1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

A BODY WITHOUT ORGANS

RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series

bodywoorgans

Monday, October 19th, 7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

A BODY WITHOUT ORGANS by Stephen Graves
(2012, HD Video, 82 min)

A BODY WITHOUT ORGANS was shot intimately with my father and mother over a one and a half year period at their home in Florida. It is a portrait of their lives in the present, along a continuous present marked by frequent incursions into various pasts, real and imagined. My father has no colon. He is a narcoleptic. His friends are all dead. His life is dreamt. In the house there is my mother. There are the cats. And then there is a body without organs. -SG

Preceded by
RESTLESS LEG SAGA by Shana Moulton
(2012, HD video, 7:14)

In this edition of Moulton’s narrative series, the artist’s character Cynthia suffers from Restless Leg Syndrome, and seeks relief in pharmaceutical ads on TV and in health magazines. In a domestic world enlivened with animated dance and mystic poetry (written and read by poet John Coletti), Cynthia finds relief in the healing mineral AION A, discovered by Swiss artist Emma Kunz.

 

RUN OF LIFE is a collectively curated experimental documentary and expanded media series held at Constellation every third Monday of the month. The series pairs a recent feature experimental documentary with a short nonfiction work in any number of mediums – performance, video short, interactive presentation, audio doc, etc. At each event, a post screening Q&A will be moderated by either a local expert engaged in the movie’s subject matter or an artist involved in the making of the work. RUN OF LIFE seeks to join experimental and documentary media audiences while exploring emerging tactics within representations of reality; the empathetic connection that is built through sensory experience rather than factual arguments; and aesthetic shifts in documentary that come with the breakdown of the fourth wall.  RUN OF LIFE is organized by Robin Amer, Jillian Hansen-Lewis, Sally Lawton, Christy LeMaster, Jenny Miller & Beckie Stocchetti and presented by Constellation Chicago in collaboration with the Nightingale Cinema.

Programmed by Jenny Miller



Filed under: animation, documentary, experimental, new media, video

E.S.P TV

Live Taping at The Nightingale

esptv

Saturday, April 25, 8 pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

E.S.P. TV is a live TV studio that hybridizes technologies old and new to realize synthetic environments for performance while also exposing the process of production.

The COAST TO COAST  tour will travel to 12 locations across the US in April 2015. For this project, a large ENG news van has been outfitted as a modified mobile broadcast unit. The van houses analog and digital broadcast consoles with additional internet and web ready capabilities.

The tour encompasses live taping events, exhibitions, screenings, and artists talks. Fifty plus artists  participating in this televisual project will create new works with a focus on transmission and simulation. In an effort to better document the broader spectrum of cultural activity, E.S.P TV teams up with  museums, galleries, project spaces, and DIY venues.  In addition to live performances, E.S.P TV will present a traveling video program at each location.  The events will be both recorded and streamed live, and made available on our website and on our television program.

The Chicago taping will include

Performances by
ONO
Nick Ciontea
Matchess
Mothergirl
Video works by
Thomas Dexter & Heather Dewey-Hagborg
Fern Silva
peter burr
Sabrina Ratté
Jeremy Rotsztain
Jeremy Couillard

 

Directed by Scott Kiernan and Victoria Keddie, this expansive project utilizes a mobile television studio to explore the artist dialogue with broadcast transmission, analog and digital media, and televisual liveness. Each live taping event is the realization of an artists’ collaboration with Kiernan and Keddie.  These events are taped live with a crew of cameramen, sound engineer, and video mixing team in front of an audience. The recorded events air on Manhattan Neighborhood Network public television weekly, as well as online, and have been exhibited internationally.

E.S.P. TV has held over 50 live taping events internationally and has aired over 70 episodes to date and has worked with various venues including: The Whitney Museum of American Art, New Museum, Museum of Arts and Design, Printed Matter, Millennium Film Workshop, New School, Rawson Projects, Recess (NYC); Interstate Projects, Spectacle Theater, Issue Project Room, Roulette (Brooklyn); Franklin Street Works (Stamford, CT), Liminal Space (Oakland, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Ballroom Marfa (Marfa, TX), General Public (Berlin),  STORE (Dresden), Studio XX (Montreal), Kling and Bang Gallery (Reykjavik) and Pallas Projects (Dublin).

