1084 N MILWAUKEE, CHICAGO

The EYESLICER ROAD SHOW

In Smell-O-Vision!
Producer Dan Schoenbrun, in person

Sunday, October 22 at 6 PM, $7-10

The Nightingale is proud to present THE EYESLICER, an independent variety TV series co-created by Dan Schoenbrun and Vanessa McDonnell. The show is a smorgasbord of boundary-pushing short-form work from the festival circuit and beyond, featuring 50+ short film favorites and newly commissioned and created works, combined into hour-long, themed mix tape episodes.

To celebrate the release of the ten-episode, ten-hour first season, co-creator Dan Schoenbrun is touring the country this Fall with “The Eyeslicer Roadshow”, a one-night-only live event featuring robot Q&As, communal milk and cookies, and an episode presented in special ‘Smell-O-Vision’.

The Eyeslicer premiered at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival. It has been hailed as “one of the craziest TV shows you’ll ever see” (Indiewire) and “an insane variety show puree” (Entertainment Weekly). The show features work by David Lowery, Amy Seimetz, the Zellner Brothers, Shaka King, Calvin Reeder, Lauren Wolkstein, Yen Tan, Harrison Atkins, Zia Anger, Frances Bodomo, Nathan Silver, Brian Lonano, Borscht, Celia Rowlson Hall, Patrick Bresnan + Ivete Lucas, Ornana, Leah Shore, Jennifer Reeder, and many, many more.

Program Details:
The Eyeslicer
Directed by Various.
(2017. USA, 118 min.)



Filed under: anarchy, animation, artist in attendance, collaboration, documentary, expanded cinema, experimental, narrative, Uncategorized, video

QUICKENING

Experimental Animations by Mothers
Presented by Extended Practice

Saturday, October 7 at 6 PM, $7-10

This international program of experimental animations illuminates the connection between the process of animation and the experience of parenting, and celebrates motherhood as especially rich creative territory. From the first flicker of life, a mother’s sense of time, space, reality and even her own body transforms. As a flexible medium, animation can construct realities and play with the elasticity of time and space. The works in this screening utilize intergenerational collaboration, evocative materiality, layered narratives, and the physical engagement of the creator with every frame.

This screening is programmed for the Nightingale Cinema by Sara Holwerda and Angela Lopez as part of Extended Practice, an artist-led collaborative project created to support the work and needs of artists who are mothers.

Featuring work by: Lindsay Arnold, Shira Avni, Lisa Barcy,  Heather Freeman, Georgie Flood,  Ariana Gerstein, Megan Hildebrandt, Anna Hrachovec, Emily Hubley, Faith Hubley, Debbie Lee, Marjorie Lemay, Jennifer Levonian, Maria Lorenzo, Alison O’Neill, Vanessa Sweet, Lynn Tomlinson, Selina Trepp, and Karen Yasinsky

Total runtime: 75 minutes.

Nursing mothers are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

Funding for this screening is supported in part by the DCASE Individual Artist Project grant.



Filed under: animation, experimental, feminism, film, queer, sound, Uncategorized

INAATE/SE/

[it shines a certain way. to a
certain place/it flies. falls./]


Friday, September 22 at 8 PM, $7-10
Part of RUN OF LIFE
Experimental Documentary Series
Director Adam Khalil, in person!

 

History is written by the victors, but this film reminds us
 that the history of the oppressed can still be saved from being extinguished. Native American video artists Adam and Zack Khalil here reclaim the narrative of the Ojibway of Sault Ste. Marie, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, from the archives and museums that would confine it to the past. Using personal interviews, animated drawings, performance, and provocative intercutting, the Khalil brothers’ feature debut makes a bold case for the Ojibway people to be their own storytellers—while seeking a cure for the damage inflicted by colonization—in a spiritual reconnection with tradition.

Read an interview with the makers here.

Program Details:
INAATE/SE/[it shines a certain way. to a
certain place/it flies. falls./]
Directed by Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil.
(2016. USA/Canada, 75 min.)

Adam Shingwak Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Adam’s work has been exhibited at UnionDocs, e-flux, Maysles Cinema, Microscope Gallery (New York), Museo ExTeresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), Spektrum (Berlin), Trailer Gallery (Sweden), Carnival of eCreativity (Bombay), and Fine Art Film Festival Szolnok (Hungary). Khalil is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar. In 2011 he graduated from the Film and Electronic Arts program at Bard College.

