVANT-GARDE AS KITSCH

YouTube and Avant-Garde Cinema
A Talk by Colin Beckett

technoviking

 Saturday, June 28th at 8:00 pm, $7-10

The vernacular video forms that have emerged on YouTube and other online services over the last eight years frequently bear striking resemblance to the non-narrative strategies that have constituted the history of avant-garde film and video.

While many critics and scholars have noted the resemblance, the implications for the cinematic avant-garde have gone largely unconsidered. As non-narrative internet videos begin to eclipse commercial cinema in viewership and cultural influence, the rise of YouTube might be seen, from one angle, as a covert triumph for the avant-garde. But if this is the case, these developments also initiate a crisis for experimental cinema, liquidating the relations that have structured it and calling into questions claims made on the behalf of its ideological force.

This lecture, illustrated with internet videos, asks how the new preeminence of non-narrative and fragmentary video forms recasts the history of avant-garde film and video and what sort of space it leaves for contemporary avant-garde moving image practice–particularly one geared toward an emancipatory politics. (CB)

Colin Beckett is a writer based in Brooklyn New York. His work has appeared in BOMBblog,The Brooklyn Rail, Cineaste, Moving Image Source, Idiom Magazine, The L Magazine, and wuxia.

Programmed by Christy LeMaster

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, experimental, film, found footage, lecture, new media, Uncategorized, video

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