E.S.P. TV broadcasts every Tuesday night at 10PM on Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN). Channel 67 in Manhattan, as well as online at www.mnn.org.  All episodes are then posted online on our website and Vimeo platforms.  E.S.P. TV now also airs on Wednesdays with Comcast Cable 66/966 or Verizon Fios 29/30 in Philadelphia at 11:30PM.



Filed under: animation, experimental, narrative, video

THE OTOLITH GROUP

The Radiant & People To Be Resembling
RUN OF LIFE Experimental
Documentary Series

the-radiant-2012-film-still-by-the-otolith-group-courtesy-and-copyright-the-artists

Monday, March 23, 7 pm, $10
Constellation, 3111 N Western Ave, Chicago, IL
Purchase tickets here.

THE RADIANT and PEOPLE TO BE RESEMBLING
by The Otolith Group
Screened in association with LUX

Preceded by BABBIT RESERVE MINING BLAST by Jack Behrend
Courtesy of Chicago Film Archives
With minimalist synth improvisation by Nick Broste, Kent Lambert, and Seth Vanek

Program Details
THE RADIANT(2012, HD video, 64 min)
Commissioned as part of dOCUMENTA (13) in 2012, The Radiant explores the aftermath of March 11, 2011, when the Tohoku earthquake triggered a tsunami that killed many thousands and caused the partial meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on the east coast of Japan. A film essay burdened by the difficult task of representing the invisible aftermath of nuclear fallout, The Radiant travels through time and space to invoke the historical promises of nuclear energy and the threats of radiation that converge in Japan’s illuminated cities and evacuated villages in the months immediately following the disasters. The Otolith Group’s cinematic document offers glimpses into the shape and presence of an unseen entity and its abstract manifestation through visual phenomena.

PEOPLE TO BE RESEMBLING (2102, HD video, 22min)
People To Be Resembling can be described as a five sided portrait of the methodologies of the post-free jazz, pre-world music trio Codona, founded by multi-instrumentalists Collin Walcott, Don Cherry, and Nana Vasconcelos in 1978. Consisting of stills by renowned photographers Roberto Masotti and Isio Saba, newly filmed and archival footage and original music performed by musician Charles Hayward, People to be Resembling reimagines the poetics of permutation that informed the sonic geography of the first Codona album recorded with ECM in September 1978. People to be Resembling returns to 1978 in order to redream the recording process at Tonstudio Bauer as a meditation upon the relations between visual anthropology, anti-colonial choreography, nuclear annihilation and Weltmusik. In its arrangement of positive and negative with colour and black and white and still and moving imagery, The Otolith Group’s People to Be Resembling stages an experiment in mnemonic cohabitation inspired by the visionary music of Codona.

The Otolith Group was founded in 2002 and consists of Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun who live and work in London. During their longstanding collaboration The Group have drawn from a wide range of resources and materials. They explore the moving image, the archive, the sonic and the aural within the gallery context. The work is research based and in particular has focused on the essay film as a form that seeks to look at conditions, events and histories in their most expanded form.

 

Special thanks to LUX and Chicago Film Archives for Program Support

luxlogoBEST_GRAB                  anniversary-logo



Filed under: animation, archival, documentary, documentation, experimental, film, found footage, international, music, narrative, new media, performance, reading, surveillance, Uncategorized, video

The ANIMATED ARCHIVE

Recent Work by Kelly Sears
Kelly Sears in person!

Once_It Started_It_Could_Not_End_Otherwise

Sunday, March 15th at 5:00pm, $7-10
The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N Milwaukee, Chicago, IL

Kelly Sears is an experimental animator that cuts up and collages imagery from American culture and politics to intervene with the history embedded in the frame.  Working with appropriated images ranging from thrift store cast-offs to archival material, she uses animation to rebuild American histories that shift between the official and the uncanny while exploring contemporary narratives of power, such as manifest destiny, occupation and surveillance.