Zack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, currently based in Brooklyn, NY. His work often explores an indigenous worldview and undermines traditional forms of historical authority through the excavation of alternative histories and the use of innovative documentary forms. He recently completed a B.A. at Bard College in the Film and Electronic Arts Department, and is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar.

 

 



Filed under: animation, artist in attendance, collaboration, documentary, experimental, geography, history, home movies, landscape, narrative, rural, social justice, Uncategorized

INNER DISTANCES

Programmer, Amanda VanValkenburg,
in Attendance

Friday, September 8 at 8 PM, $7-10

Inner Distances, a screening curated by Amanda VanValkenburg, examines how technology affects sense of place and sense of self. Relationships to location becomes abstracted through the mediation of devices. The internet creates familiar landing sites, social media pages become extensions of identity, and google maps can be used to explore topographically accurate recreations of locations around the world. Sense of place is an abstraction of location navigated by information, senses, and physical stimulus. This screening is focused on repurposing devices or software to explore concepts of space and technology, or other strategies that investigate relationships between the virtual and the physical.

This project was developed with support from High Concept Labs.

Program Details:

Parastoo Anoushahpour, Ryan Ferko and Faraz Anoushahpour
Bunte Kuh
(5 min)
Through a flood of images and impressions, a narrator attempts to recall a family holiday. Produced in Berlin and Toronto, Bunte Kuh combines a found postcard, family photo album, and original footage to weave together the temporal realities of two separate vacations.

Johann Lurf
Embargo
(10 minutes)
The oscillating sound of video games, glass facades, barbed wire and high walls that block our view of what goes on behind them. Someone has something to hide here. In EMBARGO we peer over the barriers, past red eyes and CCTV cameras and into state-of-the-art premises of arms and drone manufacturers. The elaborate recording techniques create quite a distinctive spatiality, drifting between distance and closeness. A science-fiction nightmare, dangerously close to reality.

Orr Menirom
Clinton and Sanders Looking at the World and Naming Things for the First Time
(11 minutes)
This short video is based on a CNN debate which took place in April 2016 between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The visuals of the debate have been removed and replaced with a series of dreamlike images. Paired with this alternative footage, the politicians’ words narrate a new and personal story, revealing the subconscious of the politicians. The debate turns into a Rorschach test onto which viewers can project their own thoughts and associations.

Brock Neilson
Reunion 1
(7 minutes)
The artist re-enters a space from their childhood as an adult, freely exploring and reimagining the tone of the space through the lens of an iphone and a year-long process of editing sound and footage on an apple desktop computer.

Daniel Spangler
The Age of Branches
(8 minutes)
A dramatic retelling of systemic collapse, unfolding on the scale of nanoseconds, The Age of Branches examines the American power infrastructure during a crisis of continental proportions, reframing the jargon of its technical port-mortem as mythic language.

Amanda VanValkenburg
Unnatural Disasters
(10 minutes)
A 3D sculpted environment full of architecture caught in the act of critical change. Simulated disasters oscillate on the border between realism and complete artifice with a slow observation of decay. Basing each vignette off of existing locations, the 3D re-enactment allows an destructive intervention that is ephemeral by design.

Calum Walter
Terrestrial
(10 minutes)
The observations of an object in motion: A mobile device captures the trajectories of objects liberated from and bound to land, against a backdrop of uniquely human dissonance. Terrestrial attempts to articulate a desire to transcend bodily limits with electronics and machines, while acknowledging an unavoidable level of dysfunction. The film was inspired by an incident in 2014 where a Blue Line train in Chicago failed to stop at its final destination, the O’Hare airport, and eventually came to a stop halfway up the escalator at the airport’s entrance. Terrestrial re- imagines this accident as an earthbound machine’s failed takeoff.

Blake Williams
Red Capriccio
(7 minutes) 
An anaglyph 3D found footage film about machines and landscape that interlaces motion with stasis, crescendos with glissandos, and reds with blues. Its triangular structure juxtaposes scenes of a parked Chevy Caprice police vehicle, a cruise along Montréal’s infamous Turcot Interchange, and a visit to a basement rave room.