This hour-long program contains films that address failure – of technology, of progress, and history.  But this failure creates an opportunity to ­­reexamine and envision other speculative narratives. A former President is possessed by his nightmares, high school students are infected by a sinister force in their school’s architecture, astronauts drift away from their missions and telephone operators are built into a covert observation network.

Her work has screened at museums, galleries and film festivals, such as MOMA, The Hammer Museum, LACMA, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Machine Project, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Light Industry, Sundance Film Festival, SXSW Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival and Black Maria Film Festival. She teaches animation and film production at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Program Details
PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL  (2015,  HD video, 6:00)
As you read the rest of this manual, keep in mind the need for a
survival pattern.

THE DRIFT (2007, HD video, 8:20)
A mysterious disappearance on a late 1960s space journey entrances the
nation. This film reexamines the nature of our country’s expansionist
endeavors and the desire to push too far, too fast.

COVER ME ALPHA (2011, HD video, 2:30)
Names of maneuvers and procedures from a military yearbook re-caption
the activities of soldiers in battle.
(more…)



Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, experimental, feminism, video

EYEWORKS 2014

Experimental Animation Festival

PageImage-513947-4863611-eyeworks_face

Friday & Saturday, November 14-15th
Doors open one half hour before every screening

Mark your calendars! The 2014 Eyeworks Festival, now in its 5th year,  returns to The Nightingale. The kickoff program will be at the Museum of Contemporary Art on Nov. 11, with additional screenings, including a program with  festival guest Caleb Wood, at the Nightingale on Nov. 14-15.

Nightingale Program 1
Friday, November 14, 2014
7:00 PM, admission $10Festival guest Caleb Wood in person! Caleb will be showing a program of his animated short films, as well as a selection of films that have inspired his work.
Wood’s animations have been screened at top animation festivals internationally, and his work has been featured on Adult Swim. He was selected for the prestigious Animation Artist in Residency Tokyo program in 2013, where he made his film “Goodbye Rabbit Hop Hop.” He will introduce the program of his work, which will include around 20 short pieces, and participate in an audience Q&A after the screening.

 

Nightingale Program 2
Saturday, November 15, 2014
5:00 PM, admission $10
Robert Breer, 69, 1968
Doris Chase, Circles I, 1971
Larry Cuba, 3/78, 1978
Chris Sullivan, The Beholder, 1983
Nicole Hewitt, In/Dividu, 1998
Neil Taylor, Copy Copy, 1999
Sandra Desmazieres, Sans Queue Ni Tete, 2001
Laszlo Csaki, Days That Were Filled With Sense by Fear, 2002-03
Daniel Barrow, Advanced Search Terms, 2012-13
Sarina Nihei, Trifling Habits, 2013
Karolina Glusiec, Velocity, 2013
Nick Butcher, Sidewalk, 2014
Allison Schulnik, Eager, 2014


Nightingale Program 3
Saturday, November 15, 2014
8:00 PM, admission $10Note: Program 3 is a modified version of the MCA program, screening Tuesday Nov. 11.
John Whitney Jr, Terminal Self, 1971
Florence Miailhe, Hammam, 1992
Georges Schwizgebel, Jeu, 2006
Hoji Tsuchiya, Black Long Skirt, 2010
Leslie Baum and Frederick Wells, Megillat Breakdown, 2013
Eri Kawaguchi, Flower and Steam, 2013
Joung Yumi, Love Games, 2013
Johan Rijpma, Descent, 2014
Joshua Mosley, Jeu de Paume, 2014
Yoriko Mizushiri, Snow Hut, 2014
Jake Fried, Headspace, 2014
Zeitguised, Birds, 2014
All programs preceded by works by Neil Taylor: “Roll Film” and “Short Lives”

Check here for more exciting EYEWORKS news!



Filed under: 16mm, animation, archival, experimental, film, international, video

SUGGESTIVE GESTURES

David Finkelstein in person!
Shorts by Thorne Brandt and Jesse Malmed!

glorious_gestures

Monday, October 27th at 7:00 pm, $7-10

A poet’s journey though corridors of liquid geometry where words float and echoes are visual; where portals open onto morphing gardens with unlimited horizons.

—Mike Kuchar

The Nightingale is proud to host the Chicago premiere of David Finkelstein’s debut feature, Suggestive Gestures. An oneiric, surprising odyssey through seductive, hyperreal and overwhelming spaces that float somewhere between the screen and your body. Piloted by expansive and elastic improvisation, the work unfolds into continually unpredictable and astonishing new territories.

(more…)



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, experimental, video

ELEGY TO CONNIE

Animated Documentary by Sarah Paulsen

Women in women

 Saturday, July 19th at 8:00 pm, $7-10

On February 7th, 2008, in Kirkwood, Missouri, an affluent suburb of St. Louis, Lee “Cookie” Thornton opened fire in a city meeting killing five people, among them councilwoman Connie Karr. Thorton had long been an resident of the adjacent Meacham Park, which was subsumed by Kirkwood via eminent domain for commercial development in the late 90’s. ELEGY TO CONNIE (2014) is a feature-length animated documentary that examines the complex events prior to and after the shootings as retold by a group of grassroots community builders who were close with the late councilwoman. The film was made partially in collaboration with these women and is based on their stories. Paulsen’s intricate and beautiful animations serve as a platform to explore memory, mass shootings, citizen representation, the utopian suburban dream, and healing after tragedy.

A discussion with the filmmaker will follow the screening.

ELEGY TO CONNIE is supported by a Mid America Arts Alliance Grant underwritten by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Missouri Arts Council.

Sarah Paulsen is an artist, filmmaker and community organizer whose artwork has been exhibited widely in local and national exhibitions, and whose films have been featured in the St. Louis International Film Festival, the True/False Film Festival (St. Louis, MO), and the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, among many others. A 2010 C.A.T. Institute fellow, she has also completed numerous residencies – including the Cite Internationale des Arts, Paris – and orchestrated several large-scale St. Louis-based community projects. In 2009 she founded the now-annual People’s Joy Parade on Cherokee Street, which will soon be in its sixth year. Paulsen holds a B.A. in visual art from the University of Missouri, Columbia and an M.F.A. from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Art at Washington University. She lives and works in St. Louis, where she teaches art and animation at the St. Louis Art Museum, Marian Middle School and the St. Louis Community College, Forest Park.

Programmed by Christy LeMaster

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, documentary, experimental, video

AVANT-GARDE AS KITSCH

YouTube and Avant-Garde Cinema
A Talk by Colin Beckett

technoviking

 Saturday, June 28th at 8:00 pm, $7-10

The vernacular video forms that have emerged on YouTube and other online services over the last eight years frequently bear striking resemblance to the non-narrative strategies that have constituted the history of avant-garde film and video.

While many critics and scholars have noted the resemblance, the implications for the cinematic avant-garde have gone largely unconsidered. As non-narrative internet videos begin to eclipse commercial cinema in viewership and cultural influence, the rise of YouTube might be seen, from one angle, as a covert triumph for the avant-garde. But if this is the case, these developments also initiate a crisis for experimental cinema, liquidating the relations that have structured it and calling into questions claims made on the behalf of its ideological force.

This lecture, illustrated with internet videos, asks how the new preeminence of non-narrative and fragmentary video forms recasts the history of avant-garde film and video and what sort of space it leaves for contemporary avant-garde moving image practice–particularly one geared toward an emancipatory politics. (CB)

Colin Beckett is a writer based in Brooklyn New York. His work has appeared in BOMBblog,The Brooklyn Rail, Cineaste, Moving Image Source, Idiom Magazine, The L Magazine, and wuxia.

Programmed by Christy LeMaster

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, experimental, film, found footage, lecture, new media, Uncategorized, video

Next Page »