About the Artists:

Parastoo Anoushahpour, Faraz Anoushahpour, and Ryan Ferko have worked in collaboration since 2013. Using various performative structures to work in relation to speci c sites, their projects explore collabora- tion as a way to upset the authority of a singular narrator or position. Currently based in Toronto, recent lm and installation work has been shown at Projections (New York Film Festival), Wavelengths (Toronto Inter- national Film Festival), International Film Festival Rotterdam, Internationale Kurz lmtage Oberhausen (Ger- many), Portland International Film Festival, Media City Festival (Windsor/Detroit), Experimenta (Bangalore), Crossroads Festival (San Francisco), and ZK/U Centre for Art & Urbanistics (Berlin), Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography (Toronto), SPACES Art Centre (Cleveland), and Trinity Square Video (Toronto).

Johann Lurf is an artist and filmmaker, using the moving image to analyse and restructure space and film. His practice involves observational and documentary filmmaking especially in the field of structural film, as well as an approach to found footage which is strongly oriented on filmic language itself. Born in 1982 in Vienna Lurf has studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and the Slade School of Art in London. He graduated from Harun Farocki’s film class in 2009. He received the State Grant of Austria for Video and Media Art and participated in the Artist-in- Residence Programs at the MAK Center for Arts and Architecture in Los Angeles 2011, the SAIC in Chicago 2015 and in Tokyo 2016. His work has been shown internationally and recognized with awards in numerous exhibitions and festivals.

Orr Menirom’s work explores the border between what is real and what is barely or beyond perceptible. Mixing appropriated materials with self shot footage, she cuts and pastes sentences and uses other people’s words to question language as the border between the political and the existential. Originally from Tel Aviv, Israel, Menirom is an alumna of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (2016), the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA, 2014), Kuvataideakatemia (exchange student, 2009) and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (BFA, 2010). She was a 2016-17 research fellow at the Jan Van Eyck Academy (NL). Solo and two person shows include The Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, Des Moines Art Center (IA), Aspect/Ratio Gallery (IL) and Fafa Gallery (Helsinki, Finland). Screenings include the International Film Festival Rotterdam (NL), Expo Chicago (IL) and Chicago Underground Film Festival (IL). Awards include a New Artist Society Merit Scholarship, Toni and Tim Urban Artist-in-Residence and an Anna Louise Raymond Fellowship.

Brock Neilson grew up in a rural part of Idaho and is currently based in Salt Lake City. They typically work in abstract sound, costume-making, drag performance and electronic music.

Based in a diverse and expanding multimedia practice, Pennsylvania-born artist, musician, and writer Daniel Spangler creates speculative, narrative-based works that examine the construction of personal and mass-media languages used by humans to reconcile themselves with the complexities of the natural world–a process by which storytelling arises as an emergent phenomena. Formerly a visual effects artist, he attended the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, and later received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was awarded the New Artists Society Fellowship. His work has been exhibited and screened at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Anthology Film Archives in New York, the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago, and many others.

Amanda VanValkenburg uses her background in painting and drawing to inform her work with 3D software to make videos that play in the uncanny valley. Her work has been shown in the MCA, Mana Contemporary, the Gene Siskel, the Elmhurst Museum, the Nightingale, 6018 North Gallery, Links Hall, LeRoy Neiman Center Gallery, and the Chicago Digital Media Festival. She was recently a High Concept Labs sponsored artist and an Oxbow Artist in Residence.

Calum Walter is an artist focusing on sound and the moving image. He has a BFA from the University of Colorado where he studied filmmaking with an emphasis on sound, and later received a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work has screened at places including the New York Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Rencontres Internationales Paris/Berlin, Hong Kong Arts Centre, Slamdance, FIC Valdivia, and Ann Arbor Film Festival. He lives in Chicago and teaches in the department of Radio, Television and Film at Northwestern University.

Blake Williams was in born in Houston, Texas and currently lives, works, and writes in Toronto, Canada, where he is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute. His stereoscopic videos propose mutant and imaginary histories of representational media by exploring the buried or ‘useless’ functionalities of visual technologies. His work has screened at venues such as the Toronto International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Locarno Festival, and International Short Film Festival of Oberhausen.



Filed under: animation, architecture, artist in attendance, collaboration, experimental, geography, new media, Uncategorized

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